Jeff Brushie

Born?

April 14, 1971 in New Britain, Connecticut.

Started riding?

In 1986 on a sledding hill in a Hinesburg, Vermont, trailer park where I lived.

First board?

A Burton Elite 140.

How did you get into snowboarding?

Back in 1985 I saw one of Burton’s first ads in a BMX magazine I had, and it looked like so much fun that I asked for a board for Christmas.

Describe your first day riding?

I couldn’t steer–I just remember going straight down the fall-line toward trees! I couldn’t go the direction I wanted for the first couple days.

What’s your first memory of Terje?

I think it might’ve been back at one of the Breckenridge Swatch World Championships and he was really, really young. He wasn’t schooling everyone quite yet, but you definitely said to yourself, “Who is this little kid?”

What’s one thing you hope you’ve accomplished or will accomplish during your snowboarding career?

I’m just glad I came as far as I did I and make a living doing something I love. Not too many people get that option in life, so I’m definitely lucky to have done that.

What would you call your best moment in snowboarding?

Probably winning an overall halfpipe tour. Like either the World Cup back in ’91 or maybe one of the U.S. tours where I won a truck. Who knows? Maybe just being all alone at the top of an untouched football-field-wide shoot in Argentina with chest-deep powder and dropping in for some of the best turns ever!

How would your life be different if you hadn’t gotten into snowboarding?

It probably wouldn’t be as good. I would probably work at McDonald’s. In fact, I would probably be a manager at McDonald’s by now! But who knows?

What do you respect about other riders?

I respect riders–regardless of their riding level–who are nice people! There’s nothin’ like a good person you can trust. Someone who isn’t a shit-talker–too many jealous-ass cool-guy shit-talkers these days, just talkin’ shit because they don’t got what other people have.

What makes someone a good snowboarder?

A combination of a positive head on your shoulders–which I always had a hard time keepingyou got to want it, great balance, and balls!

Why do you think you’re on this list?

I don’t know why I’m on the list. Maybe because Terje and I always had going big in common.

How would you like future snowboarders to remember you?

Just being a cool person!

Is there a certain photo that represents you and your riding?

Probably the one Jon Foster photo from that U.S. Open that was in TransWorld this year–the frontside air in the pipe. Or just going big like I’ve always loved to do–not worrying about being all technical or anything … just enjoying myself doing what I like to do the most.

One piece of advice for up-and-coming riders?

Grow some big-ass balls because you got to get nutty to be someone these days! Try to keep it as safe as you can, though–try to stay in control. If you want it bad enough you can get it.

What does it mean to you to have a place in the history of snowboarding–to have been a part of it all?

It’s great! But is also means that people think you’re old-school. But remember–everyone will be looked at as old-school after a few years go by. And boy, does time fly. It all comes down to if you still ride well after those few good years. A lot of people just seem to give up and get out of the whole sport when they get a little older and you never see them again. I’ll always ride because it’s what I like to do.

What’s the biggest misconception you think people have about you?

They think I’m an asshole because I’m quiet andon’t talk much. But I’m actually a very nice person to anyone who’s cool to me.

Who would be on your list of the ten best riders ever?

Oh, jeez. Only ten? That’s not being fair to so many people! But oh well, I guess life isn’t fair.

Terje, Mike Michalchuck, Daniel Franck, Todd Richards, Ingemar Backman, Johan Olofsson, Ross Powers, Peter Line, Craig Kelly–one of the first rulers, and Terry Kidwell–the first rider I ever looked up to.

Tom Burt

Born?

Fort Benning, Georgia 1964 on an army base.

Started riding?

The 1982/83 season at Mount Rose, Nevada.

First board?

The first board I rode was a plastic Sims with a Loni Toff skate deck. The first board I actually owned was a gold Sims 150 cm that I bought from Bob Klein for 50 bucks.

How did you get into snowboarding?

Bob Klein, Terry Kidwell, Allen Armbruster were all in my junior high and high school class. They snowboarded so I saw it through them.

Describe your first day riding?

I hiked up, put my work boots under the bungee cord that held your feet to the skate deck, started down the hill and fell on my ass. Then I realized I had to lean forward, so I got back on and leaned forward, linked ten turns and I was hooked. Of course it was perfect pow.

