Letters 14.7

We thought we’d make our lives easier while writing an intro this time around, so we have a little something to share with you from the outside of an envelope we received. Thanks to Jill Kelly from Delta, Canada, we now know: the first couple to be shown in bed together on prime-time TV was Fred and Wilma Flintstone. Tom Sawyer was the first novel to be written on a typewriter. Leonardo DaVinci invented the scissors. 60 Minutes is the only show on CBS without a theme song. Women invented bulletproof vests, fire escapes, windshield wipers, and laser printers. And if you were spelling out numbers chronologically from one up, you’d reach 1,000 before finding the letter “a.”

Anyway, Gretchen from Salt Lake City is going to be psyched to get back on the snow with her new Gnu board, Bent Metal bindings, and Northwave boots. And Robert Pepper will be an even cooler dad when his kids find out he won a Type A board, Sno Pro bindings, and DC boots. Congrats!

Waiting In Pain
It was a sunny day at the end of January and I was enjoying the fresh (but unusually heavy) foot of Utah powder in Snowbird’s Mineral Basin area. A friend and I were traversing out to the chutes when I collided with a skier. He came off a higher traverse, down around a clump of trees, and hit me square on. By the time he saw me, there was no way he could’ve stopped regardless of how good he was or what was strapped to his feet. We went straight down and immediately I felt a sharp pain in my front leg. I was screaming frantically at my friend to get this guy off me when I looked at his face. His entire face was bloody from the nose down, his eyes were rolled back into his head, and he was unconscious and convulsing. I thought I’d killed him, and if I had a helmet on, I probably would’ve. Luckily, both his friend and mine had EMT training. His friend rolled him off me and kept him talking, although he could barely form words when he first woke up. I had my friend unstrap my right binding, and when my foot just flopped out, I knew my femur was broken. It only took ski patrol about ten minutes to get there, which was pretty good considering we weren’t exactly on a marked trail. They took care of the skier first, which was a priority because of his head injury, then they got me stabilized (in traction) and down to the clinic. The patrollers were very kind and efficient-I have a new-found and utmost respect for those guys. They called me a “tough chick,” but I know I screamed most of the way to the hospital-at least until the doctor gave me morphine. They put a metal rod down the center of my bone and discharged me from the hospital in two days with no cast or anything. I’ve spent the last few weeks recuperating (reading TransWorld, swimming, and such) and looking to the east from my home at the accumulating snow in the Wasatch. I think about the accident and wonder what happened to the skier who I only know as Colby. I hope he’s okay. All in all, I figure I’ve been on the snow 23 of my 26 years of life (thirteen on a board) and loved almost every minute of it. Odds are in that many years shit will happen, and it did. Yeah, I got hurt right before the season got good, but all I can do now is keep a good attitude, heal, and think about next season. Too bad Snowbird won’t refund any part of my pass, though-I could use the cash to pay some doctor bills.
Gretchen Pernichele
Salt Lake City, Utah
You’ve got the right attitude. Everything in life doesn’t always go according to plan, but you’ve got to roll with the punches and move on. Obviously we can’t give you cash, but we can hook you up with a Gnu board, Bent Metal bindings, and Northwave boots as inspiration to heal for next season-and we wish you a speedy recovery!

One Hip Dad
I wanted to share this with you. I’m 41 and a father of three wonderful children: Chris (sixteen), Josh (fifteen), and Jackie (seven). Last winter, instead of fixing sandwiches in the day lodge, I decided to go snowboardin For eight hours I head-butted snow, kissed snow, ate snow, and ultimately fell in love with the snow. Learning how to snowboard outweighed the pain. As the season went on, I tried other chairs and actually started seeing my kids on the hill. Soon we were on the chairs together, riding, waiting for each other, trying out jumps, laughing and yelling, looking at gear on e-bay, adjusting bindings, and wishing it would snow … together! From the gravel pits to North Face, it thrills me to spend time with my kids in such a positive way-guess you could say I’m “stoked.” Thanks for the inspiration that comes with each issue!
Robert Pepper
thepeppers@gci.net
Sounds like great quality time you’re having with your kids, which is hard to come by. And what better way than hanging together outside in the fresh air, getting exercise, and having fun. So because you’re such an awesome dad, we’re giving you a Type A snowboard, Sno Pro bindings, and DC boots. Enjoy!

