It’s noon on Wednesday, and Jamie Lynn is on the tee of a Mexican golf course silently lining up his club with the ball.

He speaks of his interests passionately-the ocean, the mountains, his art, motorcycles, as well as golf-which like the many things he describes in his life, happened to him. Alone at a Hawaiian resort with time on his hands and a green underfoot, golf found him, and Jamie has accepted yet another life challenge by accident. It’s this humble view of existence that allows him to experience life with eyes wide open-appreciative and learning throughout his path.

Jamie brings his club back with his shoulders, pivoting his weight from his front to his back foot, and never takes his eyes off the ball. He lets it fly, and the ball speeds off into the hard light of the afternoon.

Golf is a game of the constant self-challenge-a perfect game for Jamie, whose semi-Socratic philosophy of the unexamined life not being worth living is easily read in his pensive and sometimes distant concentration. This self-reflection is the key to Jamie’s proficiency in all arenas of his life, just as much as the strong will to succeed that drives him.

The ball is still soaring as his jaw drops-he never thought it would travel that far. The distance is almost deceptive, and it never occurs to either of us to yell “fore” to the group of unsuspecting hackers 270 yards ahead before it strikes their cart, echoes and terrifies the meatheads inside.

Jamie looks away with an embarassed smile, and turns back with disbelief. It was a mistake-a miscalculation. After all, Jamie Lynn is human-something people tend to forget, no doubt due to the legendary mystique that trancends him in the snowboard world.

Man, that was a long, beautiful ball …

What has snowboarding become in your eyes?

Snowboarding has always been about enjoying yourself up in the mountains, whether it be by yourself or with your friends. On the career side of snowboarding, it’s come full circle. It started out because I really love to do it, and then what was once my escape from school, teachers, and parents was then my job. It kind of tied me down to my responsibilities-just weight on my shoulders I had to carry. Snowboarding now is getting back to that root where I was just going out and having fun-that’s what really means the most to me.

As snowboarding changed into a job-could you always keep it separate?

I try to always keep it separate, regardless of the pressure and the responsibilities, but I’m fortunate enough to have sponsors supporting me and open enough to let me kind of play out whatever direction I want to take it, and that’s really been the key element to keeping it fun for me.

What in snowboarding has changed in the last five years? I really see a change in the media and how the world perceives it snowboarding. It used to be a tight group of friends going out and doing this off-the-wall new sport called snowboarding, and now because of a lot of the popularity through the Olympics, ESPN, and the X-Games, you have people promoting it who are not driven because they love the sport-it’s because they know it’s a viable means to make money.

When I got into snowboarding I didn’t think I was gonna make any money or go anywhere with it-it was just something that really felt good when I was on that board. Now you see people starting it for all the wrong reasons-a lot of it money-driven. That saddens me: to see that aspect being played out in the sport of snowboarding-when I see kids starting up snowboarding these days, and they’re just doing it because they want to be sponsored. They want to make money and this notoriety that comes with being a top professional. Regardless of what sport, when you start with those motives in mind, it’s not the purest way to get into something.

So what would you tell a kid out on the hill now trying to make it as a sponsored snowboarder?

As long you have the true desire inside. That’s the most important thing-the desire to better your ability. Go out there and do it, and everything else will fall into place. You don’t have to talk yourself up, you just have to let the riding do the talking.

Does that desire within you carry over into other things?

I think it plays a really critical role into anything I get into, whether it’s a new painting or a piece of art, playing golf, or riding motorcycles-I’m internally driven by whatever is inside of me to be the best. It’s more of a competition within myself than with anybody else, and that’s what makes me strive to be better.

Do you think of yourself as competitive?

I’ve never thought of myself as a competitive person before. I’d always categorize competitiveness into a team-sport-oriented type of element where you are competing against somebody else. But now that I’ve had a chance to experience that level of competitiveness-in a competition that’s really heavy-I’m trying to prove to myself that I can do the best jump that I can do, and let that effort fall into place in the field of the other competitors. I was never putting myself against somebody else, because a lot of times that’s my friend I just had a really good powder day with the week before. It really helps me to focus within myself to be the best that I can be.

Do you ever set too high a standard for yourself? Do you ever come up short?

