MCLEAN, Va. (January 13, 2004) — Overall sales for the entire winter sports market (including specialty and chain stores), decreased slightly by 1.65 percent in dollars to $652.0 million compared to $663.0 million in 2002 for August through November according to the SnowSports Industries America (SIA) Retail Audit. Unit sales were ahead 0.38 percent. Sales at specialty ski and snowboard shops were down 1.66 percent in dollars compared to last season. In dollars, that translates to $522.0 million in sales compared to $530.8 million in 2002 and $495.9 million in 2001. Unit sales were up from last season tracking 2.2 percent ahead.

Sales for just the month of November in specialty stores were down 9.0 percent in dollars to $266.7 millioncompared to $293.1 in 2002. “Prior to the holidays consumers were hunting for bargains in winter sportsequipment and apparel. Significant units of carry-over products went out the door at specialty stores duringthe month of November,” said Julie Lynch, Director of Market Research for SIA, the not-for-profit industrytrade group that represents manufacturers and distributors of snow sports products. The SIA Retail Audittracks and reports sales in all snow sports product categories. This is the second report of six that looked atsales through March 31, 2004, the end of the winter season.

All equipment (alpine, snowboard, Nordic and telemark) in specialty stores was down 5.24 percent, tracking at$230.0 million compared to $242.8 in 2002. Alpine equipment (including skis, boots, bindings, poles andsystems) decreased 14.3 percent to $140.1 million as compared to $163.4 million last year.

Snowboardequipment (including boards, boots and bindings) was up 10.4 percent to $79.6 million. Sales for snowboardequipment in 2002 tracked at $72.2 million. Nordic equipment (including skis, boots, bindings and poles) salespropelled forward, tracking at $8.2 million, an increase of 39.1 percent and telemark equipment (includingskis, boots, and bindings), a new category in the retail audit, tracked at $2.1 million.

Accordingto Scott Jaeger of Leisure Trends Group, “With the economy in the doldrums, specialty store equipmentbuyers thought well ahead and went bargain hunting. The bottom line was also augmented by retailersaggressively selling products carried over from last season.”

Apparel saw slight gains, increasing 3.3 percent to $160.5 million compared to $155.3 million in 2002. Theaccessories category saw a slight decline of 0.95 percent to $131.5 million compared to $132.7 last season.

Junior Alpine Ski Equipment is Hot

Alpine ski sales (including systems) were down 11.1 percent in dollars to $67.3 million. However, ski bindingsystems had strong sales so far this season, gaining 20.6 percent to $21.1 million. Aggressive pricing for theski binding systems could have helped propel these increases. The ski systems sold for an average retailprice of $600 in November 2002 compared to this November in which they are selling for $518. In addition, atthe end of November, ski systems were 25 percent sold through.

More and more skiers are preparing for that epic powder day; there has been growth in fat skis, gaining 17.2percent to $2.4 million. Another hot ski is juniors. Junior skis have increased 8.0 percent in dollars to $6.0million, while gaining 25 percent in units. In addition, customers are looking for a bargain as carry-over skishave increased in sales slightly more than 8,000 units from last season (August through November). All othercategories had double digit declines. Interestingly, women’s specific skis saw an increase of 26.4 percent inspecialty stores.

Alpine boots were the unit sales leader in the alpine equipment category. However, boots declined 13.9percent in dollars to $52.3 million compared to last season. The categories with the most action, juniors, wereup 17.2 percent to $5.5 million. High performance (down 15.7 percent to $21.1 million), sport performance(down 14.8 percent to13.5 million) and recreation boots (down 39.7 percent to $5.2 million) all saw declines. Even lower prices on soft boots (down $45) couldn’t firm up soft boot sales as dollars declined 15.5 percent to3.3 million.

As the season progresses, look for low prices and close-outs this spring. Carry-over boots did wellduring the pre-holiday period, increasing 42.1 percent to $3.7 million, a gain of almost 7,000 pairs in unit salesfrom the previous season.

Alpine binding sales were down 23.7 percent in dollars to $17.3 million. Also, binding sales (counting skisystem sales) also decreased 4.4 percent in dollars. Junior bindings, the only category to see any growth,were up 9.6 percent in dollars to $3.6 million. Both DIN 8-11 (down 31.5 percent to $7.6 million) and DIN 12-14 (down 27.3 percent to $5.2 million) saw significant declines. Also skiers aren’t buying new poles to go withtheir new skis. Alpine poles declined 26.7 percent in dollars to $3.2 million.

