One fine Vancouver summer morning, contributing photographer Scott Serfas began loading up his gear for a day trip to Whistler to shoot a bunch of pro shredders in hopes of selling his stunning images to publications such as this. Scott used to make a living as a plumber, laying pipe, grouting tile, and caulking fixtures for us civilized folk to enjoy. However, he found that standing around in the snow snapping shots of his friends was a much more creative and festive manner to pay the bills.

Anyway, it took him about an hour and a half to pack up the truck, which he diligently locked up after each load. He drove to Whistler, unloaded his truck, and realized his entire camera bag was missing. Son of a bitch! At some point during that hour and a half, a low-life muthaf–ka jimmied the lock and walked off with Scott’s entire life–he had to face his worst nightmare. The most important contents were as follows:

One fifteen mm fisheye

17—35 F2.8 lens

28—70 F2.8 lens

70—200 F2.8 lens

1.5 teleconverter

Minolta light meter

Sony TRV 900 3-Chip video camera with batteries

Miscellaneous batteries, film, cables

Custom Burton photo bag

Of course our friend Scott had auto insurance, but his company refused to help him recover any of the costs to replace his gear. Isn’t that what insurance is for? We guess not in Canada. And, being a struggling snowboard photographer, he hasn’t been able to afford a separate insurance policy for his camera gear.

It’s going to cost Scott around 14,000 dollars to replace his equipment and be able to continue his career. At twenty dollars an hour, it takes a half hour of labor to put in a toilet (wash basins and water closets as they’re know in the plumbing world). That’s 1,400 shitters–definitely not something to look forward to.

If you’d like to find out how to help Scott with this horrible predicament, visit his Web site ScottSerfas.com for details on the great camera-replacement project.