BlacklightStandard Films “An enlightened few are nurtured by the life-giving forces of the dream world.” The cover text tells you what you’re in for. I respect the need for a change-up when making snowboard movies these days-but this is a stretch. All the elements for a quality film exist here, but the production just somehow falls short. Highlights include standout riding from Travis Rice, and smooth moves delivered by Louie Fountain and Tom Gilles. Shin Campos clearly had a good winter, and it’s evident in his part. The guy just makes riding look fun. Euro superstar Stefan Gimpl busts some serious maneuvers, but must get those crazy arms in check. Elan Bushell’s powder lines would have been enjoyable, but someone thought throwing in stop-and-go editing throughout his part might be neat (it was painful). The skits were ineffective at best, and left me ambivalent about the new riders introduced.-C.D.

Seymour SkidsIn the tradition of fine Canadian dereliction, Kevin Sansalone delivers a lighthearted, entertaining romp through Mt. Seymour and the greater Whistler area. It’s not all snow shredding, but it’s not all debauchery, either. Rider parts are short and tight, like they ought to be. And there’re a lot of them-from the Wildcats to pros passing through town, Kev grabbed a shot of everyone. There’s also some skating-Rick McCrank displays his usual prowess, and Rob Boyce performs his token vert backflip. Kevin and Browner shoot each other with piss-filled squirt guns, and there’s nudity-yeah, well, what did you expect? This glorified depiction of the Seymour Kids and friends isn’t the best snowboard film of the year, nor does it pretend to be. However, it’s well done and just may be the funniest.-C.D. This video is not available for resale. If you want to see it, befriend a Canadian.

TranscendenceAbsinthe FilmsIf National Geographic made a snow film, it might look something like Transcendence. Shot in Alaska, as well as abroad in Switzerland, Austria, and Norway, this movie is gorgeous. The focus is freeriding, but there’re plenty of highly technical maneuvers, too. The footage is serious! A largely Euro and Scanner cast really steps things up in the backcountry-standard snowpark moves performed with uncanny precision off cliffs, cornices, and jumps. Riders of note include Axel PauportÇ, Gigi RÅf, Nicolas Muller, Travis Rice, Tina Basich, and Jeremy Jones. J.P. Solberg has a tight style-the kid is sick. This video has no handrails, but it contains a healthy amount of kickers and a surreal look at summer camp. (The USSTC kicker is shot repeatedly from the same angle with various riders, however, and got a little old.) Atypical music selections like The Clash, Radiohead, The Beatles, and Lou Reed do a nice job of setting a mood rather than serving as a distraction. I really like this movie-such a seamless blending of freestyle and freeriding. Isn’t this what snowboarding is all about?-C.D.

True LifeMack Dawg ProductionsConsidering this is Forum propaganda, it may represent only a limited microcosm of today’s snowboarding, but it does a damn good job of building up personalities … which is what a boy band-I mean team video is supposed to do. Beginning with a sober nod to last season’s injured Mikko Sjoblom and Mike Page-it makes a strong statement about the increasing danger riders put themselves in to get a video part every year. Previously out-of-commission Chris Dufficy returns to the shred by jumping into a lot of powder in a segment filled with the kind of riding you dream about in the summertime. Watching Bjorn Leines wreck his ankle again and again on the most demented stunts is like watching John Travolta stab a needle into Uma Thurman’s chest cavity in Pulp Fiction-you want to look away, but somehow you can’t. And JP Walker shows why he is still the man when it comes to street rails by stomping crazy shit on barely a few shovelfuls of snow. True Life is the future of team films-tight crew, tight eding, and tight parts. There really isn’t a shot that’s out of place, and it makes snowboarding look damn fun again.-J.S.

Hardly AngelsXX ProductionsBecause nearly two minutes elapsed before I saw any snowboarding, Hardly Angels lost my attention in the beginning and had a hard time gaining it back. But the actual snowboarding was pretty good, showcasing a lot of the recent female progression on rails, in the pipe, and off jumps. Giving credit to the film’s makers, there weren’t many shots of non-landed tricks or hula-hoop backside 360s-a combination that has plagued the credibility of women’s snowboarding in the past. The Chorus Team section was entertaining. Janna Meyen’s interview is all-time-she’s not the least bit inhibited about the path she took as a youth. Her snowboarding is just as good. Other noteworthy sections are Cara-Beth Burnside skateboarding, Kelly Clark going really big in the pipe, and Nicola Thost ruling. My final conclusion: if this movie’s editing was tightened up, it would be better than okay. Regardless, if you’re a girl, a woman, or a sensitive man, you’ll want to check it out.-Nathan Yant

