Letters 14.6

The season is now in full swing for everyone … hope you’re all getting plenty of sick lines and fresh pow! We’re finally out of the office, too, and on the road getting all the amazing photos and stories for next year. But don’t worry, even though we’re no longer sitting in our cubicles, the magic of magazine making will have the last two issues at your house in no time. In the meantime, hooray for winter! And snowboarding! And traveling! And here’s something to keep in mind: we want to hear about your favorite snowboarding experience of this season, so in the September 2001 issue, we’ll print as many of the best letters that we can fit in the column. Sound good? For this issue, our letter winners are Brian from Alberta, Canada, who’s getting hooked up with an Option board, Nidecker bindings, and Airwalk boots, and Serena from Oregon, who will receive an entire setup from Nitro. So you best start having some incredible snowboarding adventures, because you could be the next letter winner. Good luck!

I’ve Got A Peaceful, Easy Feeling
I’m a seventeen-year-old guy who’s been snowboarding for about six years. I’ve put up with a lot of crap from other boarders before, but last season tops it! I was at Canada Olympic Park in Calgary, Alberta with a couple of buddies. We’d been hitting this one tabletop all day and getting some sweet air. But, being the dorks that we are, we kept raising the bar. It was my turn, and I had to do a backside 540 nose to tail. With what I thought would be enough speed to clear the table, I went for it. Somehow I ended up catching my tail on the lip of the jump at the start of my rotation, and needless to say, I was laid out on my back fairly quickly.

Moaning and groaning in agony on top of the table, I tried to get up, but realized I couldn’t move. Just then some great big guy started yelling at me, “Get off the f-king jump, a-hole!” and so on and so forth. I was trying to tell him I couldn’t move, but he started to approach me-yeah, I was a little bit worried. Just in time, my buddies rode up and got him out of there. As the stretcher took me to the lodge, the guy rode by and said, “You got lucky, muthaf-ka!”

I would just like to say that I can’t believe such an awesome sport is being turned into a fight club. I’ve seen more fights on the mountain than I have on the street. People need to chill out on the hill and enjoy life rather than making others miserable. And most of all, respect your fellow snowboarders’ ability to make mistakes.
Brian Fehr
Dalemead, Alberta, Canada

Right on, Brian! No one should be fighting on the hill … what are people thinking? Relax, take a load off, enjoy the day, and most of all, have fun. What’s the reasoning behind ruining someone else’s day, anyway? It couldn’t possibly make you feel better about yourself! For bringing this important issue to the attention of thousands of readers, you are about to receive an Option board, Nidecker bindings, and Airwalk boots. Keep spreading the word!

Keepin’ It Cool And Calm
My best friend and I stayed at a cabin in the mountains for her birthday at the end of last season. We’d been hitting jumps like mad, and I asked her to watch one I’d been practicing on all day. I decided not to impress her with a tailgrab or anything special. Instead, I just sailed over and felt comfortable with the air I got, but I noticed I wasn’t really in position to make an award-winning landing. Actually, the tip of my board was pointed a little too downward, and I didn’t have time to correct it, so I was flung directly onto my right shoulder. I knew there was something seriously wrong when I went completely numb from my neck to my toes on my right side.

The beginning of this season rolled around quick, and I was all ready to go out on the slopes again. My brother decided to take me to Utah with him, but the conditions weren’t very good. Once again, I took a blow to the shoulder, and this time my parents insisted thaI go to the doctor. So I did, and he told me I probably needed surgery-they were going to take an MRI. When those words came out of the doctor’s mouth, I felt like my life was being flushed down the toilet. My favorite boarding partner was also devastated by the thought of me not being able to board for the rest of the season.

Later that night, she came over to my house and brought me your magazine. She told me there was still hope, to stick it out, and I’d be back before I knew it. So I did what she said, and finally the time came when the doctor went over the MRI results and told me what my options were. It turned out I had torn my rotator cuff and bruised some soft tissue. I had the option of surgery or physical therapy. I chose physical therapy, and in two more weeks I should be ready to hit the slopes again if everything goes as planned.