Image: Does It Really Matter?
How’s it going, TransWorld? My name is Will, I live in Utah, and I’ve been boarding for five years. This is how it goes recently: I purchased a new pair of boots, specifically the new J.P. Walker pro model by Forum. Here is where things get screwed up: since buying these boots, I’ve been criticized by people for “being trendy.” What’s sad is that I knew this was going to happen before I even bought the damn boots. I almost didn’t buy them just so I wouldn’t have to listen to the bullshit, but I thought the boots were kick-ass, so I said screw what people think, I want performance gear. Now all I hear is, “Sellout,” and “Hey there, trendy.” I think you get the picture. I guess Forum is the Tommy Hilfiger of the snowboard world. This is really starting to piss me off! Snowboarders are becoming more worried about image instead of the love of the sport. Yeah, I know no one wants to be or look like someone else and we all want to look good, but hey, we all want quality gear, so why should we be criticized for it? I think some boarders need to take a step back and start looking at how they’re riding rather than being concerned about what someone’s wearing. Forget the trends and concentrate on the enjoyment of this totally awesome sport. Thanks for letting me vent.
Will Swick
Ogden, Utah
Don’t let it get to you. You know you made your purchases for the right reasons, so to hell with what anyone else has to say about it.

A Good Deed A Day Keeps Bad Karma Away
I’m writing to thank you for publishing the article on the Snowrider Project in your October issue. I feel pollution of the slopes is a very serious issue, which for me, hits close to home. For two years now I’ve been riding the same backcountry spot. Unfortunately, the hill has become quite popular with the riders in my town. With so many people riding it, the hill tends to get covered in beer cans, cigarette butts, and other assorted garbage. So every day after everyone has gone home, I go around the hill and pick up the garbage. Sometimes other riders tease me, but for the most part they respect what I’m doing even though they never help. People might wonder why I bother to clean up everyone’s mess. My reason is simple: Everyone who rides my spot should be able to experience the same unspoiled beauty I did on my first day there. They shouldn’t have to suffer because some people think snowboarding’s a right rather than a privilege and don’t give a thought to what might happen to it in the future if people continue to pollute the snow.
John Kelsall
Via e-mail
Keep up the good work! Although people may give you shit, you’re setting a good example and most likely rubbing off on them in a positive way.

A Painful Way To End The Day
Every ripper has a story of a time when they’ve been injured while snowboarding. Here’s mine: My buddy and I were at Sun Peaks near Kamloops, B.C., where we were hung up in some dense trees. It was our last run of the trip and we were both pretty spent. We stopped to pick a nice line out when I noticed a sweet-looking tree stump covered in snow a little ways down. I was stoked and decided to hit it. I was a little nervous because of all the trees around, but I managed to stomp a modest yet beautiful 180 grab. I turned back to my bud and told him to give ‘er a try, and when I turned back, I realized I was heading straight for a tree. I’ve never felt so dumb in my life. It was too late to avoid it, so I turned to try to stop. My board smoked the tree boardslide style and the force of the contact bent my knees in. A branch was sticking out and it got me-bad. You know that real fleshy spot directly above your pride and joy? Oh yeah, that’s the spot. It stuck me right there. I screamed like a little schoolgirl. I thought I’d been impaled and that I was going to die right then and there on the mountain. Upon further inspection, I realized the branch hadn’t even punctured the skin. However, my abdomen was purple and swollen for two weeks. It hurt so bad just to piss. Every time I left the john, people would be staring at me, probably due to all the painful moans and cries of agony coming from my stall. Not only did that little accident damage my body, it damaged my pride as well.
Wade Reves
Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, Canada
Well Wade, you seem all right and your pride should recover. You’re just lucky your joy didn’t get more injured!

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns(tm)) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Road, Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. and we were both pretty spent. We stopped to pick a nice line out when I noticed a sweet-looking tree stump covered in snow a little ways down. I was stoked and decided to hit it. I was a little nervous because of all the trees around, but I managed to stomp a modest yet beautiful 180 grab. I turned back to my bud and told him to give ‘er a try, and when I turned back, I realized I was heading straight for a tree. I’ve never felt so dumb in my life. It was too late to avoid it, so I turned to try to stop. My board smoked the tree boardslide style and the force of the contact bent my knees in. A branch was sticking out and it got me-bad. You know that real fleshy spot directly above your pride and joy? Oh yeah, that’s the spot. It stuck me right there. I screamed like a little schoolgirl. I thought I’d been impaled and that I was going to die right then and there on the mountain. Upon further inspection, I realized the branch hadn’t even punctured the skin. However, my abdomen was purple and swollen for two weeks. It hurt so bad just to piss. Every time I left the john, people would be staring at me, probably due to all the painful moans and cries of agony coming from my stall. Not only did that little accident damage my body, it damaged my pride as well.
Wade Reves
Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, Canada
Well Wade, you seem all right and your pride should recover. You’re just lucky your joy didn’t get more injured!

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns(tm)) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Road, Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com.