By Jeremy Jones and Roberta Rodger

I never thought it possible to explain J.P.’s snowboarding. Sure, I’m able to see the look of complete amazement on people’s faces after seeing the kid ride, but putting it in words seems hopeless. One day Peter Line and I were talking, and he said to me “J.P. could be the best in the world.” I was amazed-he put his riding in words. It’s as simple as that. J.P. stands alone with his snowboarding-one day soon he’s going to be untouchable.

About eight years ago while walking home from my ex-girlfriend’s house, I saw this kid on a skateboard with long blond hair and a super chiseled chin busting out nosepicks to Indy on my curb. The nerve of the kid!

“What’s up, dude? You’re not from around here, are you?” I said.

“Nope, I just moved down here from SLC. I live over there in that pink house.” And he pointed.

“My name is Jeremy, dude.”

“My name is John Paul, but everybody calls me J.P.”

“Nice to meet you, bro. What do you say you teach me those nosepicks?”

“Sure.”

From that day on, our relationship progressed into lifelong buddies. I’ve been lucky enough to witness J.P.’s snowboarding from day one. He has the ability to make his snowboard work exactly the way he wants. J.P. is more consistent than any other rider I’ve ever seen. I still catch myself trying to figure out what trick he just did. Even if it’s a plain old 360 Indy-he makes it look so amazingly good. The bottom line is that J.P. is simply unbelievable in all aspects! I don’t know what else to say, dude. Peace.

-Jeremy Jones

The following interview was conducted by Roberta Rodger.

Were you born and raised in Farmington, Utah?

No, I was born in Salt Lake, and I lived there until the summer before ninth grade when I moved to Farmington-that’s where I pretty much grew up. That’s where I met all my coolest friends, who I still have now.

What was it like growing up there?

It was so much cooler than Salt Lake-there really were no kids where I lived in Salt Lake City, so I didn’t have a lot of friends. I didn’t think I would like Farmington, but the kids I met I was really stoked on. They introduced me to snowboarding. Who knows, I might never have started snowboarding had I not moved there.

Before you got involved with snowboarding, were you into any other sports?

When I was in junior high I wrestled for one year, but I wasn’t any good. I was always on Little League teams. I was stoked on baseball, and made the team at Farmington, but then I was over it. I skated all the time.

Did you ski?

I skied. I grew up skiing tons. I was a four year old when I first started. I still remember some Fridays when I got out of school early my dad would come and pick me up, but that just got played out.

So your parents skied?

Yeah, my dad-I always thought he was all sick-he was good. And my mom and sister skied. We’d always go on the family ski trip, but by the time I started snowboarding, my family never really went anymore. I gave my sister a snowboard like three years ago and she still has never even ridden it. And now she’s asking for gloves and boots and stuff-like she’s ever going to use them! Laughs.

Back then did you ever think that things would turn out like they have?

Not really. When I first started, I never thought about getting sponsored. Then when I figured out snowboarding, I thought about sponsorship. It’s weird, because even now I can’t believe what’s happening. It’s always changing. Every day something new is happening. It’s always getting better.

You’re not Mormon, but do you think that growing up in Utah around that sort of influence had an effect on you and your friends?

Yeah, I’m sure it did, because all my friends were Mormon. I was kinda getting to be a bad kid at one time, and then I started getting cool, I guess. Laughing This is a hard question. I don’t swear probably because all my friends don’t. After I got over ing a bad kid, I got so into being a rad kid. Me and my friends would snowboard in the backyard in high school, and some other friends would be like, “Dude, let’s go out and party tonight.”

And we’d be like, “Dude, whatever, we’re snowboarding tonight.”

And they’d say, “What? What are you talking about?”

We’d be all, “Yeah, dude. We’re hitting the jump in the backyard Friday night … Saturday night.” That’s what we were all about-not even into partying. I’m still like that now-when I go on trips and after snowboarding, everyone’s all, “Let’s go to the bar!” I’m so much more into hanging out at home, relaxing and getting ready for the next day of snowboarding instead of just going out and killing myself. Laughs.

Snowboarders are known for partying, do people try to pressure you to drink?

Some people try to pressure me, because they feel weird, or try to buy me a drink ’cause I’m the kid who’s not drinking. I understand how people feel like that, so I never feel the pressure.

I’ll just hang out at the bar for awhile, and then go play pool or go home. It’s not like I’m all against it-I just can’t get into it. I don’t want to be the party pooper. Like if everyone wants to go out and have fun, I’m totally into that.