What’s one thing you hope you’ve accomplished or will accomplish during your snowboarding career?

Keep smiling, and enjoying all the mountains that I can in my life.

What would you call your best moment in snowboarding if you had to single one out?

The last powder turn!

How would your life be different if you hadn’t gotten into snowboarding?

I’d probably be a teacher, but I would still be out in the mountains. I wouldn’t have had the ability to travel to as many mountains as I have now.

What do you respect about other riders?

Talent and attitude. It doesn’t matter who or style of riding. If I’m anywhere and I see someone who rips and they love snowboarding, they’re respected.

What makes someone a good snowboarder?

Raw talent, the drive to use it, and the brains to control it.

Why do you think you’re on this list?

I love to snowboard, I love the mountains, I like to learn about snow, and speed is my friend.

How would you like future snowboarders to remember you?

Tom Burt died with a smile on his face.

One piece of advice for up-and-coming riders?

Love it and it will happen.

What does it mean to you to have a place in the history of snowboarding–to have been a part of it all?

I’m one lucky bastard who was at the right place at the right time and had a chance to let others see the mountains how I like to play in them.

What’s the biggest misconception you think people have about you?

I can’t grab my board?

Who would be on your list of the ten best riders ever?

Terry Kidwell–father of freestyle, Shaun Palmer–overall natural talent and actor, Craig Kelly–style in all, Terje–best in all, Damian Sanders–big air style, Noah Salasnek–best freestyle and mountain style, Peter Line–new big technical air, Jim Zellers–backcountry and big mountain.

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Shawn Farmer–most real, Andy Hetzel–still charging, Jim Rippey–just going for it, Jose Fernadez–first European to kick butt, Jamie Lynn–solid, Mike Ranquet–fakie skate style, Nate Cole–can jib it, Didi and Jerome from Chamonix–descents.

Shawn Farmer

Born?

A long, long time ago in Jefferson City, Missouri.

Started riding?

Breckenridge, Colorado, 1985/86. Vague memories of backhill woodies from Missouri high school days.

First Board?

It’s been a long time, but I think it was a 150 cm, triple-fin foam-core, beveled, swallowtail, Burton Performer Elite–with metal edges and lowbacks.

How did you get into snowboarding?

After high school, and a college attempt, I moved to Colorado to go skiing for a winter. I saw the Burton vid One Track Mind, and knew what had to be done. My friend Joey Ford and I drove five hours to Boulder, Colorado and bought the only two snowboards Wave Rave had at the time. We spent our whole week’s paychecks on those things and they weren’t even allowed at the resorts.

Describe your first day riding?

We hiked up this switchback road right in Breck and got about ten turns in. It was kind of hard to turn, but they still went way better than any skis I’d been on. When I squiggled my first series of linked S turns I was so stoked, I started having dreams about snowboarding.

What’s your first memory of Terje?

I think it was like ’87 or ’88 at Breck. This little kid was blazing down the pipe and just getting sick altitude on every hit. He was going overhead and getting more hits per run than anyone. No one could understand where he was generating that momentum. There was talk of his board being faster and stuff like that, but you could see it was just easier for him. Right then I understood the meaning of the word fluid–so I went to the bar.

What’s one thing you’ve accomplished, or will accomplish, during your snowboarding career?

I hope that I’ve been a positive influence overall. I hope I’ve inspired some kids and adults to go for something other than the status quo. I’d like to win King Of The Hill. I’d like to win some boardercrosses. I’d like to get another movie segment. I wanna have a heli-camp in Alaska or somewhere. I wanna put out some music. I could go on for days. I’m not sure what’s realistic anymore, but I’d like to throw down some raps. I need to create something. If I don’t die of old age first, I’m gonna do something again some day.

What would you call your best moment in snowboarding?

I guess the first King Of The Hill event, in Valdez was one of the best times. It was just new and wild, and I’d never ridden mountains like that before. We were free to do whatever–and we did.

What do you respect about other riders?