No, I don’t think there’s too high a standard. I think it’s good to set high goals for yourself, because you gotta push the level of your own ability. If it’s something I set a really high mark for myself in and I didn’t reach that goal, then I just learn from my mistake and try to do better the next time. It’s really all you can do. I never took it really too harsh on myself if I didn’t make that mark-it only made me want to reach that mark even more, and try to strive to hit that high standard. And a lot of times I came out going “Man, I never thought I’d be doing this,” or “I never thought I’d be able to do that.”

Alaska is a good example. I never thought in my wildest dreams that I’d be going up and snowboarding down such steep hairball stuff, where I thought at any moment, if I made a mistake, it could mean life or death.

Did you walk away from Alaska with more confidence?

A lot more confidence and respect for the people who are going up there every year. I’d always had a lot of respect for people like Dave Hatchett and Tom Burt ’cause I used to watch the videos and go, “Man, that looks crazy.” But you never get the true perspective until you’re up there doing it yourself. There’s no photograph or camera angle that ever gave any of that justice. People like Noah Salasnek, who toyed with that steepness and some of the runs that he chose on the trip that we were on, were mind-blowing. He really took something that was crazy and took it to another level.

There’s a heightened energy that people come back from Alaska talking about. How did it affect you?

The mountains up there are so big and the runs are long and steep. You can practice your technique of doing a powder turn and I never thought I’d be doing enough powder turns back to back to where you really start feeling how your weight would sink your edge into the powder. It’s like having a perfect wave and being able to hit that lip a million times down the line and having that wave not end for a mile or two. You have 5,000 vertical feet of untouched powder to do S turns down-it’s an incredible sensation.

It really made me open my eyes to what I loved about snowboarding. It isn’t necessarily going off some icy jump in the middle of the city for some kicker contest, it was really the sensation of floating through powder and setting your edge in just two feet of fresh and watching the fan shoot up overhead. It also humbled me to think that there is some element out there that is very much larger than you that could squash you like a bug at any second. It really made me appreciate life in general for that reason.

What I’m hearing is that you are still learning about snowboarding. Are there still experiences that are new for you?

I think snowboarding is unique in the fact that you can go up at night to your local hill when it’s raining and still really learn about snowboarding. It’s something that’s ever-evolving. People are taking it to different levels and different places, and for that reason it never really gets old for me. I might need to take a break here and there, but it’s something that will never leave me. I always have that same feeling and sensation when I strap onto that snowboard.

If you had to give a definition, what would define a good snowboarder?

Someone who has the ability to, regardless of the situation, express their own style. And the ability to excel in different environments at the top level-whether it be powder or halfpipe, or some 30- or 40-foot tabletop in a snowboard park.

Of course, someone like Terje is an obvious example. You put him in any kind of situation and he’ll set the highest standard. He really adapts to the situation and performs at the highest level. That style of snowboarder is something that I think is the definition-someone who is versatile and can excel in all situations.

You mentioned Terje. What other snowboarders do you respect and admire? Which ones are pushing you?

The people that I ride with, that push me, aren’t always the world’s best. It could be the guys I grew up with; their style, their freewill-they don’t care what other people think. They’re just out there to have fun and to push the riding level with their friends. I think that is something that pushes me. When I see that kind of exuberance and fun in their riding styles, it makes me just want to get on my board-even if it’s jumping some two-foot jump over a crazy rail-you have fun, and it’s contagious.

Would you say you had a charmed life?

I definitely think that I have been really fortunate in the way that my life has played out. Being able to go straight from a skateboarding rocker kid, just trying to make it through high school, to starting this new sport that was young and fresh-I was fortunate enough to get the support from family and friends, I had a lot of teachers in my high school who helped me out a lot. The P.E. teacher would give me credit for going to the snowboard contests-that was instrumental in helping me get through high school. Support of shops like Northwest Snowboards and the Cummins family-they would drive us to contests on the weekends regardless if it was ten hours away in Idaho.

It’s been a blessing to be able to travel and do the things I have gotten to do on a snowboard. If I stopped right now, I’d have a full life. I’ve seen a lot and done a lot. And I owe a majority of that to snowboarding-I’ve really been blessed to have that kind of opportunity.

Any regrets along the way?

No. I try to never have any regrets.