What do you think of contests? Do you get stoked?

I get pretty stoked on them. You get a little extra pumped up because you want to do good, and everyone’s there, and maybe there’s money. I get a little nervous, too. After I drop in, it doesn’t affect me, but for sure I get nervous. Plus it’s cool because it’s usually a new thing to ride, maybe a new jump.

You and your friends have had a major influence on bringing jibbing back, what does it feel like to have that kind of impact on the sport?

It feels cool. I always did jibs and handrails because they were fun. They add variety.Me and Jeremy grew up on it jibbing, and one day we’re like, “We gotta bring it back.” I think it deserves just as much respect as any other kind of snowboarding because of the consequences that come with it. Plus you can get so much more variety there than just a kicker. There’s just so much more to do with it, so much more to learn.

A lot of people say there’s nothing like a good pow turn in snowboarding, is that how you think?

I think there’re things for sure as good as a good powder turn-simple things. I get just as stoked on a good, solid landing as a good pow turn, and I can have just as much fun doing pow turns as doing handrails. I’m not afraid to go ride handrails on a pow day because they both get me just as stoked. It just depends on what I’m feeling like that day.

Before you became a professional snowboarder, who did you look up to?

The first guy I remember getting stoked on was Noah Salasnek because he had the best style in Critical Condition, and then Roan Rogers. He was another guy who stood out in the video he was in-way more technical, way more style than anyone else.

After that, I got way stoked on Peter Line. Once me and my friend Mitch made this thing called “The Line Shrine.” We put it in our room. It was this big piece of sheet metal with pictures and posters of Peter on it. Whenever new pictures came out, we put ‘em on the shrine. Sequences, too. Oh, and we put Christmas lights on it-the dumbest stuff, but it was cool. I’m still stoked on it.

Now that you’re on the Forum Team with him, are you still as stoked on Peter now?

Yes, for sure. There’re two posters of him on my wall still today.

The following interview was conducted by Jeremy Jones.

What do you do in the summer other than play Mortal Kombat?

I usually try to skate a whole bunch, but it’s always so hot. I just go skate and hang out with my friends. I’m pretty stoked on filming friends skateboarding.

Filming runs?

Like being the cameraman-filming my friends doing stuff because they’re good. It’s super cool.

Why don’t you ever let your friends film you skating?

Laughs ‘Cause I never get anything.

I’ve seen you get stuff, and you don’t let other people film it.

I just get weird. I don’t know, it’s kinda like a breather, I guess-like I’m not getting filmed anymore-now I’m the cameraman.

So it’s sort of like your break from snowboarding-get on the other side of things?

Yeah, I guess so. It’s like, I worry about getting a section all year in snowboarding. I don’t want to stress too hard trying to film a skate part. If I feel like I got something that day, then that’s cool.

What else do you like to do?

I just started getting into riding BMX bikes … you got me into it.

Is it fun for you?

Yeah, it’s cool. I thought I would suck at it … actually I do suck at it, but I’m better than I thought I’d be. It’s cool because it’s a new thing-I’ll start to get burned out on skating eventually. It’s super cool, too, because you get to go off big stuff, hang out, and just build and dig stuff-that’s cool.

Going swimming is rad.

What’s your favorite kind of swimming?

To go to these high-diving platformsand just jump off them and try to get sick.

Do you try to do sick moves or is it mostly trying to style out the moves you already know?

Yeah, I just try to style out stuff I know-it’s kinda scary, so it’s hard to work in new stuff off that.

Are you scared in the summer of getting hurt and ruining your season-do you think about that?

No, I never think about that. If I ever think about that, it’s when I’m traveling with snowboarding. I never think like, “Oh, I might take myself out for the year.” So I’m not scared to go skateboard. I don’t look at it like, “Oh my god, be careful-I’m an athlete who’s afraid to get hurt.”

What was it that got you into snowboarding anyway?

Skating. Totally.

Tell me about what it’s like to come up with one of the best sections in a video and have to watch yourself on a huge screen in front of a bunch of people at the premiere.

The premiere is the most hairball thing that you can go to-there’s so much stress to see how people react to your part. When my part came on last year Simple Pleasures, I just got so low in my seat. I swear-I just tweaked. I was so scared. I’m stoked that I got a good part, ’cause I’d probably be so pissed if I didn’t. I’m pretty determined, I guess, to get good stuff-I just don’t want weak stuff coming out of me.

