You’re French Canadian.

Yeah, I’m from Chicoutimi, Quebec, Canada. The town is separated by a large fjord called the Saguenay River. It’s very beautiful, especially in the fall when all of the trees run red and crazy. People around my town are very fun and pretty laid-back-even though somebody gets into a fight at the bar every night.

Were you a jock back in high school?

I was a skateboarder-one of the four or five in the entire school. All the football and basketball players were hating on us, and the girls were hatin’, too. One time I skipped class to skate the school parking lot and broke my collarbone-the principal wanted to get my backpack out of the locker. I was like, “Nah, I’m fine, I can do it myself,” ’cause I had a three-foot-long bong in there. That was funny shit.

Where’d you start riding?

Le Valinouet resort. It’s about 1,200 feet high with only natural snow-we just rode the mountain, the trees, and the jumps on the side of the slopes. There’s still no pipe to date, although they’ve had a decent park for three years now-props to Gary and Faf. We have the 418 camps there (418camp.com)-it’s always fun to go back and ride with my friends.

Tell me about Whistler

I visited Whistler in the summer of ’96. From there on, I knew it was the place for me. I graduated high school, did one semester at college, and moved to Mount St. Anne with my friends Nalu and Gab. My mom, being a college teacher, was a little skeptical about the idea, but both my parents knew they had to let me move out. In ’98 I moved to Whistler full-time, staying at many places, making a lot of good friends, and riding awesome powder with epic sessions in the pipe. This is very much my favorite place to be in the mountains.

You bought a place in Squamish?

Yeah, last year I moved in between Whistler and Vancouver to Squamish-I love it. It might sound weird, but it’s more convenient since it’s closer to the airport. I travel a lot. It’s better to drive 45 minutes to Squamish after riding than to drive an hour and a half from Vancouver to Whistler when I’m returning home from a trip. I have a four-bedroom house with a yard and no neighbors behind me. Beyond the yard is a big field with a river. We’ve started to build a skate ramp in the back. My girlfriend Megan Pischke lives here when she’s in town, and my friend Simon lives here, too.

You’re Mr. Backcountry Shred now. I used to see only halfpipe shots.

I competed a lot on the ISF tour a few years ago, and there were lots of photographers around. Pipe was pretty much the only thing I rode during that period of time. Then I rode more around Whistler, got a sled, and started filming-I started spending a lot more time in the backcountry ’cause I wanted to get better at it. I’d like to keep a better balance between the two. Halfpipe riding gives you so much control-it helps out a lot in the backcountry.

How important is backcountry safety?

It’s very important to always be extremely aware in the

backcountry. Nature is way stronger than us. With that in mind, everyone should use a transceiver, probe, and shovel at all times. It’s important not to go alone-you need to have each others’ backs. Take some classes about avalanche awareness, and practice with your transceiver a lot. You can never be too careful. It’s a good idea to probe certain landings-jumping off big cornices is the stupidest thing to ever consider doing.

Rumor has it you’re vying for a spot on the Canadian Olympic team?

No. I’m just going to do a lot of traveling and filming. If I wanted to try out for the Olympics, I’d need to start all over to gain points to even enter World Cup events-which is kind of bullshit. I’d just like to ride pipe as well as I used to and learn some new tricks. I have to do the U.S. Open and the European Open, and I want to be able to compete against Danny Kass and those guys. They’re all going to be so pumped with the Olympics coming up. I don’t want tshow up on my first day back in the pipe in months, like last year at the Open, and only be able to do straight airs and mellow spins while they’re doing back-to-back 1080s. We have a night halfpipe setup this year at Blackcomb-it’ll be fun to ride with the 418 crew.

Did you ever expect to come this far-becoming a top Burton pro?

I didn’t expect it to be like this. I’ve just kept going and going and my career has followed me. It’s all just happened at the same pace as my own riding progression, so sometimes I almost take it for granted-even though I work so hard and I realize how fortunate I am. It’s almost like I was meant to live this life.

What might you have done if professional riding didn’t pan out?

I could still be working at a restaurant in Whistler-riding in the winter and surfing all summer.

Surfing and skating are pretty important to you.

Yes. They’re both totally related to snowboarding. With skateboarding, you learn to be more technical and precise. Surfing teaches you how to read the environment you’re riding in and to follow the flow. It’s an excellent off-season sport since it keeps you in good shape and works a lot on your upper body and helps with balance.

