Rome Shoot Out Team

Portraits by Scott Serfas

Marie-France Roy, MFR. TransWorld SNOWboarding Team Shoot Out. PHOTO: Scott Serfas

Marie-France Roy
Age: 25
Stance: Regular
Stance width: 21.05 inches
Stance angles: 21 degrees on the front, -21 in back
Board: Rome Lofi 150
Boots: ThirtyTwo Lashed, size 8.5
Bindings: Rome Madison
What was the highlight of the week at Bear? Everyone working all night longs for eight nights in a row to make it happen
What was the low point of the week? We didn’t get one night or time to party all together. And it was really icy.
What day/obstacle/shoot was the gnarliest for you and why? I didn’t even hit everything because sometimes I just felt like I was gonna get worked. The sketchiest for me was probably when I tried to hit that step up and ended up flying backwards and landing on my back onto rocks—it sucked. At first I didn’t know if I was gonna hit it because I thought there would be quite a bit of compression. But then I watched the guys hit it once and it looked mellow. So I thought I had it, pointed it from even further than the guys to make sure I had enough speed. I guess I just couldn’t handle that compression. I might have hit a soft spot on the lip as well… I felt like I sucked big time. Ahh!
What was the most impressive riding you saw go down? All the boys killed it and worked so hard. Bjorn looked like he could barely walk after every crash, but would always keep going and get the shot. Eiki was amazing on that roof wallride thing, Will and Laurent rode everything really good as well and they got tons of shots.
How was the Team Shoot Out different than other events for you? Yeah, it’s a very different concept. It’s cool to have team contests once in a while for sure.
Why is it inevitable that your team will win? I don’t like to claim wins but I hope we do well. Everyone worked real hard and got real good stuff considering the conditions.
Will Lavigne. TransWorld SNOWboarding Team Shoot Out. PHOTO: Scott Serfas
Will Lavigne
Age: 21
Height: 5’’10”
Weight: 160 pounds
Stance: Regular
Stance width: 22 inches
Stance angles: 15 degrees on the front, -15 in back
Board: Rome Artifact 150, Agent 154, Mod 158
Boots: Vans BFB, size 11
Bindings: Rome 390
What was the highlight of the week at Bear? It was the third or fourth night when we were riding that step up to step down. We passed a lot of time on the step up in the beginning. There was a lot of kick in the take off and it was short so there was a lot of G force. We had to work our way up to get comfortable on the step up, and then after a good trick we moved to the step down. I did the step down about five times—the landing was so flat. I got done first and then Eiki stopped a few minutes after. BJ called his last run, he did a few half Cabs so we all thought he would do a last one and stop after that. So, he went, he did a Cab three and landed so far down the flat landing. It was about 4:00 a.m. and we had been snowboarding for eight hours straight. The thing is that BJ rode with a sprained ankle the whole session with duct tape on it … it was impressive.
What was the low point of the week? At first when I heard we would do the Team Shoot Out I was trying to imagine some set up and stuff we could do. I thought maybe we could do the whole thing at night so it’d be “original.” But after thinking a little further I realize the whole mountain would be a big ice cube because of the hot weather during the day. So I didn’t say nothing about that, and when I got to Bear, Cavan (our TM) told me that we’re doing the thing at night. So yeah, the snow was firm/hard. At some point jumps in run were really icy and landings, too. It’s for sure really different to shred ice compared to slush … well, you know. The Bear crew helped us a lot.
What shoot was the gnarliest for you and why? The first day and first set up was the down rail. It was the hardest for me. The whole thing was super icy, especially the in run. It was pretty much “unfixable.” So we had to deal with it and ride on ice. I flew in the night before from the East Coast, chilled all day at the house, went to ride around 6:00 p.m. and got down around 5:00 a.m. I was just really tired I guess. I had huge expectations on the rail and I didn’t land anything I thought I would do. After that day I got better into the “vampire mode riding” and it was all good.
What was the most impressive riding you saw go down? We rode that roof at the bottom of the resort—it was like a gap to roof ride. About 45 degrees and the landing was straight shingle. We put some snow on it but it stayed pretty sticky. Eiki went and did a lay back on the top of the thing. You had to be really on it because going a little bit further or falling from that height can f—k you up real bad.
How was the Team Shoot Out different than other events for you? Most of the time events in snowboarding are either contests, photo shoots, or video shoots, but the Team Shoot Out is everything at the same time. It has never happened before to be judged on videos and photos. It’s kinda teamwork at the same time. Tricks have to be good; the filming, photos, set up has to be original, and then after you’ve filmed everything, a big part of the project is the editing—video has to be good. So yeah, it’s a teamwork …
Why is it inevitable that your team will win? We flipped some money to TransWorld and we’’ll send some champagne and babes, is that enough?

