Mammoth Mountain received a total of 94 inches out of the storm that started on Tuesday, December 28th. Roads into the resort were closed and lifts were shut down Friday, reopening Saturday for some of the most epic turns of the season. We checked in with Park Manager Oren Tanzer to see how the conditions are today. He was in the middle of marking rails and digging ‘em out. “This place is insane. There’s no Unbound Park right now. It’s buried under 90 inches of snow and the seven-day forecast is calling for snow every day. We’ll be diggin’ out for a while. It’s a good problem to have, though,” Oren said.

At the Lake Tahoe resorts, snow shut down I-80 and 50 Thursday and Friday and also stopped flights at the Reno-Tahoe Airport for part of Thursday. Jibbers drove against traffic from Truckee to Reno and word is that there were numerous rail sessions going down in the city, which got two feet of snow. Squaw is reporting eight feet over the last week with “legendary” conditions. Northstar-At-Tahoe, Alpine Meadows, Heavenly, and Sierra-At-Tahoe are all reporting epic powder conditions with about an average of six-feet of fresh each. Grab them tire chains and head for the Sierras. There’s plenty of powder and more on the way.

Kirkwood, tucked back in South Lake, is keeping its ten-foot storm dump (124 inches) hush-hush. So far this season the resort has received 312 inches of snow, and it’s only January 2nd, people. No one was answering the phones at Kirkwood to comment.

The resorts of Utah also got hit with a major storm system. Storm totals on New Year’s day were reported by The Utah Avalanche Center to be 3-5 feet in the Cottonwood resorts of Snowbird, Brighton, and Solitude, with 2-4 feet hitting The Canyons and Park City. Solitude reported 67 inches by yesterday, culminating in a 302-inch base and you know there’re still freshies at this often-overlooked resort.

Mt. Baker’s season was off to a slow start, but it got a good dump out of this storm cycle, too. No word on how much, but the photos speak for themselves.

Readers, you know what needs to be done. Slowly step away from the computer, grab your board, and head for the hills. Just remember to keep it safe, now isn’t a good time to be in the backcountry–that’s a lot of snow to fall on your head.