Are you always at the gym training?

I’m not really a crazy gym guy. I like swimming and doing other sports. In the fall I usually train a bit more-usually legwork and some push-ups. I was really into power yoga for a while. Stretching is key if you want to recover well from your injuries. I want to be able to surf and snowboard the rest of my life. I don’t want to let things go for five years and have a fucked up body after that. It’s important to put good food in your engine, too. I cut down on the whole fast-food thing, and I eat a lot of fish. Sometimes out on the road you grab something fast, and you just don’t have the same amount of energy.

How important is travel?

I just got back from a three-month journey, and I won’t lie, it feels damn good to be home. I could also never stay in one place for over three months. I guess I’m spoiled with all this discovering-it’s addictive. I’ll try to live this life as long as I can, because one day I’ll have to settle down-I’ll be totally okay with it, I guess. I’m searching for that one place.

You’re a mellow, positive guy, but you must be competitive, too.

No, not really. I’m not very competitive. Even at competitions, I just try to do my best, and if it turns out I do good, I do good. I’m lucky because Burton doesn’t pressure me to do well in contests-they don’t care whether I do them or not. I just want to be out there having fun. The good comps are the jam sessions when you just ride. If you’re on fire, you do well.

With filming, some people get pretty competitive in terms of who did what trick or whatever-I don’t care. I’m stoked for everybody who gets to ride some fun stuff.

You’re not that guy who’s mad because another rider landed a switch backside seven?

No, I see that all the time. I’m the dude who’s going to shuttle him back up and be like, “Come on, now you can do the switch back nine!” I’m not a hater.

Having fun on the hill has a lot to do with your company.

Yeah, this winter I rode a lot with Willie Yli-Luoma and Jussi Oksanen-they are very fun to ride with.

I rode a lot by myself, too-it was a bit more difficult to get motivated. I was filming with Mac Dawg, and Lukas Huffman was hurt most of the time I was in Whistler. Nobody was around, so I’d go out with filmer Sean Kearns and photographer Dano Pendygrasse, or Dice K Maru and we’d go hit jumps or do lines. It was pretty hard-those guys would be smokin’ cigs and shouting, “All right, David, you ready up there?” I was like “Uh, maybe I’ll come down one more time and look at my line,” ’cause I wouldn’t feel quite sure. I’d go down and see that I could do it, and then go back up and get so stressed again. The initial drop without another rider there is really hard.

When I need more energy, motivation, and inspiration, I often take deep breathes and think of Jeff (Anderson) and Josh (Malay). I ask them to help me out-I feel like they do.

Who inspired you?

I’ve looked up to guys like Terje Haakonsen and Johan Oloffson since I started snowboarding, and getting to ride with them now is so crazy. It’s still kind of weird-it’s like, “Whoa, this is Terje right here.” They used be my idols, and now they’re my friends.

The first time I met Terje was such a long time ago, and I actually went to get his autograph. He told me he wasn’t Terje but his twin brother, and I just left-he was totally dissing on me. I met him again while I was riding for Burton and ended up staying at his place in Kaua’i, Hawai’i. It’s a pretty sick place-he’s there right now.

Who’s underrated?

There are a few of them. My friends from Quebec who live in Whistler have a hard time with sponsorships because their names are French. Companies know they’re good but just think they’re not marketable-guys like Gaetan Chanut, Etienne Gilbert, Daniel Migneault, and Guillaume Brochu. Those guys are so good, work so hard, and they don’t get the support.

Someone could be more creative with their marketing.

Totally, I’ve even been asking Burton, “Why don’t you pick up Gaetan? He’s so sick!” They’re like, “No we couldn’t. The name Gaetan Chanut is just not selling.” I’m like, “Okay, that’s f-ked (laughs)!”

He’s so skilled and dedicated, a hard worker, just the whole deal and he’s always switching from one sponsor to another and getting screwed over … I don’t know.

Lucky you have DCP.

Yeah, they made that one up. David Carrier Porcheron-they were not too stoked on that.

Thank someone.

I’d like to start by thanking my family: Denyse, Robert, Raphaelle, Mammy, Siham and Yannis, my aunts and uncles, cousins, the Pischkes and the Sprinkles. Thanks for everything, Megs, and for wanting to be my wife. Family is the best. You learn so much about living, and about yourself, through them. Thanks to my mom, who is a college teacher, for letting me get out of school so easily.