There’s nothing you would like to do over?
Nope. I try to live every day like it’s my last. I’ve had too many life experiences-friends who have been taken from me or taken from this life at too young an age, where I’ve really thought, “Hey, anything can happen, so you might as well live like every day is your last.”

What would you like to try that you haven’t?

Skydiving would be fun to try … and to surf ten-foot Pipeline, and jump 20 garbage cans on my BMX bike, and top-fuel drag racing.

But there’re a lot of things out there that one day or one hour I might look at that and go, “I’d like to try to move to Hawaii and live on the beach selling T-shirts to tourists.” It’s something like that I always hit on for a second, even if it’s just a notion and far on the other side of the spectrum from what I’m used to doing in my day-to-day existence. But that’s what intrigues me to want to tryou that could squash you like a bug at any second. It really made me appreciate life in general for that reason.

What I’m hearing is that you are still learning about snowboarding. Are there still experiences that are new for you?

I think snowboarding is unique in the fact that you can go up at night to your local hill when it’s raining and still really learn about snowboarding. It’s something that’s ever-evolving. People are taking it to different levels and different places, and for that reason it never really gets old for me. I might need to take a break here and there, but it’s something that will never leave me. I always have that same feeling and sensation when I strap onto that snowboard.

If you had to give a definition, what would define a good snowboarder?

Someone who has the ability to, regardless of the situation, express their own style. And the ability to excel in different environments at the top level-whether it be powder or halfpipe, or some 30- or 40-foot tabletop in a snowboard park.

Of course, someone like Terje is an obvious example. You put him in any kind of situation and he’ll set the highest standard. He really adapts to the situation and performs at the highest level. That style of snowboarder is something that I think is the definition-someone who is versatile and can excel in all situations.

You mentioned Terje. What other snowboarders do you respect and admire? Which ones are pushing you?

The people that I ride with, that push me, aren’t always the world’s best. It could be the guys I grew up with; their style, their freewill-they don’t care what other people think. They’re just out there to have fun and to push the riding level with their friends. I think that is something that pushes me. When I see that kind of exuberance and fun in their riding styles, it makes me just want to get on my board-even if it’s jumping some two-foot jump over a crazy rail-you have fun, and it’s contagious.

Would you say you had a charmed life?

I definitely think that I have been really fortunate in the way that my life has played out. Being able to go straight from a skateboarding rocker kid, just trying to make it through high school, to starting this new sport that was young and fresh-I was fortunate enough to get the support from family and friends, I had a lot of teachers in my high school who helped me out a lot. The P.E. teacher would give me credit for going to the snowboard contests-that was instrumental in helping me get through high school. Support of shops like Northwest Snowboards and the Cummins family-they would drive us to contests on the weekends regardless if it was ten hours away in Idaho.

It’s been a blessing to be able to travel and do the things I have gotten to do on a snowboard. If I stopped right now, I’d have a full life. I’ve seen a lot and done a lot. And I owe a majority of that to snowboarding-I’ve really been blessed to have that kind of opportunity.

Any regrets along the way?

No. I try to never have any regrets.

There’s nothing you would like to do over?
Nope. I try to live every day like it’s my last. I’ve had too many life experiences-friends who have been taken from me or taken from this life at too young an age, where I’ve really thought, “Hey, anything can happen, so you might as well live like every day is your last.”

What would you like to try that you haven’t?

Skydiving would be fun to try … and to surf ten-foot Pipeline, and jump 20 garbage cans on my BMX bike, and top-fuel drag racing.

But there’re a lot of things out there that one day or one hour I might look at that and go, “I’d like to try to move to Hawaii and live on the beach selling T-shirts to tourists.” It’s something like that I always hit on for a second, even if it’s just a notion and far on the other side of the spectrum from what I’m used to doing in my day-to-day existence. But that’s what intrigues me to want to try it.

So you’re constantly challenging yourself to see how far your limits lie?

Yeah, just to test life in general. To test your own existence to against what’s out there, you know?

I went down to Key West, Florida to see a good friend of mine, Aaron Cain. I’d never been to the Southeast, and he wanted me to try scuba diving, so I found myself in a hot sweaty classroom in the back of some dive shop for four days straight getting certified. And without that opportunity and following it through from beginning to end, where I got the certification and went out there and did the dives, I never would have been opened up to this underwater world that is incredible.