Snowboard Equipment is Hot and Back on Top

Snowboard equipment is flying off the shelves at specialty retailers across the country. Boards increased 11.2percent in dollars to $39.5 million and 11.7 percent in units. The two hottest categories, those products seeingincreases in dollar sales, were freestyle and all mountain boards. Both made significant gains. Freestyleboards were up 24.7 percent to $15.8 million and all mountain boards gained 21.5 percent to $2.9 million.However, the biggest seller in unit sales, freeride boards, declined slightly by 4.1 percent in dollars or $14.0million. Retailers had plenty of boards left over from last season. Carry-over sales surged ahead 53 percent to$3.5 million.

Snowboard boots just edged out boards as the category leader in unit sales for snowboard equipment.Snowboard boots gained 11.3 percent in dollars to $22.6 million. Non step-in boots were up 14.9 percent to$19.7 million.

Snowboard bindings were also up 7.3 percent in dollars to $17.5 million. Non step-in bindingsincreased 12.4 percent in dollars to $15.7 million. Step-in boots and bindings have become almost nonexistentin the snowboard world. Inventories are at half of what they were last year with sales making up lessthan 5 percent of each category. In addition, both carry-over boots and bindings were selling, an increase indollars of 146.4 percent and 76.8 percent, respectively.

Free the Heel; Telemark and Nordic Sales See Significant Gains

Skiers are looking for alternative ways to get down the mountain. Telemark ski equipment, a new category tothe Retail Audit, saw sales of $2.1 million which was a gain of 72.8 percent over last season. Nordicequipment sales in specialty stores were hot in pre-season. Every category made significant gains withincreases in skis (up 41.3 percent to $3.5 million), boots (up 31.7 percent to $2.5 million), bindings (up 66.1percent to $1.4 million) and poles (up 19.6 percent to $812,587) dollar sales.

Kids are Hitting the Slopes; Big Increases in Junior Apparel

Apparel tops tracked 2.9 percent ahead of last season in dollars to $97.7 million. The clear winners wereinsulated parkas (up 12.1 percent to $36.8 million), softshell parkas (up 70.6 percent to $4.5 million) andfleece (including vests) (up 7.8 percent to $21.2 million). In addition, women’s insulated parkas did wellincreasing 22.6 percent to $16.2 million which was 29 percent more in dollar sales than men’s. The juniorinsulated parkas were a hot product so far this season, increasing 5.4 percent to $8.1 million. Shell parkas(down 13.6 percent to $21.3 million), vests (down 18.1 percent to $1.4 million) and sweaters (down 14.7percent to $5.8 million) all declined.

Bottoms were up slightly, gaining 1.9 percent in dollars to $26.0 million with units tracking 8.4 percent aheadof last season. Softshell (up 35.0 percent to $494,855) and stretch waist pants (up 22.6 percent to $2.8million) saw increases. Junior bottoms which make up more than a quarter of the alpine bottoms category in units, gained 10.7 percent in dollars to $4.6 million. Carry-over bottoms increased 57.4 percent in units and 18.9 percent in dollars.

Snowboard apparel kept pace with equipment sales, gaining 11.8 percent in dollars to $32.8 million.Snowboard tops gained 14.7 percent to $18.7 million while snowboard bottoms declined 4.6 percent to $10.6million.

However, the big news in this category is juniors. Junior tops jumped ahead 23.3 percent to $2.3million while bottoms gained 21.8 percent to $1.5 million. Junior snowboard apparel is close to selling asmany units as women’s. Women’s snowboard apparel also did very well as tops tracked 10.6 percent ahead($5.4 million) while bottoms were also up 14.8 percent ($2.7 million). Retailers are blowing out the excesssnowboard apparel this season, carry over units and dollars were up 96 percent and 82 percent, respectively.