Commmon Thread4Reel ProductionsIn case you were wondering-Tom Burt is still wearing the white Vaurnet sunglasses. Common Thread features some impressive big-mountain riding by the likes of Burt, Nate Cole, and Karleen Jeffries-Karleen is definitely one of the best women backcountry riders out there. There’s also a bit of gnarly rail wrecking by Nate Holland and a whole lot of “trippy” editing effects. The snowboarding in this video is actually good-heli-boarding in Alaska is always amazing, how can it not be? The pipe contest at the Sims Worlds was off the hook, and the video does a good job of representing that. All in all, Common Thread was okay, and despite an uninspiring soundtrack and one too many crazy editing tricks, it will definitely get you pumped to go ride.-J.S.

Slider Video Magazine Number FourSlide ProjectWhen it comes to snowboard movies, there’s good, entertaining “underground,” and then there’s not-so-good, boring “underground.” Slider Video Mag most often falls into the latter with its random mishmash of footage. To be fair, the film does showcase much the progressive riding that went down on the contest circuit last season-from the mayhem at the G-Shock Air And Style to Tom Gilles’ huge air to fakie at the U.S. Open quarterpipe. But it moves from a rail session with Joni Malmi in Lapland to some Colorado loc-dogs ripping the Vail park to a few shots from New Hampshire’s famed Blue Lodge without any cohesive flow. And while none of these elements are bad on their own, the randomness gets tiring really fast. There wasn’t even any good party footage, for chrissakes. My advice-tighten it up so you can better appreciate the footage that did make the cut.-J.S.

UnleashedStraight Jacket FilmsUnleashed is the debut effort from Straight Jacket Films, the new production company started by Todd Hazeltine and former Mack Dawg filmer Kurt Heine. It features a mental-institution theme, which thankfully (in the interest of time) only rears its head on a few occasions. This video plays like a Mammoth promo, with footage of nearly every rider who calls the area home. With the 90 or so different people in the film, you’d think there would be a plethora of locations-but no, everything was filmed at one of five spots (three of which are at Mammoth). Nevertheless, the snowboarding itself makes this video worth a viewing-with an incredible showcase of rail tricks, including one flip and a ton of spins, and Tom Gilles’ completion of the infamous snow loop. Just watch it on mute, because it has enough of The Line to be a Volcom video, and enough bad metal to be from the 80s.-Brook Geery

Stand and DeliverMack Dawg ProductionsHave you ever woken up in the morning and thought, “Today, I’d like to see Trevor Andrew turn into a dog Ö la Snoop video?” Well, dream no more, because this is finally realized in Stand And Deliver. It’s no secret that Mack Dawg has a few years of experience under his belt-and it shows. Although somewhat formulaic (big jumps + rails + cool snowboarders + hip-hop and punk = snowboard movie), it still works by capturing the most progressive riders. In addition to Trevor’s canine part, Shaun White macks on some thirteen-year-old girls and annihilates Bob Burnquist’s backyard ramp amidst impressive snowboarding footage. Kevin Jones proves he gets free boards by throwing one of his into a tree. And Tara Dakides is obviously not afraid of Aqua Net-she also shows off her massive trick repertoire. I didn’t want to like this video, but I couldn’t help it. When an explosion ended it, I was disappointed to see the credits start rolling.-B.G.

Burton’s European Summer TourThroughout this video’s twenty-minute running time, you witness little more than a play-by-play ” … and then we went here.” The cuts are sloppy and the angles are bad, with party footage so clichÇd it isn’t even entertaining (and inebriated Euros should always be entertaining!). The majority of the shots are from contests or Burton product photo shoots and looked pirated, like the filmer wasn’t allowed to be there. Perhaps some of the best were captured when the camera was accidentally left on. European Summer Tour also makes the assumption that you follow Burton’s European Team closely enough to know all the boys on a first-name basis. Rather than the classic rider segments, it has location parts and is one long montage. It reminded me of the Board With The World series, which boasted as its claim to fame, “Snowboarding on the side of an active volcano!” Like that video, watch this one for the pretty scenery and one very impressive roof drop, but not much else.-B.G.