Did you feel like you tried really super hard to get that part, or did it just come together? Did you punish yourself to get it?

No, it came together. I never felt like I was working hard, just because the whole time I was filming I had fun. If I’m having fun, it’s never like I was on the job to get this section. But if at the end of the year it hadn’t been good, I probably would have been on that stuff, and been like, “I gotta work hard next year.”

That’s rad. Where do you want to take your riding with filming? What’s your next level?

Same as everyone, I guess. Get a better part. Keep coming out with better parts. If your section wasn’t better than your last part, it seems like you kinda get harshed. I don’t know, it seems like video parts in general got stale for like a second-everyone was backside threein’. I just don’t ever want a backside threein’ part. I always want to come out with something new. You helped me out with that when we did that goal post …

That was a good day.

So good. Stuff like that I get stoked on. No matter what it is- even if it’s just a railslide, but it’s on top of a goalpost, it’s something no one has ever seen, and that makes it super sick.

Your parents are super supportive of you, have they always been about snowboarding?

I think I was this bad rebel kid in school, and I think my mom was getting over me, and one day she was like, “What are you going to do with your life?”

I was all “I’m gonna get sponsorelet your friends film you skating?

Laughs ‘Cause I never get anything.

I’ve seen you get stuff, and you don’t let other people film it.

I just get weird. I don’t know, it’s kinda like a breather, I guess-like I’m not getting filmed anymore-now I’m the cameraman.

So it’s sort of like your break from snowboarding-get on the other side of things?

Yeah, I guess so. It’s like, I worry about getting a section all year in snowboarding. I don’t want to stress too hard trying to film a skate part. If I feel like I got something that day, then that’s cool.

What else do you like to do?

I just started getting into riding BMX bikes … you got me into it.

Is it fun for you?

Yeah, it’s cool. I thought I would suck at it … actually I do suck at it, but I’m better than I thought I’d be. It’s cool because it’s a new thing-I’ll start to get burned out on skating eventually. It’s super cool, too, because you get to go off big stuff, hang out, and just build and dig stuff-that’s cool.

Going swimming is rad.

What’s your favorite kind of swimming?

To go to these high-diving platformsand just jump off them and try to get sick.

Do you try to do sick moves or is it mostly trying to style out the moves you already know?

Yeah, I just try to style out stuff I know-it’s kinda scary, so it’s hard to work in new stuff off that.

Are you scared in the summer of getting hurt and ruining your season-do you think about that?

No, I never think about that. If I ever think about that, it’s when I’m traveling with snowboarding. I never think like, “Oh, I might take myself out for the year.” So I’m not scared to go skateboard. I don’t look at it like, “Oh my god, be careful-I’m an athlete who’s afraid to get hurt.”

What was it that got you into snowboarding anyway?

Skating. Totally.

Tell me about what it’s like to come up with one of the best sections in a video and have to watch yourself on a huge screen in front of a bunch of people at the premiere.

The premiere is the most hairball thing that you can go to-there’s so much stress to see how people react to your part. When my part came on last year Simple Pleasures, I just got so low in my seat. I swear-I just tweaked. I was so scared. I’m stoked that I got a good part, ’cause I’d probably be so pissed if I didn’t. I’m pretty determined, I guess, to get good stuff-I just don’t want weak stuff coming out of me.

Did you feel like you tried really super hard to get that part, or did it just come together? Did you punish yourself to get it?

No, it came together. I never felt like I was working hard, just because the whole time I was filming I had fun. If I’m having fun, it’s never like I was on the job to get this section. But if at the end of the year it hadn’t been good, I probably would have been on that stuff, and been like, “I gotta work hard next year.”

That’s rad. Where do you want to take your riding with filming? What’s your next level?

Same as everyone, I guess. Get a better part. Keep coming out with better parts. If your section wasn’t better than your last part, it seems like you kinda get harshed. I don’t know, it seems like video parts in general got stale for like a second-everyone was backside threein’. I just don’t ever want a backside threein’ part. I always want to come out with something new. You helped me out with that when we did that goal post …

That was a good day.

So good. Stuff like that I get stoked on. No matter what it is- even if it’s just a railslide, but it’s on top of a goalpost, it’s something no one has ever seen, and that makes it super sick.

Your parents are super supportive of you, have they always been about snowboarding?