Laurent-Nicolas Paquin, LNP. TransWorld SNOWboarding Team Shoot Out. PHOTO: Scott Serfas
Laurent-Nicolas Paquin
Age: 23
Height: Don’t know… average
Weight: Not too light, not too heavy
Stance: Goofy
Stance width: 21.5 inches
Stance angles: 13 degrees on the front, -13 in back
Board: Rome Artifact 1985 147
Boots: Rome Libertine, size 8.5
Bindings: Rome 390
What was the highlight of the week at Bear? The house we had, it was humongous!
What was the low point of the week? Night shooting, icy setups, and super late starts and super late finishes.
What day/obstacle/shoot was the gnarliest for you and why? The jump to A-Frame …so gnarly couldn’t even ride it —hated that thing!
What was the most impressive riding you saw go down? Everybody! Marie did some serious shit, like that I would do!
How was the Team Shoot Out different than other events for you? I don’t do events, so it was way different than a night outside to shoot a rail. I’ve never ended a session at 4 :00 a.m. …ever!
Why is it inevitable that your team will win? Cause we had setups that weren’t too circus style and we have such a diversity in between every rider that the little movie is gonna kick ass! Serfas killed it picturewise!
Bjorn Leines, BJ Leines. TransWorld SNOWboarding Team Shoot Out. PHOTO: Scott Serfas
Bjorn Leines
Age: 32
Height: 5’’10”
Weight: 160 pounds
Stance: Regular
Stance width: 23.5 inches wide
Stance angles: 18 degrees on the front, -11 in back
Board: Rome SDS Mod 158
Boots: Rome Folsom boots, size 9
Bindings: Rome Targa
What was the highlight of the week at Bear? A sweet hang with the team while getting to lap Bear’s park … and hot tubs and steam showers at the house!
What was the low point of the week? Feeling like a zombie since our days turned into nights.
What day/obstacle/shoot was the gnarliest for you and why? The A frame roof gap ride was the gnarliest for sure. Just mainly because we were landing on a shingled roof.  If you weren’t completely flat based your edges would catch on the shingles!
What was the most impressive riding you saw go down? The first night on the two rails really impressed me. Everyone was locking in the sickest tricks with such an easy style approach and solid consistency.
How was the Team Shoot Out different than other events for you? Different since everybody involved had the same goal and outlined look or feel that we were going for. And riding and shooting for seven nights straight was challenging.
Why is it inevitable that your team will win? After working with Bear Mountain and being able to build insane features, combined with sick photos from Serfas, good shredding with rad tricks and a good edit from Cavan and the SDS we are super stoked on the final product!

Eiki Helgason. TransWorld Team Shoot Out. PHOTO: Scott Serfas
Eiki Helgason
Age: 21
Height: 5’’6”
Weight: 160 pounds
Stance: Regular
Stance width: 24.5 inches
Stance angles: 18 degrees on the front, -15 in back
Board: Rome Artifact 1985 147, Rome Mod 154
Boots: Rome Libertine 9.0
Bindings: Rome 390s
What was the highlight of the week at Bear? The highlight was to ride that jump feature because it wasn’t too big but it was so fun. It was like riding in a skatepark because it had so much stuff to do, I’ve never seen a feature with so many possibilities.
What was the low point of the week? The low point was the first night when everybody was still trying to switch over to night mode, that was a bit hard.
What day/obstacle/shoot was the gnarliest for you and why? The jump to the A frame wallride was the gnarliest because it was big, sticky, high speed, icy, and sketchy and if someone would have gone a little too big he would have landed on some sketchy fence and gotten really hurt.
What was the most impressive riding you saw go down? I was impressed when Bjorn did the Cab 3 first try on that icy step down jump, it was crazy.
How was the Team Shoot Out different than other events for you? This was the best idea for a contest ever, ever since I saw the Skate & Create thing I was hoping to see something like that on a snowboard, too. For me that’s a contest that shows real snowboarding and not only 1080s, so that’s cool.
Why is it inevitable that your team will win? I think we did some cool stuff, our obstacles were cool and and we rode as good as we could compared to how icy it was so I think we did a good job.

Rome Media Crew

Scott Serfas. TransWorld Team Shoot Out. PHOTO: Scott Serfas
Scott Serfas
Title: Transworld Senior Photographer
Home: Vancouver, Canada
Specialty: Snowboarding
Years shooting: 17
Camera of choice: Canon
Dream Shoot: Since I already shot 12 sunny pow days using a helicopter in Alaska, my new dream shoot would be on a yacht in the South Pacific shooting the best surfing in the world.
The Team Shoot Out was: Fun, frustrating, painful, exciting, scary, nerve racking and long.