The EmpireXodus ProductionsIt’s easy to enjoy the riding in this one, if only because the music sucks so bad (with the exception of Eris). The highlights include solid shredding from Eddie Wall, Vic Lowrance, Kyle Clancy, Bobi Rey, and Mark Reilly. It’s cool that the video features mostly hungry young riders, and it also has a good mix of pipe, kickers, rails, and park jumps. But The Empire does suffer from a lack of terrain variety. The river gap and the flaming handrail are sweet, though. If you can put up with the mainly shred-rock soundtrack, you’ll like it.-J.M.

BrainstormKingpin ProductionsSlayer’s “Behind The Crooked Cross” on the soundtrack is enough to put this video on top of box-office charts this season-but there’s a lot more going on in Producer Whitey’s world. This snowboard movie has balls. Heavyweight parts from many top riders ensure that Brainstorm will get strong rotation in your VCR. There’s Scotty Wittlake, J2 Rasmus, Chad Otterstrom, AC/DC, The Who-what’s not to like?Everybody’s got some goods in their respective segments, but Mikey LeBlanc, David Carrier Porcheron, and Josh Dirksen really let it rip. Lukas Huffman delivers-making other riders look like they’re in slow motion. This film has a bit of a scrapbook feeling to it, sort of like the old vids, not too serious, and perfect for getting amped to schralp.-J.M.

RepresentFinger On Da Trigger ProductionsThis film takes things back to yesteryear when snowboarding was ill and fools were keeping it real. If you’re tired of overproduced snowboard movies that are dry, have wack soundtracks, and played-out skits, then you’ll want to check out Represent. There’s a gang of riders both well known and not, who all succesfully “represent” what the f-k’s up right now. The slams are sick … literally-heads smacking the concrete, hyper-extended scorpions, and kids getting broken off on rails. The digi footage comprising most of this movie is rough-even shaky at times, and although it’s not as illustrious as its 16mm counterpart, it still does a decent job of capturing the action. What more than makes up for anything this film lacks is the music. It’s amazing how good a snowboarding movie soundtrack can bed And Deliver. It’s no secret that Mack Dawg has a few years of experience under his belt-and it shows. Although somewhat formulaic (big jumps + rails + cool snowboarders + hip-hop and punk = snowboard movie), it still works by capturing the most progressive riders. In addition to Trevor’s canine part, Shaun White macks on some thirteen-year-old girls and annihilates Bob Burnquist’s backyard ramp amidst impressive snowboarding footage. Kevin Jones proves he gets free boards by throwing one of his into a tree. And Tara Dakides is obviously not afraid of Aqua Net-she also shows off her massive trick repertoire. I didn’t want to like this video, but I couldn’t help it. When an explosion ended it, I was disappointed to see the credits start rolling.-B.G.

Burton’s European Summer TourThroughout this video’s twenty-minute running time, you witness little more than a play-by-play ” … and then we went here.” The cuts are sloppy and the angles are bad, with party footage so clichÇd it isn’t even entertaining (and inebriated Euros should always be entertaining!). The majority of the shots are from contests or Burton product photo shoots and looked pirated, like the filmer wasn’t allowed to be there. Perhaps some of the best were captured when the camera was accidentally left on. European Summer Tour also makes the assumption that you follow Burton’s European Team closely enough to know all the boys on a first-name basis. Rather than the classic rider segments, it has location parts and is one long montage. It reminded me of the Board With The World series, which boasted as its claim to fame, “Snowboarding on the side of an active volcano!” Like that video, watch this one for the pretty scenery and one very impressive roof drop, but not much else.-B.G.

The EmpireXodus ProductionsIt’s easy to enjoy the riding in this one, if only because the music sucks so bad (with the exception of Eris). The highlights include solid shredding from Eddie Wall, Vic Lowrance, Kyle Clancy, Bobi Rey, and Mark Reilly. It’s cool that the video features mostly hungry young riders, and it also has a good mix of pipe, kickers, rails, and park jumps. But The Empire does suffer from a lack of terrain variety. The river gap and the flaming handrail are sweet, though. If you can put up with the mainly shred-rock soundtrack, you’ll like it.-J.M.

BrainstormKingpin ProductionsSlayer’s “Behind The Crooked Cross” on the soundtrack is enough to put this video on top of box-office charts this season-but there’s a lot more going on in Producer Whitey’s world. This snowboard movie has balls. Heavyweight parts from many top riders ensure that Brainstorm will get strong rotation in your VCR. There’s Scotty Wittlake, J2 Rasmus, Chad Otterstrom, AC/DC, The Who-what’s not to like?Everybody’s got some goods in their respective segments, but Mikey LeBlanc, David Carrier Porcheron, and Josh Dirksen really let it rip. Lukas Huffman delivers-making other riders look like they’re in slow motion. This film has a bit of a scrapbook feeling to it, sort of like the old vids, not too serious, and perfect for getting amped to schralp.-J.M.