Thanks to all my friends: Nalu, Sly, Gab, Simon, Mit, Ian, Guy, Max2, OLI3, Ricky D, Gogo, ET, EG, Amy and Layne, the O’dowds, Gallants, Alex Auchu, J-F Pelchat, Emilie, Cri, Timi, Phil2, Elie, Alexis, Jo, Rheault, Mignos, Blotto, Brad Kremer, Jussi, Vic, Baba, Kendra, JP Solberg, Romain De Marchi, Gigi Ruff, Trevor Andrew, Shawn, Haakon, Keir, et cetera … you guys are all so inspiring.

Thanks to Al Clark for creating the Brohm ridge scene. Manny Krebs: for the 418, Costa Rica, and for being my big brother; Ely Truchon, for teaching me how to snowboard.

Thanks to my sponsors: Jake, Rene, Dinz, Driscoll, Adam , LG, and the PR and design crew, and everyone at Burton Snowboards-you guys make my life! Thanks to Chris and the crew at Spy Optics, Globe, Brendan and Phil at the Empire shop, Dave Downing, Lindsay, Julie, Gomez, Bob Hurley and Scott Soens at Hurley.

Thanks to everyone I had the chance to work with and will be working with in the future.

more energy, motivation, and inspiration, I often take deep breathes and think of Jeff (Anderson) and Josh (Malay). I ask them to help me out-I feel like they do.

Who inspired you?

I’ve looked up to guys like Terje Haakonsen and Johan Oloffson since I started snowboarding, and getting to ride with them now is so crazy. It’s still kind of weird-it’s like, “Whoa, this is Terje right here.” They used be my idols, and now they’re my friends.

The first time I met Terje was such a long time ago, and I actually went to get his autograph. He told me he wasn’t Terje but his twin brother, and I just left-he was totally dissing on me. I met him again while I was riding for Burton and ended up staying at his place in Kaua’i, Hawai’i. It’s a pretty sick place-he’s there right now.

Who’s underrated?

There are a few of them. My friends from Quebec who live in Whistler have a hard time with sponsorships because their names are French. Companies know they’re good but just think they’re not marketable-guys like Gaetan Chanut, Etienne Gilbert, Daniel Migneault, and Guillaume Brochu. Those guys are so good, work so hard, and they don’t get the support.

Someone could be more creative with their marketing.

Totally, I’ve even been asking Burton, “Why don’t you pick up Gaetan? He’s so sick!” They’re like, “No we couldn’t. The name Gaetan Chanut is just not selling.” I’m like, “Okay, that’s f-ked (laughs)!”

He’s so skilled and dedicated, a hard worker, just the whole deal and he’s always switching from one sponsor to another and getting screwed over … I don’t know.

Lucky you have DCP.

Yeah, they made that one up. David Carrier Porcheron-they were not too stoked on that.

Thank someone.

I’d like to start by thanking my family: Denyse, Robert, Raphaelle, Mammy, Siham and Yannis, my aunts and uncles, cousins, the Pischkes and the Sprinkles. Thanks for everything, Megs, and for wanting to be my wife. Family is the best. You learn so much about living, and about yourself, through them. Thanks to my mom, who is a college teacher, for letting me get out of school so easily.

Thanks to all my friends: Nalu, Sly, Gab, Simon, Mit, Ian, Guy, Max2, OLI3, Ricky D, Gogo, ET, EG, Amy and Layne, the O’dowds, Gallants, Alex Auchu, J-F Pelchat, Emilie, Cri, Timi, Phil2, Elie, Alexis, Jo, Rheault, Mignos, Blotto, Brad Kremer, Jussi, Vic, Baba, Kendra, JP Solberg, Romain De Marchi, Gigi Ruff, Trevor Andrew, Shawn, Haakon, Keir, et cetera … you guys are all so inspiring.

Thanks to Al Clark for creating the Brohm ridge scene. Manny Krebs: for the 418, Costa Rica, and for being my big brother; Ely Truchon, for teaching me how to snowboard.

Thanks to my sponsors: Jake, Rene, Dinz, Driscoll, Adam , LG, and the PR and design crew, and everyone at Burton Snowboards-you guys make my life! Thanks to Chris and the crew at Spy Optics, Globe, Brendan and Phil at the Empire shop, Dave Downing, Lindsay, Julie, Gomez, Bob Hurley and Scott Soens at Hurley.

Thanks to everyone I had the chance to work with and will be working with in the future.