SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (Sept. 18, 2003) — There is no “snoozing” and”losing” at Utah’s 13 mountain resorts. The winter sport Mecca continuesto hone, polish, create, add, build, renovate and revise its equipment,amenities, facilities, products and programs. Utah’s 13 mountain resortshave invested millions of dollars in on-mountain improvements thisseason, from expanding lodges to creating new ski school clinics, toopening new terrain parks. Here’s what’s new this season:

BRIAN HEAD RESORT: Brian Head is offering a brand new “Step It Up”clinic series this season. Both “Terrain Park” and “Rip it Up” clinicsare offered in the series, for children ages 8 to 17. The Terrain Parkclinic teaches park etiquette and safety as well as instruction onlearning basic jumps, grabs and handling rails. Student requirements arethat snowboarders must be able to make toe and tail turns at anintermediate level and make basic switch turns. Skiers must be able tocomfortably make parallel turns on blue runs. “Rip It Up” clinicparticipants will tear up the whole mountain, cruising bumps, crud,powder, gates, steeps and whatever else looks like fun. Studentrequirements include being able to comfortably ride and/or ski parallelon blue runs. Clinics are held on Saturdays and holidays and last twohours long. Start times are based on demand.

THE CANYONS: Skiers looking for The Canyons’ award-winning terrain parkin 2003-04 will find it at a new location and at a higher elevation -providing more consistent natural snowfall assisted by a new snowmakingsystem for the park. Freeskiers and riders will access the new park bySnow Canyon Express where they will find more than 30 featuresthroughout the 16-acre park. On-mountain dining takes a step up at TheCanyons Resort. Lookout Cabin will now feature a new, full-service barwithin the restaurant — Located a top Lookout Peak, Lookout Cabinprovides stunning views of the Wasatch along with table-served mealsdaily.

Back by popular demand, The Canyons Resort features the Utah Honor RollPass. The first of its kind, the Honor Roll Pass rewards students fortheir scholastic achievements with the resort’s most affordable SeasonPass. Junior High and High School students at participating schools inUtah who have made the honor roll for their most recently completedgrading period are eligible to purchase a $99 Season Pass. This marksthe 5th year for the program which has received accolades from parentsand teachers alike. Honor Roll Students in Summit and Wasatch Countiesare eligible for a $55 Season Pass at The Canyons.

New this year for those skiing The Canyons early in the season is theEarly Bird Ski Free Package. Stay at The Canyons Resort (at the SundialLodge or Grand Summit Resort Hotel) between Nov. 21 and Dec. 25 and skifor free. Two lift tickets are included in the lodging rates per night.Prices start at $159 for the Sundial Lodge, and $189 for the GrandSummit. Restrictions may apply, based on availability.

PARK CITY MOUNTAIN RESORT: Park City Mountain Resort celebrates its 40thanniversary during the 2003-04 season. This historic milestone will bedocumented with a commemorative book produced by Mountain Sports Press,the book publishing arm of SKI and SKIING magazines, and written bylong-time Park City local, Larry Warren. New improvements for theupcoming anniversary season include the addition of a 5,000 square-footdeck to the Summit House Restaurant, offering natural warmth andspectacular views. In an effort to continually enhance their terrain theResort purchased additional grooming machines, including a winch cat togroom steep black diamond runs like Double Jack. The Resort’s new SuperDragon will continue to cut the Olympic-quality Eagle Superpipe, wherehistory was made when Americans swept the 2002 Olympic men’s halfpipecompetition. Additional Fast Tracks access gates have been installedallowing special access to express lanes at the Resort’s most popularlifts for Fast Tracks access pass holders.

OWBASIN RESORT: Snowbasin will be operating a new terrain park thisseason, with separate areas provided for beginner/intermediate andadvanced skiers/riders. Each of the two areas provides rails, table topsand jumps of various sizes and models.