RepresentFinger On Da Trigger ProductionsThis film takes things back to yesteryear when snowboarding was ill and fools were keeping it real. If you’re tired of overproduced snowboard movies that are dry, have wack soundtracks, and played-out skits, then you’ll want to check out Represent. There’s a gang of riders both well known and not, who all succesfully “represent” what the f-k’s up right now. The slams are sick … literally-heads smacking the concrete, hyper-extended scorpions, and kids getting broken off on rails. The digi footage comprising most of this movie is rough-even shaky at times, and although it’s not as illustrious as its 16mm counterpart, it still does a decent job of capturing the action. What more than makes up for anything this film lacks is the music. It’s amazing how good a snowboarding movie soundtrack can be when nobody’s worried about getting rights to any of the songs they use.-N.Y.

Rider’s EdThe Essential Snowboarding InstructionalIf you’re uncoordinated and scared of trying something new without first reading about it, developing a hypothesis, and finding out the probability of injury, then Rider’s Ed is right up your narrow little alley-with major emphasis on dressing properly, choosing the right boots and board, and basic starter techniques. At times it’s corny and downright weak, but if you’ve always wanted to learn the proper way to get off the chairlift, mimic a falling leaf while cruising down the hill, or learn to snowboard from someone in West Virginia, then Rider’s Ed is about you.-N.Y.

Still Struggling IIAlterna Action FilmsThe name says it all. Maybe the producer should have chosen a more optimistic title, such as Still Killing It. This movie is primarily filmed in the Great White North at locations many of us have become familiar with in the past-Mt. Seymour and Whistler/Blackomb. Unfortunately, most of the booters are pint sized (apart from some park kickers). Jon Cartwright, Etienne Gilbert, and Kevin Sansalone all have pretty good parts, along with some not-so-well-known Canadians. There’s a lot of contest footage, and short segments of some big-name shreds bring the riding up a notch or two.-N.Y.

TB10: OptigrabStandard FilmsWith Mike Hatchett’s clean direction and filming, Optigrab lives up to the TB series’ reputation. The normal barrage of talent is slimmer this time, and the overall production is tighter than ever. The film still showcases riding from the top, such as Chris Engelsman, David Benedek, Travis Parker, Johan Olofsson, Andrew Crawford, and Jussi Oksanen-all in worldwide locations from Utah to Norway. It covers the full scope of snowboarding, with insane helmet-cam footage of Jeremy Jones’ hair-raising Alaskan descents, backcountry freestyle attacks from Lukas Huffman and Joni Makinen, and the technical rail skills of Bobby Meeks.Hatchett takes a step in a new direction this year, and the movie reflects this different visual aesthetic. There’s more of a focus on dynamic angles and editing and less on narration and story telling. This revamped formula makes Optigrab one of the most exciting movies to watch this year.And if you haven’t had enough action by the end of the flick, fast forward to the secret section after the credits. It includes bonus footage of the Standard crew dorking around, and it features the directorial and acting debut of Travis Parker in an incredible film about his two favorite fingers.-Jesse Huffman

TriumphThe Gathering CollectiveTriumph is the second offering from the French-Canadian Gathering Collective. The film is packed with the talents of Whistler’s lesser-known riders, such as Jesse Fox, David Melancon, Craig Balantyne, Martin Gallant, Alex Auchu, and Etienne Tremblay, as well as British Columbia pros David Carrier-Porcheron, Gaetan Chanut, and Mike Page.All the footage is digital, but what the video lacks in production quality it makes up for in quality riding. Triumph is 40 minutes of raw freestyle madness perpetrated mostly on Whistler and Blackcomb Mountain and the surrounding backcountry, with additional segments filmed on the East Coast and in the parks of California. The Gathering crew throws down on everything from cliffs to kickers, park jumps, and rails. Set to a soundtrack of hip-hop and heavy metal, this video has everything you need to rock out and get your shred on.-Jesse Huffman

411 Video Magazine, Snow Issue ThreeSnow Issue Three continues to document sick snowboarding along with the people and places behind the riding. This issue has a Chad Otterstrom Profile, Mt. Baker Spot Check, Sean Teadore check out, a report from the opening of Aspen Mountain to snowboarding, contest chaos from around the world, a Day In The Life with Kevin Jones, and bonus footage from Absinthe Films. 411 brings you coverage of many pros you might not see in the other huge movie productionss-featuring local riders and footage of ams stepping it up. The Day In The Life follows Kevin through a regular day that leads up to the incredible throw down of the Sims World Championship big-air contest. 411 comes through again with excellent snowboarding and coverage of the lifestyle behind the scenes.-Jesse Huffman

