Thanks to the Canadian Snowboard and Ski Council (actually Ski and Snowboard Council), there is a complete report available on the snowboard market up north. Taken from resorts across Canada, the surveys were designed by the Council and conducted at the participating areas. The results are done every winter annually and come from a sample size of 5,000 people or greater.

According to the Council, three percent of Canadians twelve years of age and older snowboard. This equals roughly 867,000 people. Of that amount, 37 percent (335,000 people) participate less than two times a month while 61 percent (532,000 people) are active snowboarders–those who board three or more times per month.

As expected, close to three-quarters (72 percent) of all Canadian snowboarders are between the ages of twelve to 24. The most active snowboarders (those who snowboard three or more times per month) are overwhelmingly aged twelve to seventeen (46 percent). Nine percent of Canadian snowboarders are between 35—49 years of age and make up six percent of active snowboarders.

According to the Council, snowboarders tend to be young, single, and male. Eighty percent of all snowboarders and 83 percent of active snowboarders are single, divorced, separated, or widowed. Twenty percent of all snowboarders and seventeen percent of active snowboarders are married or living together.

Males compromised 67 percent of all snowboarders and 70 percent of all active snowboarders.

As for the language of the Canadian snowboarder, 67 percent spoke English, 28 percent spoke French, and four percent spoke other languages.

Regionally, Quebec had both the highest percentage (30 percent or 263,000 people) of snowboarders, and the highest percent of active snowboarders with another 30 percent (167,000 people). Ontario had the second highest percentage with 27 percent (230,000 people) and 27 percent (143,000) of active snowboarders; followed by British Columbia with seventeen percent (146,000) and eighteen percent (98,000); Alberta with eleven percent (91,000) and nine percent (50,000); the Atlantic provinces with nine percent (79,000) and seven percent (39,000); and Manitoba/Saskatchewan with seven percent (58,000) and seven percent (36,000).

In terms of Canadian urban cities, Toronto had eleven percent (94,000) of all snowboarders and eleven percent (59,000) of all active snowboarders; Montreal had ten percent (85,000) and nine percent (47,000); and Vancouver seven percent (63,000) and seven percent (38,000).

Breaking down the percentages of snowboarders in population centers, 28 percent of all snowboarders and 27 percent of active snowboarders live in a community with a population greater than one- million, while 34 percent of all snowboarders and 32 percent of active snowboarders live in a community with a population between 100,000 and one million, and 38 percent of all snowboarders and 41 percent of active snowboarders live in communities with a population less than 100,000.

Thanks to the parents, 58 percent of all snowboarders and 61 percent of active snowboarders have household incomes over 50,000 dollars (Canadian), 70 percent of all snowboarders and 72 percent of active snowboarders own their own dwelling (as opposed to renting). Living at home has its advantages when 46 percent of active snowboarders are not employed, 28 percent are employed part time, and 26 percent of active snowboarders are employed full time.

For more specifics, the complete report is available from the Canadian Ski and Snowboard Council at a cost of 250 dollars. To order call Stephanie Ormerod at: (905) 212-9040; or e-mail: sormerod@skicanada.org.