Lower Prices Boosted Apparel Accessories Sales

So far this season, equipment accessories are tracking behind 11.2 percent to $62.9 million. The onlycategory that winter sports participants are buying is sunglasses (up 4.5 percent to $10.4 million). All othercategories saw declines, this includes: snowdecks/skates (down 52.8 percent to $395,816), goggles (down0.35 percent to $7.7 million), auto racks (down 9.5 percent to $13.3 million), snowshoes (down 4.3 percent to$3.0 million) and helmets (down 30.3 percent to $10.5 million).Consumers were buying apparel accessories at slightly lower prices than last season. Apparel accessoriesare up 10.8 percent in dollars to $68.6 million. Every category saw double digit increases except turtlenecks(down 12.8 percent to $3.6 million) and headwear (down 1.2 percent to $11.4 million). Winter boots (up 129.2percent in dollars to $4.4 million), gloves (up 11.9 percent to $9.9 million), mitts (up 2.4 percent to $3.6million), socks (up 11.1 percent to $5.9 million) and base layer (up 10.8 percent to $16.8 million) all jumpedahead.

Chains Come Back To Life

MCLEAN, Va. (January 13, 2004) — Overall sales for the entire winter sports market (including specialtyand chain stores), decreased slightly by 1.65 percent in dollars to $652.0 million compared to $663.0 million in2002 for the pre-holiday period (August through November) according to the SnowSports Industries America(SIA) Retail Audit. Unit sales were ahead 0.38 percent. Sales at chain stores were down just slightly at 1.6percent compared to the same period in 2002. In dollars, that translates to $130.0 million in sales comparedto $132.1 million last season. The unit sales tracked 3.6 percent. Sales for just the month of November inchain stores were up 4.7 percent in dollars to $70.3 million compared to $67.1 in 2002.

“Winter sportsequipment and accessory sales came back strong in the month of November for chain stores as consumersbought new products prior to the holidays,” said Julie Lynch, Director of Market Research for SIA, the not-forprofitindustry trade group that represents manufacturers and distributors of snow sports products. The SIARetail Audit tracks and reports sales in all snow sports product categories.

This is the second report of six thatlooks at sales through March 31, 2004, the end of the winter season.All equipment (alpine, snowboard, Nordic and telemark) for chain stores was up 1.7 percent to $42.3 millionfrom $41.6 million in 2002. In addition, units gained 5.4 percent. Alpine equipment (including skis, boots,bindings, poles and systems) was up 5.2 percent to $20.4 million as compared to $19.3 million last year. Unitsgained 14.5 percent.

Snowboard equipment (including boards, boots and bindings) was down 3.6 percent to$20.2 million. Sales for snowboard equipment in 2002 tracked at $21.0 million. Nordic equipment (includingskis, boots, bindings and poles), a bright spot, was up 28.8 percent to $1.3 million. Telemark equipment(including skis, boots and bindings), a new category in the Retail Audit, tracked at $411,977 (up 73.3 percentin dolry in units, gained 10.7 percent in dollars to $4.6 million. Carry-over bottoms increased 57.4 percent in units and 18.9 percent in dollars.

Snowboard apparel kept pace with equipment sales, gaining 11.8 percent in dollars to $32.8 million.Snowboard tops gained 14.7 percent to $18.7 million while snowboard bottoms declined 4.6 percent to $10.6million.

However, the big news in this category is juniors. Junior tops jumped ahead 23.3 percent to $2.3million while bottoms gained 21.8 percent to $1.5 million. Junior snowboard apparel is close to selling asmany units as women’s. Women’s snowboard apparel also did very well as tops tracked 10.6 percent ahead($5.4 million) while bottoms were also up 14.8 percent ($2.7 million). Retailers are blowing out the excesssnowboard apparel this season, carry over units and dollars were up 96 percent and 82 percent, respectively.

Lower Prices Boosted Apparel Accessories Sales

So far this season, equipment accessories are tracking behind 11.2 percent to $62.9 million. The onlycategory that winter sports participants are buying is sunglasses (up 4.5 percent to $10.4 million). All othercategories saw declines, this includes: snowdecks/skates (down 52.8 percent to $395,816), goggles (down0.35 percent to $7.7 million), auto racks (down 9.5 percent to $13.3 million), snowshoes (down 4.3 percent to$3.0 million) and helmets (down 30.3 percent to $10.5 million).Consumers were buying apparel accessories at slightly lower prices than last season. Apparel accessoriesare up 10.8 percent in dollars to $68.6 million. Every category saw double digit increases except turtlenecks(down 12.8 percent to $3.6 million) and headwear (down 1.2 percent to $11.4 million). Winter boots (up 129.2percent in dollars to $4.4 million), gloves (up 11.9 percent to $9.9 million), mitts (up 2.4 percent to $3.6million), socks (up 11.1 percent to $5.9 million) and base layer (up 10.8 percent to $16.8 million) all jumpedahead.

