Photo gallery linked on the left.

Nate Bozung is arguably snowboarding’s most enigmatic character. He cruises about, city-to-city, state-to-state, and country-to-country-usually Australia-with no real plans but to meet friends, have fun, and catch a mellow buzz. All the while he maintains an Animal Chin-like anonymity-he’ll disappear in a cloud of smoke at the drop of a hat, or a headband.

As a person, Nate’s awesome. He’d give you the shirt off his back and a nugget out his sack without saying a word. He can be somewhat of a mess, but a simple mess, really. Not in a bad way, in a way that that you marvel at him because of how carefree and nonchalant he is at all times.

As a shredder Boznuts holds that natural talent and fluidity that can’t be learned, it’s intrinsic like a bird’s ability to fly. When he straps in he’s not out to change the world or impress anybody, it’s just something to do for fun, and he happens to be really good at it. Nate never asked for anything, none of the fame, none of the politics, and none of the pressure.

Bozung’s a style king, he’s a friend, he’s a soul shredder, and he’s made much more of an impact on the “sport” of snowboarding than he will ever realize. Thanks for keeping it real, buddy.

Most people know you as a snowboarder from Utah, but you started out as a skier at Snow Valley in Southern California.

Yeah my dad was a ski instructor there, and my grandpa had share in some stock out there, so we would go up there all the time. We’d go up on weekends and ski and shit, it was so much fun. I remember running into Pat Abramson and following him around. I remember seeing him do a back flip outta the f-kin’ pipe-it was so sick.

When did you make the switch to snowboarding?

As soon as it came out I wanted to do it, but my dad really didn’t want me to, he wouldn’t let me. But finally, I just talked him into it and it was on (laughs).

What riders did you look up to when you were first getting into it, if anyone?

Terje, Jamie Lynn, and Peter Line. Terje was the first dude I ever saw in video. Even before I used to snowboard, I saw him in some ski video-Eagan brothers or some shit like that.

Are there people you look up to now, anyone you’re stoked on?

I’m sure there are tons of those dudes to different people, but to me, I don’t know.

Most kids who really get into it dream about turning pro at some point. Did you want to be a pro snowboarder?

Yeah, I thought it would be sick because you get to travel, get free stuff-you get paid to get free stuff and travel! I mean, what is that (laughs)?

But not at first, though. I was just in Utah and I couldn’t skate during the winter because back then there was no indoor skateparks. So I just started snowboarding because it was sick, it was the next best thing. I remember the first day I moved to Utah me and my brother set up some shit in the backyard-a little table and PVC pipe Iit was tight (laughs).

You never really did the contest thing, so how did it all come about?

Nah, for the most part I hadn’t done any of that, like USSA or Vans Triple Crown or whatever-none of that stuff. When I look back I just kinda cruised. I guess it was just from being in Utah and snowboarding.

Forum was a pretty big gig, right?

Well, I guess it was bigger than I realized. I knew it was big, but I didn’t know what I was getting myself into.

What was it like during the height of the Forum Eight days, during The Resistance and True Life?

(Laughs) That was a crazy time, all those dudes were so sick. It was a good time, I was glad I was a part of it.

How was the pressure going up for a part next to all those guys?

Are you kidding me? I wasn’t en trying to compare any of my stuff to those guys’ (laughs). They were on some different shit.

Do you want to talk any more about the Forum stuff?

Nah, I think that pretty much sums it up.

What do you think of someone like Scotty Wittlake who consciously walked away from it all at the height of his career in snowboarding?

I think it’s sick, he’s doing his own thing. It’s dope, he still shreds, you know? He probably sheds more than I do (laughs).

Probably!

F-k (laughs)! Yeah, I think it’s f-king ill, to each his own. If he doesn’t like it, he doesn’t like it. And it does suck, the politics of it.

Do you ever think about the influence you’ve had over snowboarding?

No, no, I don’t think about that. What is there to think about? I laugh because I’m just a normal nerd trying to scrape by, there’s nothing special about me. I ain’t rollin’ no Benz.

Have you ever considered yourself a role model?

Yeah right!

What is it like to have a career in snowboarding? Or would you even call it a career?

Well, I think there are different levels of it. Some people make it a real career and make tons of money. But in my case it’s been more like this shred-bum career. That’s just the way I chose to do it, that’s just the way it is, and it’s all good-I love it.

What do you think about the level that snowboarding has progressed too today?

It’s crazy. Freaking, Eero (Ettala) is doing switch triple back flips (laughs)! I can’t wait to see that. Everything is going crazy, not just snowboarding, people are on motorcycles doing double back flips. It’s always going to go somewhere, it’s always going to progress. I love it-I love seeing what people are doing.

And it’s just whatever you’re into. Some people are into doing this, some people are into doing that-you say tomato, I say tomato. A lot of people say flying tomato (laughs)! You can look at it however you want-it’s anything.

You ever get any good advice?

(Laughs) Yeah, I get advice all the time. I take what I get from whoever I’m getting it from, that’s pretty much what I’ve always done. I’ve always tried to figure out what life’s all about. I see it when I travel. I look at how other people live and I don’t judge them. That’s why it’s so easy to get stuck places. It’s so fun to just be like, “Well, let’s just see how they do it here.” And I try to actually do it how they do it, instead of just going to all the tourist spots. I mean, I’ll live there for a month or two … or three (laughs).

