Letters 14.5

Wow … another year gone by. How time flies when you’re sitting in a cubicle reading letters day in and day out! We were talking around here the other day about how the older you get, the quicker the years seem to pass by, and we came up with a theory. When you’re ten, a year is one-tenth of your life, which is pretty significant. But when you’re 25, a year is one twenty-fifth of your life-a much smaller amount. So although a year still is and will always be 365 days long, the older you get, the less time that is in the whole scheme of things. Interesting, huh? Yeah, right. All you probably care about is whether or not your letter was printed in here.

All right then, this month our letter winners are Micah from South Berwick, Maine, and Erika from London, Ontario. Micah will be kickin’ ass on his new World board with Switch bindings and Vans boots. And Erika will be stylin’ on her new Morrow board with Santa Cruz bindings, wearing a pair of Thirty-two boots. Congratulations you two, and keep up the good writing, everyone!

Surprise, Surprise
At the end of last season, I went to our local mountain with some of my friends. The spring conditions were as good as could be expected, except for a few bare spots. We went straight to the top and rode down the easier trails first to check it out. After four runs, it started to rain. The snow turned to slush, and the mountain closed for about an hour because of lightning.

We all hung out in the lodge, and when the mountain opened again, we went right back to the top. We went down the same trail we had been rippin’ before, and I went over a small hill to catch air. I was about midway in my flight when I realized I was headed for a huge bare spot. And it wasn’t until I landed on it that I found out it was actually a giant rock. I ended up totaling my 2000 Zeppelin that I’d saved up to buy for 420 dollars. I’m fourteen, so that’s a lot of money to me. I also ripped my coat and cracked my goggles. I was really worked.

Luckily I was wearing a helmet, though, so my only injuries were some hurt ribs, a hurt wrist, bumps, and bruises. Even though my board, coat, and goggles were ruined, the first thing I thought was, “What would’ve happened if I wasn’t wearing a helmet?” So for all you people out there who think you’re too cool for a helmet, you’re wrong.
Micah Harford
South Berwick, Maine

Unexpected occurrences like this happen all the time, and unless prepared, you could be the next veg-head at your local mental facility. We’re glad to hear you’re okay, Micah, and it’s great that you were more concerned about your physical wellbeing than the destruction of your equipment-especially because you’re going to receive a new World board, Switch bindings, and Vans boots to replace your old setup and broken board. And while on the subject of helmets, take a look at the product column this month to find out what’s on the market. Also, Dr. George’s column is on head injuries-it’s one you shouldn’t miss.

To Each His (Or Her) Own
Ever since I started snowboarding two years ago, I’ve been completely in love with it. It’s all that I think and dream about, and as soon as I’m done with high school, I’m moving my ass out to Whistler, B.C. where I can become a pro and hopefully get sponsored by Burton. Snowboarding hasn’t been easy, and after suffering numerous injuries like broken arms and fingers, I almost lost the courage to keep going. TW SNOW has really inspired me, though. I eventually conquered my fears and am now boarding better than ever.

Whenever I hit the park and pull tricks, other girls look at me like I’m crazy and think only guys are supposed to be the best snowboarders. That’s bullshit. Also, because I’m one of the only people at my local hill who always wears a helmet, other boarders often yell and harass me, calling me a girly-ass wimp and other shit like that. But regardless of what people think, I will always wear my helmet-it has saved my head so ma times!

About two months ago, this little grom came up to me and said, “Hey, you’re the best girl rider I’ve ever seen!” I was totally stoked-I couldn’t believe it! It’s kids like that who keep snowboarding pure and fun. Well TW SNOW, thank you so much for keeping the sport real and always inspiring me to ride my hardest. And never forget: snowboarding is life-the rest is just details.
Erika Pliniussen-Koziol
London, Ontario, Canada

In keeping with our helmet theme of this issue, you are the chosen female letter winner. You will receive a Morrow board, Santa Cruz bindings, and a pair of Thirty-two boots for your most important message regarding wearing helmets and not caring what other people may say about it. Great job, and stay strong!

Proud Helmet Owner
This is to that wanna-be who wrote to you in the January 2000 issue last year complaining about helmets. For his sake, I will drop down to his maturity/intelligence level and use his vocabulary for a bit to enlighten him why “dorks” like myself wear “lame” helmets and other “nerdy” safety gear.

I often drift back to the days when I too was an immature “butt monkey” who thought someone else was a “sissy” because they wore a “stupid” helmet-the days when I was a virgin to concussions, broken limbs, and sprained joints. I didn’t get my injuries because I “sucked,” I got them from being cool and doing some “phat” tricks off some “sick” jump when the conditions were shitty. I was no “sissy,” I was a “burly” boarder, and if I was dared to do it, I f-kin’ did it.

