Snowboard Grabs: Bloody Dracula

The Grab:
Front hand reaches around the back all the way to the tail, while the rear hand also grabs tail.

The Tweak:
Front leg boned, rear leg bent, the nose is aggressively poked down, doing whatever it takes to get ahold of this grab.

Performed By: Nils Mindnich.

The History:
The bloody Dracula’s name origin is as mysterious as Count Dracula himself. The first usage of the term Dracula in grab naming was by North Carolina to Northwest snowboard transplant J.D. Platt, who invented and coined the term lien Dracula in 1989 during The Timberline Classic halfpipe competition at Timberline, Oregon (Mt. Hood). J.D. aired on his frontside wall, grabbing heel edge with his rear hand (across the front of the body like a nuclear method), while simultaneously grabbing toe edge with his front hand between the front foot and the nose. Since this grab somewhat resembled a lien air with his arms crossed in front of him (vampire sleeping style) he called it a lien Dracula. With the term Dracula introduced into snowboarding, it was later repurposed for the reach around double tail grabbing trick performed above.

Originally, a true bloody Dracula required the arms to be crossed behind the back (explaining the use of the Dracula reference). After this grab was included on Travis Parker’s Capita “Unorthodox” pro model with its built-in graphic grabbing guide (without explaining that the arms needed to be crossed), the crossed arm requirement relaxed over the coming decade, and uncrossed versions are also now given the Dracula distinction (a confusing departure from why the term Dracula was used in the first place).

Travis Parker's 2005 "Unorthodox" Capita graphic.
Travis Parker’s 2005 “Unorthodox” Capita graphic.

The bloody Dracula requires a full commitment downward tweak, which leaves the board’s nose very exposed to hooking on the snow upon landing. If this were to happen, the result is an unavoidable faceplant, and most likely blood, and thus the bloody Dracula. After nearly two decades of relative obscurity, the Mindnich brothers, Hans and Nils, unthinkably reintroduced the bloody Dracula to the spotlight amid frontside 720s and 1080s in 2013.