I like people who can have a good time with it. If you’re competitive, that’s cool, but if you can take runs with people of lesser ability and contribute to their enjoyment of the sport by whatever means, I think that makes you admirable. Life and snowboarding can be taken seriously, but there needs to be a balance.

What makes someone a good, or the best, snowboarder?

It’s the ability to do it all, and you gotta have heart and you gotta have sack.

Why do you think you’re on this list?

Honestly, I’m flattered, stoked and amazed to be on Terje’s list. I tried to push the limits for a lot of years. I know what kind of stuff I’m good at, and I just tried to go that route. I love big mountains and new terrain. I’m not too good at freestyle stuff, but I love to watch the dudes who are.

How would you like future snowboarders to remember you?

I guess a man who was a pioneer in the sport, had a lot of fun, and pushed the envelope of the time. Straight lines, big cliffs, big hits, high speed, and big boards.

One piece of advice for up-and-coming riders?

Just have a good time. Try to appreciate everything. Realize how lucky you are. Be humble. All the stuff I had a hard time doing sometimes.

What does it mean to you to have a place in the history of snowboarding–to have been a part of it all?

I’m glad to have been part of something so special. It isn’t often that a person has the opportunity to be in at the beginning of a revolution, especially one so cool. The early days can never be duplicated. Performer Elite–with metal edges and lowbacks.

How did you get into snowboarding?

After high school, and a college attempt, I moved to Colorado to go skiing for a winter. I saw the Burton vid One Track Mind, and knew what had to be done. My friend Joey Ford and I drove five hours to Boulder, Colorado and bought the only two snowboards Wave Rave had at the time. We spent our whole week’s paychecks on those things and they weren’t even allowed at the resorts.

Describe your first day riding?

We hiked up this switchback road right in Breck and got about ten turns in. It was kind of hard to turn, but they still went way better than any skis I’d been on. When I squiggled my first series of linked S turns I was so stoked, I started having dreams about snowboarding.

What’s your first memory of Terje?

I think it was like ’87 or ’88 at Breck. This little kid was blazing down the pipe and just getting sick altitude on every hit. He was going overhead and getting more hits per run than anyone. No one could understand where he was generating that momentum. There was talk of his board being faster and stuff like that, but you could see it was just easier for him. Right then I understood the meaning of the word fluid–so I went to the bar.

What’s one thing you’ve accomplished, or will accomplish, during your snowboarding career?

I hope that I’ve been a positive influence overall. I hope I’ve inspired some kids and adults to go for something other than the status quo. I’d like to win King Of The Hill. I’d like to win some boardercrosses. I’d like to get another movie segment. I wanna have a heli-camp in Alaska or somewhere. I wanna put out some music. I could go on for days. I’m not sure what’s realistic anymore, but I’d like to throw down some raps. I need to create something. If I don’t die of old age first, I’m gonna do something again some day.

What would you call your best moment in snowboarding?

I guess the first King Of The Hill event, in Valdez was one of the best times. It was just new and wild, and I’d never ridden mountains like that before. We were free to do whatever–and we did.

What do you respect about other riders?

I like people who can have a good time with it. If you’re competitive, that’s cool, but if you can take runs with people of lesser ability and contribute to their enjoyment of the sport by whatever means, I think that makes you admirable. Life and snowboarding can be taken seriously, but there needs to be a balance.

What makes someone a good, or the best, snowboarder?

It’s the ability to do it all, and you gotta have heart and you gotta have sack.

Why do you think you’re on this list?

Honestly, I’m flattered, stoked and amazed to be on Terje’s list. I tried to push the limits for a lot of years. I know what kind of stuff I’m good at, and I just tried to go that route. I love big mountains and new terrain. I’m not too good at freestyle stuff, but I love to watch the dudes who are.

How would you like future snowboarders to remember you?

I guess a man who was a pioneer in the sport, had a lot of fun, and pushed the envelope of the time. Straight lines, big cliffs, big hits, high speed, and big boards.

One piece of advice for up-and-coming riders?

Just have a good time. Try to appreciate everything. Realize how lucky you are. Be humble. All the stuff I had a hard time doing sometimes.

What does it mean to you to have a place in the history of snowboarding–to have been a part of it all?