I think I was this bad rebel kid in school, and I think my mom was getting over me, and one day she was like, “What are you going to do with your life?”

I was all “I’m gonna get sponsored, and be a pro snowboarder.” And she said, “All right, that’s cool.” But in her head-she told me this later on-she thought, “Whatever, you can’t make a living snowboarding.” And now she’s like, “I wish I was doing what I liked to do back then.”

That’s pretty sick. Is she pretty much your biggest fan?

Yeah, she totally is. She always embarrasses me. She’ll quickly tell someone she just met all about my snowboarding.

At least you know someone’s always got your back.

Yeah, it’s cool.

Would you like to thank anyone who helped you along the way?

The only reason I ever wanted an interview was so I could thank everyone who ever helped me out in any way. I swear my whole interview could be a thank-you list. Anyway, here it is: First of all, my family and best friends, Mom and Dad, my sister Whitney. Thank you all for the support. To Jeremy Jones, for always having my back and always pushing me. To the F.C. (Mitch, Marc, Brandon, Chris), bros for life. To Jason Murphy, Shane Justice, Mikey LeBlanc, Steve Ruff, and the Forum team. To everyone who ever shot a photo or filmed me-Mike McEntire, Ross Steffey, Kurt Heine, Whitey, Rob Mathis, J.C. Brady, and Cintia Schutt. To everyone at Forum Snowboards-Raul Reiss, Veronica, Travis, Niko, Carl, Jason, and Todd; Special Blend Outerwear. All my team managers-Chad DiNenna at Nixon, Gus Buckner at Oakley, Markus Paulsen at DC, Scott at Three Bald Guys; Josh, George, and Benny at Milo. To Gunny at Snow Summit, Ken and Bruce at Camp of Champions, Tim Ostler, Michael Lucas, Will Gilmore, the original Rev team, and Peter Line. Special thanks to Roberta Rodger for being my girlfriend and my best friend. I love you all-thank you. If I forgot anyone, I suck.

Pull Quotes:

Stuff like that I get stoked on. No matter what it is-even if it’s just a railslide, but it’s on top of a goalpost, it’s something no one has ever seen, and that makes it super sick.

I don’t know, it seems like video parts in general got stale for like a second-everyone was backside threein’. I just don’t ever want a backside threein’ part.sored, and be a pro snowboarder.” And she said, “All right, that’s cool.” But in her head-she told me this later on-she thought, “Whatever, you can’t make a living snowboarding.” And now she’s like, “I wish I was doing what I liked to do back then.”

That’s pretty sick. Is she pretty much your biggest fan?

Yeah, she totally is. She always embarrasses me. She’ll quickly tell someone she just met all about my snowboarding.

At least you know someone’s always got your back.

Yeah, it’s cool.

Would you like to thank anyone who helped you along the way?

The only reason I ever wanted an interview was so I could thank everyone who ever helped me out in any way. I swear my whole interview could be a thank-you list. Anyway, here it is: First of all, my family and best friends, Mom and Dad, my sister Whitney. Thank you all for the support. To Jeremy Jones, for always having my back and always pushing me. To the F.C. (Mitch, Marc, Brandon, Chris), bros for life. To Jason Murphy, Shane Justice, Mikey LeBlanc, Steve Ruff, and the Forum team. To everyone who ever shot a photo or filmed me-Mike McEntire, Ross Steffey, Kurt Heine, Whitey, Rob Mathis, J.C. Brady, and Cintia Schutt. To everyone at Forum Snowboards-Raul Reiss, Veronica, Travis, Niko, Carl, Jason, and Todd; Special Blend Outerwear. All my team managers-Chad DiNenna at Nixon, Gus Buckner at Oakley, Markus Paulsen at DC, Scott at Three Bald Guys; Josh, George, and Benny at Milo. To Gunny at Snow Summit, Ken and Bruce at Camp of Champions, Tim Ostler, Michael Lucas, Will Gilmore, the original Rev team, and Peter Line. Special thanks to Roberta Rodger for being my girlfriend and my best friend. I love you all-thank you. If I forgot anyone, I suck.

Pull Quotes:

Stuff like that I get stoked on. No matter what it is-even if it’s just a railslide, but it’s on top of a goalposst, it’s something no one has ever seen, and that makes it super sick.

I don’t know, it seems like video parts in general got stale for like a second-everyone was backside threein’. I just don’t ever want a backside threein’ part.