How do you see the snowboard scene in Utah now compared to the scene in Utah five or six years ago?

I don’t know, it’s just weird.

Has it changed a lot?

No, there’s always going to be the kids that are biting, and the kids that are stoked. There’s going to be the kids that are chilling, and the kids that are serious and trying to get footage. There’s going to be all walks of life all of the time. So it’s all the same.

What advice would you have for the kids who want to come up?

Oh dude, anyone who wants to come up-come up! It’s not as hard as you think it is, just keep doing it and don’t listen to the haters. I had so many people telling me, “Oh you need to go to college and get a real job,” telling me I need to do all this bullshit. But I was like, “Whatever, f-k that, I’m gonna go snowboard.” And I made what I made out of it. You might have to stay on some couches for a couple of years, but it’s an adventure. You could be doing worse things (laughs).

Has snowboarding changed at all for you after doing so much crazy stuff? On a day-to-day level is it different now?

No, snowboarding has always been this grounding thing for me. When I go out it’s just like, “Ahhh.” I do something, and I’m pretty good at it. But then sometimes it’s still crazy. I guess it really hasn’t changed, it’s just the same old. You get anxiety, you get scared, whatever. It’s just all part of the game.

Could you ever see yourself going out and filming with another crew again?

I don’t know, probably not (laughs). I mean no. I’ll go out and shoot if I’m in town and there’s homeys filming for other videos, I’ll go out with them. But then again you never know. I’m just trying to do my thing.

It seemed like you’re back in the game more these days. You were off the radar for a while there, what happened?

I decided to get a “real” job and just freakin’ chill for a little bit. I actually had two jobs. I worked as a bar back for about two weeks-that was sick. I f-king knocked everything over, it was crazy. Then I worked in the Electric warehouse packing boxes. We (Matty Ryan and I) tried to move back to Salt Lake, but I was pretty broke and my credit wasn’t all that good, so no one would let us move there (laughs).
Then I was driving with my license suspended for like three years and didn’t even know it, so I had to go to court for that shit. It’s just the same shit every day. But whatever, if you have a million bucks, I guess there’s still shit you have to deal with. Actually, I’m sure you have more shit to deal with. Now I have a couple more sponsors, Sessions hooked it up, and BozWreck did pretty well. I got a little cheddar in my pocket, so now I gotta fix my car (laughs).

How do you think people will react to your interview?

People are probably gonna hate that I even had this interview. But don’t be mad at me because I’m having fun and you guys are still trying to carry yourselves. I’ve already been there, done that.

What do you think you’ll be doing once snowboarding is a full wrap?

I don’t know. I just want to keep doing Neff shit. I just want to keep in the industry. It has its ups and downs, but so does everything. And you can’t keep partying forever. I wish I could, but you have to do something-that stuff gets old. Plus I’ve got to make some money to hook my chick up-buy her some sweet stuff (laughs).

If the world was going to end tomorrow, what would you want your last words to be?

If the world was going to end tomorrow, the last thing that I would want to say into this little microphone would be, ‘Later guys, it was fun (laughs)!”

go out it’s just like, “Ahhh.” I do something, and I’m pretty good at it. But then sometimes it’s still crazy. I guess it really hasn’t changed, it’s just the same old. You get anxiety, you get scared, whatever. It’s just all part of the game.

Could you ever see yourself going out and filming with another crew again?

I don’t know, probably not (laughs). I mean no. I’ll go out and shoot if I’m in town and there’s homeys filming for other videos, I’ll go out with them. But then again you never know. I’m just trying to do my thing.

It seemed like you’re back in the game more these days. You were off the radar for a while there, what happened?

I decided to get a “real” job and just freakin’ chill for a little bit. I actually had two jobs. I worked as a bar back for about two weeks-that was sick. I f-king knocked everything over, it was crazy. Then I worked in the Electric warehouse packing boxes. We (Matty Ryan and I) tried to move back to Salt Lake, but I was pretty broke and my credit wasn’t all that good, so no one would let us move there (laughs).
Then I was driving with my license suspended for like three years and didn’t even know it, so I had to go to court for that shit. It’s just the same shit every day. But whatever, if you have a million bucks, I guess there’s still shit you have to deal with. Actually, I’m sure you have more shit to deal with. Now I have a couple more sponsors, Sessions hooked it up, and BozWreck did pretty well. I got a little cheddar in my pocket, so now I gotta fix my car (laughs).

How do you think people will react to your interview?

People are probably gonna hate that I even had this interview. But don’t be mad at me because I’m having fun and you guys are still trying to carry yourselves. I’ve already been there, done that.

What do you think you’ll be doing once snowboarding is a full wrap?

I don’t know. I just want to keep doing Neff shit. I just want to keep in the industry. It has its ups and downs, but so does everything. And you can’t keep partying forever. I wish I could, but you have to do something-that stuff gets old. Plus I’ve got to make some money to hook my chick up-buy her some sweet stuff (laughs).

If the world was going to end tomorrow, what would you want your last words to be?

If the world was going to end tomorrow, the last thing that I would want to say into this little microphone would be, ‘Later guys, it was fun (laughs)!”