I’m glad to have been part of something so special. It isn’t often that a person has the opportunity to be in at the beginning of a revolution, especially one so cool. The early days can never be duplicated. I feel fortunate to have been there, and I hope that I can find that feeling again some day in life, though I know it’ll be tough.

What’s one misconception people have about you?

That I’m good at golf–just kidding. Some people probably think I’m an ass, or I don’t like freestyle, or I’m anti-this or anti-that. I like freestyle, I just feel it’s force-fed to us a lot, and I don’t buy into propaganda–at least I try not to–but we’re all victims and perpetrators to an extent.

Who would be on your list of the ten best riders ever?

I don’t need to say Terje on my list because we all know, but here it is … Terje–he is his own list.

Andy Hetzel, Kevin Jones, Nick Perata, Kenny Hill, Andy Brewer, Terry Kidwell, Tom Gilles, Morgan LaFonte, Mike Ranquet, Craig Kelly, and Shaun Palmer.

Craig Kelly

Born?

April 1, 1966 in Granite City, Illinois.

Started riding?

1981 at Mt. Baker, Washington.

First board?

A Burton Backhill.

How did you get into snowboarding?

My friend Jeff Fulton rode BMX with me and was pretty much a leader in the action-sports industry. He took me up for the first time.

What’s your first memory of Terje?

I met him on a promo tour in Norway–my distributor had told me about this young kid. While I was there we built a jump, and I had learned a stalefish 360 in a few hours, which was a pretty progressive trick at the time. Next thing, Terje figures out how to do it in something like twenty minutes–and before that day he hadn’t even learned how to do a 360. He just learns so much faster than anyone else.

What’s one thing you hope you to accomplish during your snowboarding career?

It’s actually something that I’ve already accomplished–snowboarding on a personal level. It went through stages where it was controlled by contests, media, hectic schedules, and everything else, to now, where I’ve brought it back within myself and into my own terms.

What would you call your best moment in snowboarding if you had to single one out?

I think a couple of momentous powder turns at Mt. Baker. It’s a feeling more than a memory–a better feeling than I’ve ever had before or since.

How would your life be different if you hadn’t gotten into snowboarding?

That’s a good question. I was going to school for chemical engineering, so I probably would’ve gone to work for an ecological cause. I also had ambitions to study medicine, but who knows?

What do you respect about other riders?

I really like seeing riders who can carve turns and also pull big tricks and big moves.

What makes someone the best snowboarder?

I don’t think I could put myself in a position to be the judge. But the same things as above, I guess–people who can do everything.

Why do you think you’re on this list?

I’m on this list because I’m the only person Terje never beat laughs! I quit competing just in time.

How would you like future snowboarders to remember you?

My realization that it’s the experience that counts rather than perceived happiness.

One piece of advice for up-and-coming riders?

Like I tell my little brother, just concentrate on the “feeling.”

What does it mean to you to have a place in the history of snowboarding–to have been a part of it all?

I have a different perspective on things. It’s like being somewhere when something monumental happens. It’s nice to have been a part of a landmark in time, and I’m incredibly grateful to have been able to experience snowboarding when it was undefined. It means more to me than any accomplishment or any impact I may have had on the sport.

What’s the biggest misconception you think people have about you?

Probably that I should be able to do McTwists in the pipe, or whatever. I’m pretty mellow and more into the whole experience.

Who would be on your list of the ten best riders ever?

Jeff Fulton, Dan Donnely, Tex Devenport, Carter Turk, Mike Ranquet, Terry Kidwell, Tom Sims, Jake Burton, Tom Burt, and Terje.

Bjorn Leines

Born?

March 27, 1977 in Minnesota.

Started riding?

Big Lake, Minnesota. I’m not sure when, though, maybe ’89 or ’90.

First board?

A Burton Cruise 135.

Describe your first day riding?

It was on the 50-foot hill at my house. I had ski poles in my hand, and just went straight.

What’s one thing you hope to accomplish during your snowboarding career?

Longevity. I hope to have a long career and keep snowboarding.

What would you call your best moment in snowboarding if you had to single one out?

Riding a pow day in Utah with my brothers and friends when I was about fiffteen.

How wo