My first concussion was minor. I didn’t really give a rat’s ass, or rather didn’t know that my brain was swelling inside my skull. I was just “stoked” to finally have an injury I could brag about. My next head-smashing incident wasn’t so funny. It scares the piss out of you when you start forgetting simple shit like your best friend’s name or what number comes after four. I never told my parents for the fear that they would put an end to my snowboarding season.

Twelve Tylenols later, I found myself in the brain-bucket section of my local sports store and forked over 90 one-dollar bills of my own money for something that would for sure only bring me verbal abuse and laughter from my fellow boarders. I had taken a stand for what I believed in, and although they wouldn’t eat lunch with me in the lodge anymore, they respected my choice and refrained from cracking any “salad bowl” jokes while I was around.

I pity you for wasting your time writing about how stupid helmets are: they f-king save lives. How in the hell is that stupid? That’s like saying air bags suck and only “dorks” wear seat belts. If you don’t want to wear a helmet, that’s fine, but have some respect for those who do. They’re the ones who’ll be haulin’ ass down the mountain to get the ski patrol after you grinded a fat-ass pine tree with your head.
Oly Mingo
Entiat, Washington
Nice comeback!

Lesson Learned The Hard Way
The day after Boxing Day December 26 I was snowboarding up at Cypress. It was extremely packed-all the parking lots were full, and every liftline was huge. So after about three hours (of more waiting in line than boarding), I decided to go down for lunch. My friends and I all put our boards down on the racks (my first mistake), then we went to the cafeteria to find a seat (turning my back on my board: my second mistake).

It was maybe 30 seconds at the most when I went to check on my board-and it was gone. Immediately I began to panic, running around to see if I misplaced it. No, that wasn’t it. I ran up to the mountain security people and told them what happened. The guy then tells me to go and report it, but since it just happened a few minutes ago, the person should still be around somewhere. So about ten other guys and I run around the parking lots looking for my board. It turned out two other guys were doing the same thing: looking for someone who stole their boards as well! They said it was around the same time as when my board was stolen, so maybe there were a couple of guys working at the same time. Also, some person said they thought they saw some suspicious-looking guys in dress clothes, which pisses me off to think that some assholes came up to the mountain just to jack snowboards.

Well, after like two hours of desperately searching, everyone gave up. The guys and I filled out some reports, and I waited for my ride to show. There’s obviously a lesson to be learned here: one is use a f-king lock, and the other is anyone who goes up to a mountain just to steal people’s boards is an asshole. But the long and short of it is this: don’t make the same mistake I did. Make sure to lock up your board no matter how long you’re leaving it-it’s just not worth losing it. Well, on that note, keep up the good work because I’m going to be doing a lot of reading this season.
Mark Hall-Patch
Vancouver, British Columbia

It’s unfortunate how many letters we get about boards being stolen. If you don’t want your board to get ripped off, you have options. One is to keep it with you at all times, but that’s not always possible or convenient. Another is pay the couple bucks to check it into one of those security counters-it’s better than later spending 400 dollars on a new board. Or you could just buy a board lock for fifteen to twenty dollars and take that extra minute to make it more difficult for someone to steal your board.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns(tm)) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Road, Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. said it was around the same time as when my board was stolen, so maybe there were a couple of guys working at the same time. Also, some person said they thought they saw some suspicious-looking guys in dress clothes, which pisses me off to think that some assholes came up to the mountain just to jack snowboards.

Well, after like two hours of desperately searching, everyone gave up. The guys and I filled out some reports, and I waited for my ride to show. There’s obviously a lesson to be learned here: one is use a f-king lock, and the other is anyone who goes up to a mountain just to steal people’s boards is an asshole. But the long and short of it is this: don’t make the same mistake I did. Make sure to lock up your board no matter how long you’re leaving it-it’s just not worth losing it. Well, on that note, keep up the good work because I’m going to be doing a lot of reading this season.
Mark Hall-Patch
Vancouver, British Columbia

It’s unfortunate how many letters we get about boards being stolen. If you don’t want your board to get ripped off, you have options. One is to keep it with you at all times, but that’s not always possible or convenient. Another is pay the couple bucks to check it into one of those security counters-it’s better than later spending 400 dollars on a new board. Or you could just buy a board lock for fifteen to twenty dollars and take that extra minute to make it more difficult for someone to steal your board.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns(tm)) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Road, Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com.