SNOWBIRD SKI AND SUMMER RESORT: Snowbird’s snowmaking department usedthe summer to expand the resort’s snowmaking capacity to include theRegulator Johnson run on the upper mountain. The resort’s terrain parkswent through a major expansion during the 2002-03 season, and it’s notover yet. Plans for The Baby Thunder Terrain Park for the season callfor the addition of more features. The intermediate terrain park on BigEmma will expand with the addition of more rails, a mailbox, tabletopsand jumps. To enable an earlier opening of the halfpipe and intermediateterrain park, the halfpipe was constructed of dirt. Snow permitting, theBig Emma Terrain Park and nearby halfpipe will open by late December. Inconjunction with Utah’s Backcountry Awareness Week, Snowbird will hostthe first annual Backcountry Weekend Jan. 23-25, 2004. A fundraisingdinner with a silent auction and backcountry presentation begins theweekend at Snowbird, and two days of classes, demonstrations andentertainment follow. Class topics include snow pack prediction,backcountry access points, equipment information and backcountrypreparation. The resort has added a Kids’ Freeride camp to its MountainSchool camps, providing kids the opportunity to improve their bigmountain riding and sharpen their skills in the more technical park andpipe. Half of the camp is devoted to mountain riding and the other halfto park and pipe. The camp features a night spent eating pizza, watchinga movie, and discussing new gear with a high profile skier or rider.Lunch is included every day, and an avalanche presentation and videosessions are also scheduled. Youth ages 10-17 are invited to participatein the camp, which runs Feb. 18-20, 2004. A new handle tow has beeninstalled on Snowbird’s Big Emma run. The handle tow will expandSnowbird’s beginner terrain and enable skiers and riders in the earlystages of the sport to enjoy more of Snowbird’s 2,500 skiable acres.

SOLITUDE MOUNTAIN RESORT: Solitude has a new “family-friendly” terrainpark, built with fun in mind for everyone. The goal of the park is tohave an area where everyone feels welcome, young and old — first time ora veteran — whether on snowboard or skis. Most of the features are snowbased (no steel structures) and are a manageable size for all riders.Another unique feature will be a sitting area for families to take abreak from the action. The park is located in gentle terrain and willbe accessible from four of eight lifts. Solitude is also pleased toreport that after eight years of planning, development and construction,the Village at Solitude Mountain Resort is complete. The village is apedestrian only, European-style community, giving visitors a sense ofbeing in the old-world. There are fine and family dining options aswell as a private club to entertain the après-ski crowds. And, ClubSolitude is a sanctuary for those looking to unwind from a day ofoutdoor activities. The Club features an outdoor pool, billiard roomand a mini-theater. Solitude celebrates the 10th anniversary of LeifGrevles’ directorship of Solitude’s Snow Sports Academy. A ski schoolveteran and Norwegian native, Leif came to Utah from Vail and has neverlooked back, developing a unique and successful school in Big CottonwoodCanyon. The academy offers programs for all levels and ages and is theonly resort in the state to offer instruction in all four snowsportdisciplines (alpine skiing, snowboarding, telemark and Nordic skiing).The unique facility offers everything under one roof, from registrationand rentals to lift tickets, and is committed to providing guests of theschool a fun and hassle free environment. Solitude’s new Honeycomb Lift(opened during the 2002-03 season) opened up 400 acres of the mostaccessible free-riding terrain in the country. Locals and visitorsalike call Honeycomb’s terrain off the new lift, “a backcountryexperience without the transceivers and trekking.” The new lift alsoeliminates the long run out on the cat-track providing more time on themountain and a user-friendly return for snowboarders.