Chains Come Back To Life

MCLEAN, Va. (January 13, 2004) — Overall sales for the entire winter sports market (including specialtyand chain stores), decreased slightly by 1.65 percent in dollars to $652.0 million compared to $663.0 million in2002 for the pre-holiday period (August through November) according to the SnowSports Industries America(SIA) Retail Audit. Unit sales were ahead 0.38 percent. Sales at chain stores were down just slightly at 1.6percent compared to the same period in 2002. In dollars, that translates to $130.0 million in sales comparedto $132.1 million last season. The unit sales tracked 3.6 percent. Sales for just the month of November inchain stores were up 4.7 percent in dollars to $70.3 million compared to $67.1 in 2002.

“Winter sportsequipment and accessory sales came back strong in the month of November for chain stores as consumersbought new products prior to the holidays,” said Julie Lynch, Director of Market Research for SIA, the not-forprofitindustry trade group that represents manufacturers and distributors of snow sports products. The SIARetail Audit tracks and reports sales in all snow sports product categories.

This is the second report of six thatlooks at sales through March 31, 2004, the end of the winter season.All equipment (alpine, snowboard, Nordic and telemark) for chain stores was up 1.7 percent to $42.3 millionfrom $41.6 million in 2002. In addition, units gained 5.4 percent. Alpine equipment (including skis, boots,bindings, poles and systems) was up 5.2 percent to $20.4 million as compared to $19.3 million last year. Unitsgained 14.5 percent.

Snowboard equipment (including boards, boots and bindings) was down 3.6 percent to$20.2 million. Sales for snowboard equipment in 2002 tracked at $21.0 million. Nordic equipment (includingskis, boots, bindings and poles), a bright spot, was up 28.8 percent to $1.3 million. Telemark equipment(including skis, boots and bindings), a new category in the Retail Audit, tracked at $411,977 (up 73.3 percentin dollars).Apparel was down 7.2 percent to $50.1 million as compared to $54.0 million last season while accessoriesincreased 2.9 percent to $37.6 million as compared to 2002, which was $36.6 million.

Ski System Trend Hits Chains

Alpine ski sales (including ski binding systems) increased 9.0 percent in dollars to $9.6 million while unitsgained 23.9 percent. Increases were due to the sale of ski binding systems (up 101.5 percent to $2.9 million).Lower prices helped propel system sales; average retail plunged from $478 last season to the currentaverage retail price of $390. The action was in junior skis (up 22.9 percent to $601,455), fat skis (up 73.2 percent to $332,813) and twintips (up 27.6 percent to $326,266). Carve (down 27.6 percent to $382,865) and skiboards (down 57.8 percentto $103,111) both tracked behind. In addition, the largest unit sales category, midfat skis, were down 12.0percent to $3.6 million Carry-over ski units jumped 29.7 percent but dollars fell 12 percent as retailerscleared out excess inventory. Women’s specific skis saw an increase of 16 percent in unit sales over lastseason.

Alpine boots also experienced gains, increasing 7.0 percent to $7.3 million. High performance boots are hotthis year, increasing 46.1 percent to $2.1 million. Both sport (up 2.0 percent to $2.2 million) and soft (up 40.0percent to $470,982) made substantial gains. Sales of both junior (down 3.7 percent $421,166) and recreationboots (down 19.4 percent $1.1 million) declined.Stand alone alpine binding sales declined just slightly, 0.7 percent to $2.6 million. Adding back in unit sales toski binding systems, sales were up 16.7 percent. The DIN 8-11, 57 percent of all freestanding units sold, wasdown 4.4 percent to $1.4 million while DIN 12-14 made gains of 11.4 percent in dollars to $651,884. Juniorbindings were up 6.7 percent to $301,735. According to Scott Jaeger of Leisure Trends Group, “Parentsbought almost a complete package of alpine equipment for their children. Unit sales for skis, boots andbindings were almost equal.” Lastly, plunging carry-over sales dragged down the entire alpine pole category(down 21.4 percent in dollars to $910,227). However, adult poles increased 32.7 percent to $749,088.All Nordic equipment categories saw increases in sales; skis (up 22.6 percent to $486,608), boots (up 45.8percent to $515,624), bindings (up 10.5 percent to $148,875) and poles (up 18.7 percent to $128,708).