I’ve always wanted to drive across country, but I never had the opportunity, nor the time to do it. And down in Florida, I woke up one morning and decided it would be really cool to drive a motorcycle across the country-it was actually Temple who inspired me. So I went into the bike shop and bought an 1100cc motorcycle-I’d never been on a bike bigger than my 250 motocross bike. My girlfriend flew down, and we ended up driving across country-all the way from Florida to Laguna Beach, California. Until you have the confidence inside of yourself to say that you can do it, you’ll never know. And if I would’ve bought the bike and got too scared to go through with it, it would be a regret I would live with for the rest of my life.

How’d it go?

It ended up going really smooth. We drove across country, it took us ten days, I saw parts of the South I’ve never seen-New Orleans, Texas, and the Four Corners region. It was beautiful. It was the opportunity of a lifetime. That’s how I try to live my life-If it sounds good to do it one morning, then do it. There’s no one holding you back, there’s no excuse not to.

Favorite memory?

Probably my most vivid memory is going down to the river with my parents. I was so small-my dad built this little pool on the side of the river out of big river rocks to contain his kids in and keep us out of the strong current of the river so we didn’t float away. I have really vivid memories of the water and how warm it was in the summer, in the sun, and the smell of the green trees in Washington. Being on the river in the summertime is a unique experience.

Is finding time with your family important?

Yeah, spending time with my family has always been pretty high up on my life priorities. Especially after traveling pretty much nonstop for six or seven years. It’s really made me realize how nice it is to have the security of a family. Recently I’ve had the opportunity to go up to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington with my dad, who really likes to fish. We spent all day from sunup to sundown on the side of the river just catching 25- 30-pound salmon by ourselves. We don’t say too much to each other all day long, but to share an experience like that being quiet and content on the side of the river is pretty special to me.

And what makes you happy?

Doing a Smith grind on Vert. But actually I’m happy just being able to roll out of bed each morning and have two feet to stand on. You know a lot people take that for granted, there’re a lot people out there who don’t have that simple thing. It makes me pretty happy inside to walk out my front door and have a view of Mount Rainier and watch the sun rise on the mountain. There’re a lot of things: being at home with my family, having a barbecue, sharing time with my friends, being able to travel and see friends around the world maybe I haven’t seen in a while-really good friends who when we do hook up, we really make the most of it.

You have got a certain respect or appreciation of life. Where did that come from? Traveling? Family? Friends? I don’t really know where-I don’t think it’s really one place that I can draw it from-but I think it’s an accumulation of different experiences throughout life that teach you lessonss. Some are good and some are bad, but both teach you just as much about yourself: thoughtful loving parents who instill certain qualities in you as a kid and as a person. Learning from other people, because I think we take for granted the people that we are around. No matter who it is, or where it is, we still can give something to them and learn something in return. I think there is a huge wealth of knowledge out there-just being in touch with it and opening yourself up, that’s important.

Any last words to our readers.

I don’t think you could ever say it too much: go out and enjoy life for yourself and really look inside to see what makes you happy. And when that doesn’t always work, grab a friend because there’s always strength in numbers. That helped me out a lot through life, being able to share experiences with my friends that, growing up, really gave me the strength and confidence I needed to do the things that I had inside of me.

Do you want to thank anyone?

The thank you list would go on forever. There’re a lot of people who have helped me through the years-and for that I am deeply grateful. That help and support means the world to me, ’cause without that I wouldn’t have the confidence to do a lot of the things that I have done in my life.

So you’re constantly challenging yourself to see how far your limits lie?

Yeah, just to test life in general. To test your own existence to against what’s out there, you know?

I went down to Key West, Florida to see a good friend of mine, Aaron Cain. I’d never been to the Southeast, and he wanted me to try scuba diving, so I found myself in a hot sweaty classroom in the back of some dive shop for four days straight getting certified. And without that opportunity and following it through from beginning to end, where I got the certification and went out there and did the dives, I never would have been opened up to this underwater world that is incredible.