SUNDANCE: New this year, Sundance presents Performance Skiing Labs. Thefirst lab, “The Art of Skiing,” held Jan. 10—22, urges skiers toexperience sport as art as this three day lab takes participants’ skiingto the next level, using the experiential approach that has inspiredSundance filmmakers. Sundance provides the place for skiers to challengethemselves with instruction from Jerry Warren, Sundance’s skilledmountain operations director. This workshop takes place during theannual Sundance Film Festival, which provides a distinctive culturalelement. Participants can find additional inspiration with a Sundancescreening in its intimate screening room, followed by a discussion withthe film director. Other Ski Performance Labs include the”Leadership/Coaching Skiing Lab” Feb. 11-13, geared toward corporategroups. The lab is geared from intermediate to advanced skiers andemploys leadership skills that ensure success whether on the hill on inthe boardroom. Participants of the ski lab will also be able to attend aSundance cultural event. The “K2 Technology Performance Skiing Lab,”March 5-7, is for advanced intermediate to expert level skiers. K2,one of the industry’s premiere equipment companies, offers theopportunity to ski some of the world’s best terrain on the world’s bestskis. Equipment, mechanical alignment and skiing alignment will greatlystrengthen the skiing performance of each participant. Each lab providesa cultural component, Sundance’s exquisite food and world-class lodgingfor an inclusive price of $1,533 (meals include tax and gratuity); or$933 without lodging. Sundance is also opening a new retail shop,Sundance Mountain Outfitters, offering ski and snowboard rentals andretail. Rental products include K2, Fischer and Solomon Skis andRossignol snowboards. Retail includes K2 and Fischer skis, as well asski apparel, boots, poles, gloves and sundry items. In addition, theSundance On Snow Demo Center will feature top-of-the-line K2 skis at thebase of Arrowhead Lift daily throughout the ski season.

For more information on Utah’s 13 mountain resorts and daily snowreports, call Ski Utah at (800)754-8824 or visit the newly-redesignedskiutah.com. le free-riding terrain in the country. Locals and visitorsalike call Honeycomb’s terrain off the new lift, “a backcountryexperience without the transceivers and trekking.” The new lift alsoeliminates the long run out on the cat-track providing more time on themountain and a user-friendly return for snowboarders.

SUNDANCE: New this year, Sundance presents Performance Skiing Labs. Thefirst lab, “The Art of Skiing,” held Jan. 10—22, urges skiers toexperience sport as art as this three day lab takes participants’ skiingto the next level, using the experiential approach that has inspiredSundance filmmakers. Sundance provides the place for skiers to challengethemselves with instruction from Jerry Warren, Sundance’s skilledmountain operations director. This workshop takes place during theannual Sundance Film Festival, which provides a distinctive culturalelement. Participants can find additional inspiration with a Sundancescreening in its intimate screening room, followed by a discussion withthe film director. Other Ski Performance Labs include the”Leadership/Coaching Skiing Lab” Feb. 11-13, geared toward corporategroups. The lab is geared from intermediate to advanced skiers andemploys leadership skills that ensure success whether on the hill on inthe boardroom. Participants of the ski lab will also be able to attend aSundance cultural event. The “K2 Technology Performance Skiing Lab,”March 5-7, is for advanced intermediate to expert level skiers. K2,one of the industry’s premiere equipment companies, offers theopportunity to ski some of the world’s best terrain on the world’s bestskis. Equipment, mechanical alignment and skiing alignment will greatlystrengthen the skiing performance of each participant. Each lab providesa cultural component, Sundance’s exquisite food and world-class lodgingfor an inclusive price of $1,533 (meals include tax and gratuity); or$933 without lodging. Sundance is also opening a new retail shop,Sundance Mountain Outfitters, offering ski and snowboard rentals andretail. Rental products include K2, Fischer and Solomon Skis andRossignol snowboards. Retail includes K2 and Fischer skis, as well asski apparel, boots, poles, gloves and sundry items. In addition, theSundance On Snow Demo Center will feature top-of-the-line K2 skis at thebase of Arrowhead Lift daily throughout the ski season.

For more information on Utah’s 13 mountain resorts and daily snowreports, call Ski Utah at (800)754-8824 or visit the newly-redesignedskiutah.com.