LocsPeak Feeners Mountain MediaJackson Hole is probably one of the only locations that can support an entire movie without the terrain looking played out. Locs is filled with 35 minutes of powder, chutes, and cliff drops all filmed in and around the Wyoming resort. The film is mostly skiing, with shred appearances from such locals as Lance Pitman, Bryan Iguchi, and Jason Elms, and if you’ve ever been to the area, you’d know that the people who live there do rip. While most of the shredders have pretty short parts, Pitman’s segment has everything from freestyle kicker action to pillow lines. But one point of frustration is that while the filming and film quality is good throughout the video (i.e., the skiers’ sections), Bryan and Lance’s parts look completely overexposed. All in all, this film was a good portrayal of the incredible snow slaying that happens in Jackson and will make you wish you spent more time there last season.-J.S.

Desired EffectMarco Lutz ProductionForget snowboard video, Desired Effect is a real movie. Filled with expensive stunts Ö la Birdhouse’s The End, this film has exploding cars and a choreographed fight scene involving a stripper and a WWF wrestler. The snowboarding’s pretty sweet, too, with a Euro and Canadian shred cast riding all types of terrain in between groundbreaking acting debuts. Brett Capentier and Marco Lutz get the all-time funnest-looking powder lines, while Jon Cartwright and others hit huge park kickers at the SPC camp in Hintertux. At times the skits are a bit long and leave you antsy for more actual snowboarding, but the movie definitely doesn’t skimp on the entertainment factor.-J.S.en nobody’s worried about getting rights to any of the songs they use.-N.Y.

Rider’s EdThe Essential Snowboarding InstructionalIf you’re uncoordinated and scared of trying something new without first reading about it, developing a hypothesis, and finding out the probability of injury, then Rider’s Ed is right up your narrow little alley-with major emphasis on dressing properly, choosing the right boots and board, and basic starter techniques. At times it’s corny and downright weak, but if you’ve always wanted to learn the proper way to get off the chairlift, mimic a falling leaf while cruising down the hill, or learn to snowboard from someone in West Virginia, then Rider’s Ed is about you.-N.Y.

Still Struggling IIAlterna Action FilmsThe name says it all. Maybe the producer should have chosen a more optimistic title, such as Still Killing It. This movie is primarily filmed in the Great White North at locations many of us have become familiar with in the past-Mt. Seymour and Whistler/Blackomb. Unfortunately, most of the booters are pint sized (apart from some park kickers). Jon Cartwright, Etienne Gilbert, and Kevin Sansalone all have pretty good parts, along with some not-so-well-known Canadians. There’s a lot of contest footage, and short segments of some big-name shreds bring the riding up a notch or two.-N.Y.

TB10: OptigrabStandard FilmsWith Mike Hatchett’s clean direction and filming, Optigrab lives up to the TB series’ reputation. The normal barrage of talent is slimmer this time, and the overall production is tighter than ever. The film still showcases riding from the top, such as Chris Engelsman, David Benedek, Travis Parker, Johan Olofsson, Andrew Crawford, and Jussi Oksanen-all in worldwide locations from Utah to Norway. It covers the full scope of snowboarding, with insane helmet-cam footage of Jeremy Jones’ hair-raising Alaskan descents, backcountry freestyle attacks from Lukas Huffman and Joni Makinen, and the technical rail skills of Bobby Meeks.Hatchett takes a step in a new direction this year, and the movie reflects this different visual aesthetic. There’s more of a focus on dynamic angles and editing and less on narration and story telling. This revamped formula makes Optigrab one of the most exciting movies to watch this year.And if you haven’t had enough action by the end of the flick, fast forward to the secret section after the credits. It includes bonus footage of the Standard crew dorking around, and it features the directorial and acting debut of Travis Parker in an incredible film about his two favorite fingers.-Jesse Huffman