John Cavan. TransWorld Team Shoot Out. PHOTO: Scott Serfas
Rome SDS Team Videographer
John Cavan
Home: In the van
Job Title: Rome Team Manager/Director, Kids On Shred
Specialty: Filming/motivational speaking
Years shooting: 9
Years shooting snowboarding: 8 (thanks Matt and Danny Kass)
Camera of choice: Panasonic HVX
Dream Shoot: Besides the obvious Hustler Beach shoot in Thailand, it would involve either pow and a heli, or some new exotic rail spot. Either would include a mix between the OG Grenade crew and the current Rome team … add some friends, some old legends, and perhaps a Dave Schiff in there to make it interesting.
The Team Shoot Out was: A combination of a lot of layers of Rome, from the designers to the team, to the filmers and photographers, we all went to war together, we all worked with the amazing staff of Bear, we all braved the night, we all went through the horrible/wonderful experience of Vampire week, most importantly we all experienced it together and I think the end result shows this. We also all drank a lot of sparks that week that might be the thing I remember most …that horrible orange drink.

Bear Mountain Park Crew

Rome Bear Mountain TransWorld Team Shoot out. PHOTO: Scott Serfas

Title: SPT Project Manager for Bear Mountain/Rome Snowboards

Resort: Bear Mountain, California

Mike Binnell
Title: SPT Project Manager for Bear Mountain/Rome Snowboards
Resort: Bear Mountain, California
Years riding: 24
Years building: 15
What was the greatest challenge in constructing your venue? Not allowing myself to be concerned about what any of the other teams or builders were doing.
What was the highlight of the week? Watching the best snowboard team in the world riding all of the features that the boys of Bear Mt. have always wanted to build and finally delivered.
What was the low point of the week? Does not compute-rrrr…
What day was the gnarliest for you/crew and why? There is nothing gnarly about doing what you love when you have confidence that the your crew is the best.
What was the most impressive riding you saw go down? Too hard to list just one moment but the event that stands out the most would be the A frame night. This old vet was reminded why he still has passion for our sport.
How was the Team Shoot Out different than other events for you? All events are unique, but there is something about being involved with an event that allows for this much creatively and rider input. Thanks to everybody involved for creating one of the best snowboarding events I have ever had the honor of being involved with.

Clayton Shoemaker
Title: Bear Mountain Park Development and Marketing Coordinator
Resort: Bear Mountain, California
Years riding: 22
Years building: 4 years of park staff and 8 years building.
What was the greatest challenge in constructing your venue? Location and snow—we really can’t hide anything here at Bear.  We don’t have a backside to go build features, so everyone can see what’s going on.  Plus snow is at a low in the spring.  A lot of the time the snow you need is not right in front of you.  That means a lot of pushing took place to get the snow to the area that we wanted to construct the features.
What was the highlight of the week? The fact that all the features were hit is huge.  Everyone worked really hard, riders and builders.  That much build time and that much ride time can really make you dig deep.  It’s not like you can take a time out from everything, once the build was done then is was maintenance and a small production crew for the filming.  (Blah, Blah) Pretty much the highlight was amazing snowboarding went down on amazing features and no one got hurt.  Yeah.
What was the low point of the week? No lows. Keeping it positive —keep’s it all moving forward.
What day was the gnarliest for you/crew and why? I think it was staying up all night with the riders to film, and moving that huge ass wall into some crazy locations for shooting.  When it get’s that late or that early in the morning you really have to keep up on your safety.  Not just for you, but your crew and the riders.  I still could not imagine hitting some of these features at 3:00 am.  (That is gnarly to think about as well, that is what really makes these real professional riders)
What was the most impressive riding you saw go down? Sorry, but every night I was impressed.  These guy’s and a lady came to win.  They pushed it hard every night.  Film and shot’s are one thing to see, but it’s that time between a lot of people don’t see.  When you see a rider hurting after a bad slam and just get’s right back on the sled to go up and hit it again.   Keep in mind it was anytime between 10:00 pm to 3:00 am this riding was going down.  That on top of all the amazing riders stepping at everything we threw at them.  SO IMPRESSIVE!
How was the Team Shootout different than other events for you? You really worked with the riders and filmers.  It was not like, ‘Here’s what we built, now slay it, see you later.’  It was the most intimate photo shoot you could imagine.  We spent hours with the filmers and riders.  I spoke with the ROME team more that week then with my lady, and I live with her.  Everyday in each other’s face’s getting this kind of work done is a serious relationship.
Additional Contributing Bear Park Crew: Desi Hauer, Brandon Reppond, Dan Nielsen, Greg Sebree, Bob Tonseth, Will Keating, Jesse Hallstead

Special thanks to Bear Mtn and Big Bear Vacations, check them out when your planning your next trip