While I’ve been injured and not able to board, I still go up to the mountain and hike to photograph my friends. I always find myself feeling right at home sittin’ in the snow with boarders all around me and reading TransWorld SNOWboarding. Your magazine has given me the hope of one day, very soon, boarding again.
Serena Flanders
Seal Rock, Oregon

By now you should be back on your board again, tearin’ up the mountain like there’s no tomorrow. At least we hope so, because otherwise you won’t be able to put your new Nitro gear to use until who knows when. Enjoy!

A Shoutout To The Ladies
I would like to thank Anne Molin-Kongsgaard for her quote, “Maybe this could be a little reminder for girls out there to step it up; it’s worth going snowboarding and it’s a lot of fun.” TWS October 2000, Arctic Challenge. I’m so glad females are snowboarding and succeeding at a sport that has traditionally been so male-dominated. It’s great to see more women out there-keep with it!

I do have a complaint, however, to the snow bunnies on the mountain: Why are you there? These are the girls who are on the slopes in large numbers, giggling, stopping the chairlift every time, and thinking it’s so funny. It’s annoying! My advice: get off the mountain and go to the mall!
Lyndsey Zolzman
Vancouver, British Columbia

With All, Do Respect
I’d just like to thank you for the interview with Jason Murphy October 2000. I’m a member of the Mormon religion as well, and really admire you guys for the respect given to the church and people of Utah. I’ve read other snowboarding mags with articles about Utah and Mormons, and they give the impression that Utah’s a perfect place to go if you want to party, drink, and smoke, even though most of the people don’t. Thanks for not doing that.
Jake Olsen
Jackson, Montana

The Dreamer
Sitting, staring, wishing, gazing.
The dreamer peers out the window upon the crisp autumn night.
The star-studded sky tells the future as visions of the mountains, fresh powder, and the parks dance across the frost-covered fields.
Soon come the days of carefree fun.
The tricks, the laughter, the stories of “the big one you almost landed.”
The mountains whisper yet louder each morning.
Reminders of the perfect powder day play back.
Flying down the mountain, the frigid air stings the mind.
The stars show the visions of these days to come, yet these days will all too soon melt away and once again leave us with the dreamer.
Sitting, staring, wishing, gazing …
Elizabeth Thompson
West Lafayette, Indiana

Something To Think About
On January 22, my two friends and I were driving home from a long day of pipe riding. We live in Minnesota where the riding and pipes aren’t so great, but we make the best of it and always have fun. While driving, all of a sudden we heard a bump on top of the car. We pulled onto the side of the freeway to see what happened, and my board was no longer there. I was freaking out, so we decided to take the next exit to turn around and retrace our route. I put on my brights and then saw my board in the middle of the freeway. We pulled over and a brave friend of mine ran all the way across the freeway to get it. My Jeff Brushie board was cracked in half, and my brand-new Ride LX bindings that I’d purchased five days before were all bent and no longer usable. I loved that board more than anything-it was probably the best one I’ve ever had. This was a real eye-opener, so if you’re having someone put your board on the car, always double check to make sure it’s secure. Don’t let this happen to you! Shane Stalling
Apple Valley, Minnesota

That sucks, man! At least no one was injured, though. We knew someone who once had a surfboard fly off his car and go straight into the windshield of the car behind him-it was pretty bad.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns(tm)) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Road, Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com.ts and then saw my board in the middle of the freeway. We pulled over and a brave friend of mine ran all the way across the freeway to get it. My Jeff Brushie board was cracked in half, and my brand-new Ride LX bindings that I’d purchased five days before were all bent and no longer usable. I loved that board more than anything-it was probably the best one I’ve ever had. This was a real eye-opener, so if you’re having someone put your board on the car, always double check to make sure it’s secure. Don’t let this happen to you! Shane Stalling
Apple Valley, Minnesota

That sucks, man! At least no one was injured, though. We knew someone who once had a surfboard fly off his car and go straight into the windshield of the car behind him-it was pretty bad.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns(tm)) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Road, Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com.