I’ve always wanted to drive across country, but I never had the opportunity, nor the time to do it. And down in Florida, I woke up one morning and decided it would be really cool to drive a motorcycle across the country-it was actually Temple who inspired me. So I went into the bike shop and bought an 1100cc motorcycle-I’d never been on a bike bigger than my 250 motocross bike. My girlfriend flew down, and we ended up driving across country-all the way from Florida to Laguna Beach, California. Until you have the confidence inside of yourself to say that you can do it, you’ll never know. And if I would’ve bought the bike and got too scared to go through with it, it would be a regret I would live with for the rest of my life.

How’d it go?

It ended up going really smooth. We drove across country, it took us ten days, I saw parts of the South I’ve never seen-New Orleans, Texas, and the Four Corners region. It was beautiful. It was the opportunity of a lifetime. That’s how I try to live my life-If it sounds good to do it one morning, then do it. There’s no one holding you back, there’s no excuse not to.

Favorite memory?

Probably my most vivid memory is going down to the river with my parents. I was so small-my dad built this little pool on the side of the river out of big river rocks to contain his kids in and keep us out of the strong current of the river so we didn’t float away. I have really vivid memories of the water and how warm it was in the summer, in the sun, and the smell of the green trees in Washington. Being on the river in the summertime is a unique experience.

Is finding time with your family important?

Yeah, spending time with my family has always been pretty high up on my life priorities. Especially after traveling pretty much nonstop for six or seven years. It’s really made me realize how nice it is to have the security of a family. Recently I’ve had the opportunity to go up to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington with my dad, who really likes to fish. We spent all day from sunup to sundown on the side of the river just catching 25- 30-pound salmon by ourselves. We don’t say too much to each other all day long, but to share an experience like that being quiet and content on the side of the river is pretty special to me.

And what makes you happy?

Doing a Smith grind on Vert. But actually I’m happy just being able to roll out of bed each morning and have two feet to stand on. You know a lot people take that for granted, there’re a lot people out there who don’t have that simple thing. It makes me pretty happy inside to walk out my front door and have a view of Mount Rainier and watch the sun rise on the mountain. There’re a lot of things: being at home with my family, having a barbecue, sharing time with my friends, being able to travel and see friends around the world maybe I haven’t seen in a while-really good friends who when we do hook up, we really make the most of it.

You have got a certain respect or appreciation of life. Where did that come from? Traveling? Family? Friends? I don’t really know where-I don’t think it’s really one place that I can draw it from-but I think it’s an accumulation of different experiences throughout life that teach you lessons. Some are good and some are bad, but both teach you just as much about yourself: thoughtful loving parents who instill certain qualities in you as a kid and as a person. Learning from other people, because I think we take for granted the people that we are around. No matter who it is, or where it is, we still can give something to them and learn something in return. I think there is a huge wealth of knowledge out there-just being in touch with it and opening yourself up, that’s important.

Any last words to our readers.

I don’t think you could ever say it too much: go out and enjoy life for yourself and really look inside to see what makes you happy. And when that doesn’t always work, grab a friend because there’s always strength in numbers. That helped me out a lot through life, being able to share experiences with my friends that, growing up, really gave me the strength and confidence I needed to do the things that I had inside of me.

Do you want to thank anyone?

The thank you list would go on forever. There’re a lot of people who have helped me through the years-and for that I am deeply grateful. That help and support means the world to me, ’cause without that I wouldn’t have the confidence to do a lot of the things that I have done in my life lessons. Some are good and some are bad, but both teach you just as much about yourself: thoughtful loving parents who instill certain qualities in you as a kid and as a person. Learning from other people, because I think we take for granted the people that we are around. No matter who it is, or where it is, we still can give something to them and learn something in return. I think there is a huge wealth of knowledge out there-just being in touch with it and opening yourself up, that’s important.

Any last words to our readers.

I don’t think you could ever say it too much: go out and enjoy life for yourself and really look inside to see what makes you happy. And when that doesn’t always work, grab a friend because there’s always strength in numbers. That helped me out a lot through life, being able to share experiences with my friends that, growing up, really gave me the strength and confidence I needed to do the things that I had inside of me.

Do you want to thank anyone?

The thank you list would go on forever. There’re a lot of people who have helped me through the years-and for that I am deeply grateful. That help and support means the world to me, ’cause without that I wouldn’t have the confidence to do a lot of the things that I have done in my life