Snowboard Sales Increase During the Pre-holiday Period

The pre-holiday period was good for snowboard sales in chain stores. Boards increased 5.3 percent in dollarsto $9.3 million, while units increased 17.8 percent. The increase in sales was due mainly to carry-over boardswhich gained 46.8 percent to $2.3 million. Carry-over boards account for 39 percent of all boards sold so farthis season. Freeride and freestyle boards gained 8.7 percent ($3.3 million) and 46.7 percent ($1.8 million),respectively.

Both snowboard boots and bindings declined. Boots decreased 7.9 percent in dollars to $6.3 million whilebindings tracked behind 12.9 percent in dollars to $4.6 million. Non step-in boots and bindings both declinedin dollars, 3.0 percent ($5.1 million) and 11.3 percent ($3.8 million), respectively.

Women and Junior Snowboard Apparel is Hot in Chains

Alpine apparel got off to a slow start in chain stores. Alpine tops declined 7.3 percent in dollars to $33.4million. The only categories to see any type of increase were softshell parkas (up 160.8 percent to $671,425),fleece (includes vests) (up 11.7 percent to $7.6 million) and sweaters (up 6.8 percent to $1.8 million).Insulated parkas and shell parkas both saw declines, 8.7 percent ($10.2 million) and 10.9 percent ($10.0million), respectively. However, women’s apparel helped both categories. Women’s insulated parkasincreased 12.9 percent to $3.1 million and women’s shell parkas edged up 17.8 percent to $3.5 million. Inaddition, vests (no fleece) plunged 15.4 percent to $368,0667 which could be due to the increase in averageretail price from $39 last season to $74 this year. Chains store retailers have very little carry-over apparel tosell. This category declined 37.5 percent from last season. Carry-over accounted for 8 percent of all alpine topdollars sold, down from 12 percent last year.Alpine bottoms struggled even more, declining 18.5 percent in dollars to $7.2 million. The only bottomcategories to see any up tick were bibs (up 164.0 percent to $719,811), insulated waist pants (up 4.4 percentto $761,595) and softshell waist pants (up 126.9 percent to $73,265). All other alpine bottoms saw declines;shell waist pants (down 14.1 percent to $2.6 million), stretch waist pants (down 12.6 percent to $259,742),fleece waist pants (down 44.4 percent to $477,117) and juniors (down 24.8 percent to $962,807).

Snowboard apparel fared slightly better (up 2.5 percent in dollars to $8.8 million). Snowboard tops were up(14.8 percent in dollars to $5.2 million) while snowboard bottoms were down (1.1 percent in dollars to $3.0million). Women and junior snowboard apparel helped the category as a whole. Women (up 35.0 percent to$1.9 million) and junior (up 50.7 percent to $854,412) snowboard tops gained significantly. Also, women (up0.6 percent to $1.1 million) and junior (up 10.8 percent to $426,637) snowboard bottoms saw an up tick.

The Snowdecks/Skates Trend is Over

Equipment accessories were up 4.7 percent to $16.9 million. The big sellers during the August throughNovember time period were goggles (up 12.4 percent to $1.5 million) and sunglasses (up 26.1 percent to $6.1million). All other categories, including snowdecks/skates (down 39.8 percent to $126,284), auto racks (down20.5 percent to $2.0 million), snowshoes (down 3.1 percent to $525,587) and helmets (down 22.5 percent to$1.8 million) saw declines.

Apparel accessories came back to life in the month of November as consumers prepared for the coldweather. This category was up slightly 1.4 percent to $20.8 million. Almost all the categories saw increases:winter boots (up 65.2 percent to $1.6 million), gloves (up 0.8 percent to $3.5 million), base layer (up 2.8percent to $5.8 million), turtlenecks (up 22.0 percent to $480,702) and headwear (up 5.9 percent to $3.1million). Two categories saw declines, mitts (down 6.9 percent to $758,729) and socks (down 36.7 percent to$1.3 million).s).Apparel was down 7.2 percent to $50.1 million as compared to $54.0 million last season while accessoriesincreased 2.9 percent to $37.6 million as compared to 2002, which was $36.6 million.