TriumphThe Gathering CollectiveTriumph is the second offering from the French-Canadian Gathering Collective. The film is packed with the talents of Whistler’s lesser-known riders, such as Jesse Fox, David Melancon, Craig Balantyne, Martin Gallant, Alex Auchu, and Etienne Tremblay, as well as British Columbia pros David Carrier-Porcheron, Gaetan Chanut, and Mike Page.All the footage is digital, but what the video lacks in production quality it makes up for in quality riding. Triumph is 40 minutes of raw freestyle madness perpetrated mostly on Whistler and Blackcomb Mountain and the surrounding backcountry, with additional segments filmed on the East Coast and in the parks of California. The Gathering crew throws down on everything from cliffs to kickers, park jumps, and rails. Set to a soundtrack of hip-hop and heavy metal, this video has everything you need to rock out and get your shred on.-Jesse Huffman

411 Video Magazine, Snow Issue ThreeSnow Issue Three continues to document sick snowboarding along with the people and places behind the riding. This issue has a Chad Otterstrom Profile, Mt. Baker Spot Check, Sean Teadore check out, a report from the opening of Aspen Mountain to snowboarding, contest chaos from around the world, a Day In The Life with Kevin Jones, and bonus footage from Absinthe Films. 411 brings you coverage of many pros you might not see in the other huge movie productions-featuring local riders and footage of ams stepping it up. The Day In The Life follows Kevin through a regular day that leads up to the incredible throw down of the Sims World Championship big-air contest. 411 comes through again with excellent snowboarding and coverage of the lifestyle behind the scenes.-Jesse Huffman

LocsPeak Feeners Mountain MediaJackson Hole is probably one of the only locations that can support an entire movie without the terrain looking played out. Locs is filled with 35 minutes of powder, chutes, and cliff drops all filmed in and around the Wyoming resort. The film is mostly skiing, with shred appearances from such locals as Lance Pitman, Bryan Iguchi, and Jason Elms, and if you’ve ever been to the area, you’d know that the people who live there do rip. While most of the shredders have pretty short parts, Pitman’s segment has everything from freestyle kicker action to pillow lines. But one point of frustration is that while the filming and film quality is good throughout the video (i.e., the skiers’ sections), Bryan and Lance’s parts look completely overexposed. All in all, this film was a good portrayal of the incredible snow slaying that happens in Jackson and will make you wish you spent more time there last season.-J.S.

Desired EffectMarco Lutz ProductionForget snowboard video, Desired Effect is a real movie. Filled with expensive stunts Ö la Birdhouse’s The End, this film has exploding cars and a choreographed fight scene involving a stripper and a WWF wrestler. The snowboarding’s pretty sweet, too, with a Euro and Canadian shred cast riding all types of terrain in between groundbreaking acting debuts. Brett Capentier and Marco Lutz get the all-time funnest-looking powder lines, while Jon Cartwright and others hit huge park kickers at the SPC camp in Hintertux. At times the skits are a bit long and leave you antsy for more actual snowboarding, but the movie definitely doesn’t skimp on the entertainment factor.-J.S. the other huge movie productions-featuring local riders and footage of ams stepping it up. The Day In The Life follows Kevin through a regular day that leads up to the incredible throw down of the Sims World Championship big-air contest. 411 comes through again with excellent snowboarding and coverage of the lifestyle behind the scenes.-Jesse Huffman

LocsPeak Feeners Mountain MediaJackson Hole is probably one of the only locations that can support an entire movie without the terrain looking played out. Locs is filled with 35 minutes of powder, chutes, and cliff drops all filmed in and around the Wyoming resort. The film is mostly skiing, with shred appearances from such locals as Lance Pitman, Bryan Iguchi, and Jason Elms, and if you’ve ever been to the area, you’d know that the people who live there do rip. While most of the shredders have pretty short parts, Pitman’s segment has everything from freestyle kicker action to pillow lines. But one point of frustration is that while the filming and film quality is good throughout the video (i.e., the skiers’ sections), Bryan and Lance’s parts look completely overexposed. All in all, this film was a good portrayal of the incredible snow slaying that happens in Jackson and will make you wish you spent more time there last season.-J.S.

Desired EffectMarco Lutz ProductionForget snowboard video, Desired Effect is a real movie. Filled with expensive stunts Ö la Birdhouse’s The End, this film has exploding cars and a choreographed fight scene involving a stripper and a WWF wrestler. The snowboarding’s pretty sweet, too, with a Euro and Canadian shred cast riding all types of terrain in between groundbreaking acting debuts. Brett Capentier and Marco Lutz get the all-time funnest-looking powder lines, while Jon Cartwright and others hit huge park kickers at the SPC camp in Hintertux. At times the skits are a bit long and leave you antsy for more actual snowboarding, but the movie definitely doesn’t skimp on the entertainment factor.-J.S.