Originally published in the November 2017 issue of TransWorld SNOWboarding, Cody Warble is one of eight interviews conducted with up-and-coming riders over the course of a week in Aspen, Colorado in April 2017.

Cody Warble is the outlier in this crew we've gathered in Aspen. While most of the snowboards sitting outside the house we're staying in are adorned with energy drink stickers and have yet to hit the market, Cody's is a decade-old, well-worn Santa Cruz Josh Malay pro model, mounted with a thrashed pair of Unions with Legendary Banked Slalom highbacks. Cody was born into snowboarding, but as a teenager, he's forging a path of his own, outside of the competitive realm. He's content to plant his hand firmly on the coping with no one watching while riders chuck for the camera around him, and you might find him outside in a haze with a couple pals, while a party rages inside. Authentic and stylish, Cody will make a name for himself, and it won't be on a scoreboard. -- Taylor Boyd

PHOTO: Chris Wellhausen.

Do you remember your first time snowboarding?
I think I started when I was four, so I faintly remember it. I went to Beaver Creek with my dad and just strapped on some super old Burton board that we found from a friend. I took some laps with him on the magic carpet and just fucking loved it and kept going.

PHOTO: Chris Wellhausen.

Straight to the board, eh? No skis first.
Yeah, exactly. Actually that snowboard that I'm riding--Josh Malay was my dad's super good friend during the time, so he kind of got us into skateboarding more and started pushing me to get on boards more.

Your dad has been involved in the action sports industry since you were young, right?
Yeah, for sure. He worked for Oakley for 25 years or something. He rips. It's hard to keep up with him.

PHOTO: Chris Wellhausen.

When you're a little kid, you're just snowboarding and following your father or your friends or whoever it may be, you're not really identifying as a snowboarder. It's just what you do. When do you feel like you started to do that--to develop your own style and figure out what you like to ride?
It started basically when I began doing contests, just USASA contests. That eventually grew kind of old, I guess. So that's pretty much the start, for me, of identifying with a certain aspect of snowboarding.

Right. Most of the other guys here have their sites set on the Olympics and competing, but you've strayed from that side of things.
I'm straying from the Olympics for sure. There's no way I'm going to be a part of that. It's just not for me, you know. Snowboarding is different for different people, and I'm stoked to just be a part of it and board as much as I can and have fun as long as I can.

PHOTO: Chris Wellhausen.

Do you like competing?
No, not really. But it depends on what I'm competing with--like if it's a cool competition with friends, just like a jam session, like Das Tables was a pretty good time. But contests like that are a whole different story compared to a Rev Tour or a Grand Prix or shit like that; that's a full-on contest, and it's stressful. It's no fun for me. But I know a lot of people, like Brock and Red, who kill it cause they're just gods at that stuff.

So how do you visualize your trajectory in snowboarding?
I just want to snowboard as long as I can. I want to film as much as I can and get into that more.

PHOTO: Chris Wellhausen.

If you were to film a part, would you want to get on a sled and go in the backcountry or film more in the street?
Ultimately, you want to get into the backcountry. It's the dream for, I feel like, everyone. I've figured it out a little bit through my dad, but I would like to just incorporate myself into that powder/backcountry scene a little more.

PHOTO: Chris Wellhausen.

Who is your favorite snowboarder to watch?
Probably Nicolas Müller. I love his movie Fruition. I've been watching it on repeat. I just like the way it was created. It was kind of trippy, you know? Very artistic.

Do you have a trick that you would call your favorite?
Method. Just boosting a method is the best thing to do and to watch because everyone's is different. It's a trick that's unique for everyone.

What do you like to listen to when you're snowboarding?
I listen to a lot of Jimi Hendrix and just old blues and guitar and stuff like that. If I could have a Jimi Hendrix song in a video part, that'd be so sick.

Is planting a hand cooler than going 20 feet?
Yeah, definitely.

PHOTO: Chris Wellhausen.

What's next for you?
Work. I coach skateboarding in my town, Edwards, then just wash dishes and cook food at a restaurant called The Rose.

PHOTO: Chris Wellhausen.

Then what?
If I can save enough I'd like to move out to Salt Lake City.

Meet the rest of the eight riders to watch here.