Ski System Trend Hits Chains

Alpine ski sales (including ski binding systems) increased 9.0 percent in dollars to $9.6 million while unitsgained 23.9 percent. Increases were due to the sale of ski binding systems (up 101.5 percent to $2.9 million).Lower prices helped propel system sales; average retail plunged from $478 last season to the currentaverage retail price of $390. The action was in junior skis (up 22.9 percent to $601,455), fat skis (up 73.2 percent to $332,813) and twintips (up 27.6 percent to $326,266). Carve (down 27.6 percent to $382,865) and skiboards (down 57.8 percentto $103,111) both tracked behind. In addition, the largest unit sales category, midfat skis, were down 12.0percent to $3.6 million Carry-over ski units jumped 29.7 percent but dollars fell 12 percent as retailerscleared out excess inventory. Women’s specific skis saw an increase of 16 percent in unit sales over lastseason.

Alpine boots also experienced gains, increasing 7.0 percent to $7.3 million. High performance boots are hotthis year, increasing 46.1 percent to $2.1 million. Both sport (up 2.0 percent to $2.2 million) and soft (up 40.0percent to $470,982) made substantial gains. Sales of both junior (down 3.7 percent $421,166) and recreationboots (down 19.4 percent $1.1 million) declined.Stand alone alpine binding sales declined just slightly, 0.7 percent to $2.6 million. Adding back in unit sales toski binding systems, sales were up 16.7 percent. The DIN 8-11, 57 percent of all freestanding units sold, wasdown 4.4 percent to $1.4 million while DIN 12-14 made gains of 11.4 percent in dollars to $651,884. Juniorbindings were up 6.7 percent to $301,735. According to Scott Jaeger of Leisure Trends Group, “Parentsbought almost a complete package of alpine equipment for their children. Unit sales for skis, boots andbindings were almost equal.” Lastly, plunging carry-over sales dragged down the entire alpine pole category(down 21.4 percent in dollars to $910,227). However, adult poles increased 32.7 percent to $749,088.All Nordic equipment categories saw increases in sales; skis (up 22.6 percent to $486,608), boots (up 45.8percent to $515,624), bindings (up 10.5 percent to $148,875) and poles (up 18.7 percent to $128,708).

Snowboard Sales Increase During the Pre-holiday Period

The pre-holiday period was good for snowboard sales in chain stores. Boards increased 5.3 percent in dollarsto $9.3 million, while units increased 17.8 percent. The increase in sales was due mainly to carry-over boardswhich gained 46.8 percent to $2.3 million. Carry-over boards account for 39 percent of all boards sold so farthis season. Freeride and freestyle boards gained 8.7 percent ($3.3 million) and 46.7 percent ($1.8 million),respectively.

Both snowboard boots and bindings declined. Boots decreased 7.9 percent in dollars to $6.3 million whilebindings tracked behind 12.9 percent in dollars to $4.6 million. Non step-in boots and bindings both declinedin dollars, 3.0 percent ($5.1 million) and 11.3 percent ($3.8 million), respectively.

Women and Junior Snowboard Apparel is Hot in Chains

Alpine apparel got off to a slow start in chain stores. Alpine tops declined 7.3 percent in dollars to $33.4million. The only categories to see any type of increase were softshell parkas (up 160.8 percent to $671,425),fleece (includes vests) (up 11.7 percent to $7.6 million) and sweaters (up 6.8 percent to $1.8 million).Insulated parkas and shell parkas both saw declines, 8.7 percent ($10.2 million) and 10.9 percent ($10.0million), respectively. However, women’s apparel helped both categories. Women’s insulated parkasincreased 12.9 percent to $3.1 million and women’s shell parkas edged up 17.8 percent to $3.5 million. Inaddition, vests (no fleece) plunged 15.4 percent to $368,067 which could be due to the increase in averageretail price from $39 last season to $74 this year. Chains store retailers have very little carry-over apparel tosell. This category declined 37.5 percent from last season. Carry-over accounted for 8 percent of all alpine topdollars sold, down from 12 percent last year.Alpine bottoms struggled even more, declining 18.5 percent in dollars to $7.2 million. The only bottomcategories to see any up tick were bibs (up 164.0 percent to $719,811), insulated waist pants (up 4.4 percentto $761,595) and softshell waist pants (up 126.9 percent to $73,265). All other alpine bottoms saw declines;shell waist pants (down 14.1 percent to $2.6 million), stretch waist pants (down 12.6 percent to $259,742),fleece waist pants (down 44.4 percent to $477,117) and juniors (down 24.8 percent to $962,807).

Snowboard apparel fared slightly better (up 2.5 percent in dollars to $8.8 million). Snowboard tops were up(14.8 percent in dollars to $5.2 million) while snowboard bottoms were down (1.1 percent in dollars to $3.0million). Women and junior snowboard apparel helped the category as a whole. Women (up 35.0 percent to$1.9 million) and junior (up 50.7 percent to $854,412) snowboard tops gained significantly. Also, women (up0.6 percent to $1.1 million) and junior (up 10.8 percent to $426,637) snowboard bottoms saw an up tick.

The Snowdecks/Skates Trend is Over

Equipment accessories were up 4.7 percent to $16.9 million. The big sellers during the August throughNovember time period were goggles (up 12.4 percent to $1.5 million) and sunglasses (up 26.1 percent to $6.1million). All other categories, including snowdecks/skates (down 39.8 percent to $126,284), auto racks (down20.5 percent to $2.0 million), snowshoes (down 3.1 percent to $525,587) and helmets (down 22.5 percent to$1.8 million) saw declines.

Apparel accessories came back to life in the month of November as consumers prepared for the coldweather. This category was up slightly 1.4 percent to $20.8 million. Almost all the categories saw increases:winter boots (up 65.2 percent to $1.6 million), gloves (up 0.8 percent to $3.5 million), base layer (up 2.8percent to $5.8 million), turtlenecks (up 22.0 percent to $480,702) and headwear (up 5.9 percent to $3.1million). Two categories saw declines, mitts (down 6.9 percent to $758,729) and socks (down 36.7 percent to$1.3 million). $368,067 which could be due to the increase in averageretail price from $39 last season to $74 this year. Chains store retailers have very little carry-over apparel tosell. This category declined 37.5 percent from last season. Carry-over accounted for 8 percent of all alpine topdollars sold, down from 12 percent last year.Alpine bottoms struggled even more, declining 18.5 percent in dollars to $7.2 million. The only bottomcategories to see any up tick were bibs (up 164.0 percent to $719,811), insulated waist pants (up 4.4 percentto $761,595) and softshell waist pants (up 126.9 percent to $73,265). All other alpine bottoms saw declines;shell waist pants (down 14.1 percent to $2.6 million), stretch waist pants (down 12.6 percent to $259,742),fleece waist pants (down 44.4 percent to $477,117) and juniors (down 24.8 percent to $962,807).

Snowboard apparel fared slightly better (up 2.5 percent in dollars to $8.8 million). Snowboard tops were up(14.8 percent in dollars to $5.2 million) while snowboard bottoms were down (1.1 percent in dollars to $3.0million). Women and junior snowboard apparel helped the category as a whole. Women (up 35.0 percent to$1.9 million) and junior (up 50.7 percent to $854,412) snowboard tops gained significantly. Also, women (up0.6 percent to $1.1 million) and junior (up 10.8 percent to $426,637) snowboard bottoms saw an up tick.

The Snowdecks/Skates Trend is Over

Equipment accessories were up 4.7 percent to $16.9 million. The big sellers during the August throughNovember time period were goggles (up 12.4 percent to $1.5 million) and sunglasses (up 26.1 percent to $6.1million). All other categories, including snowdecks/skates (down 39.8 percent to $126,284), auto racks (down20.5 percent to $2.0 million), snowshoes (down 3.1 percent to $525,587) and helmets (down 22.5 percent to$1.8 million) saw declines.

Apparel accessories came back to life in the month of November as consumers prepared for the coldweather. This category was up slightly 1.4 percent to $20.8 million. Almost all the categories saw increases:winter boots (up 65.2 percent to $1.6 million), gloves (up 0.8 percent to $3.5 million), base layer (up 2.8percent to $5.8 million), turtlenecks (up 22.0 percent to $480,702) and headwear (up 5.9 percent to $3.1million). Two categories saw declines, mitts (down 6.9 percent to $758,729) and socks (down 36.7 percent to$1.3 million).