Letters 14.2

The best thing about getting mail–not junk mail–is the anticipation of who it’s from and what it’s going to say. Although communication technology has come a long way, we still love getting actual letters (i.e., “snail mail”) in the mailbox the most. (That doesn’t mean we don’t read the cyber-letters or e-mails, though.) A tangible letter just seems to convey much more personality and creativity–someone’s handwriting or the font they use, the paper and color ink they choose, their little doodles and drawings, et cetera, say a lot about them. So keep sending us your fascinating snowboarding stories, and keep in mind–there’s nothing worse than not being able to read what a letter says because of crappy handwriting.

This month we’re rewarding Nate Nagatani with a setup from Salomon and Twist, and Molly Katchpole’s getting hooked up with gear from Ride and DC. You could be next!

The Miseducation Of Snowboarders

I want to talk about the attitude we as snowboarders carry on the mountain. I recently went on a trip to Heavenly. As I rode down the mountain, I came upon a lot of little kids–which is the greatest thing in the world to see. I don’t care if they are skiing or snowboarding, my concern is all the small children I witnessed being cut off by guys my age snowboarding.

I saw one guy come off a spine, fall in front of a four-year-old girl, and wipe her out. Then he just checked himself out and kept going. I stopped to make sure she was okay, and then went on my way. Later I talked with her mom, who came up to thank me. She told me that all day she’d been basically shielding her daughter from guys bombing past her. And while I’m all for bombing a hill with total disregard for my own safety, I don’t think we should do it with disregard for others’ safety.

As it is, we as snowboarders have a bad image. People see us as smart-ass punks who are a bunch of losers. We know we don’t have to be punks to snowboard, but I see plenty of kids go to the mountains and try to act tough before they even strap on a board. Snowboarding’s not an image–it’s a passion. I just want everyone to stop and think about the people around them when they ride. Instead of laughing at someone’s misfortune, take ten seconds out of your life to help them out. Love every second of your day, and never forget that one incident within your great day can make someone else’s bad. It can instantly turn someone off the sport we love so much.

Nate Nagatani

Via Internet

Your genuine concern regarding the future generation is commendable. For demonstrating such maturity on the mountain, we would like to reward you with a pair of Twist boots, and a Salomon board and bindings.

Twirps

Hey! I’m writing to say how much you’ve inspired me to keep snowboarding. I’ve been teased by boys in my grade–they think girls can’t snowboard. When I walk by them in the hall, they snicker. I might not be the best snowboarder, but I only started last December. I can’t practice much because of where I live. But TransWorld SNOWboarding has kept me going with all the girls in it. Thank you so much. Keep up the great work, and don’t change at all.

Molly Katchpole

Cumberland, Rhode Island

Thanks, Molly. We’ll do our best to continue with the female coverage. Just keep riding as much as possible, and once you receive your new Ride board and bindings and DC boots from us, we’re sure those snickering little brats will shut the hell up.

From One Extreme To Another

This world is a scary place–without snow! For the last eighteen years of my life I’ve lived in Alaska. After graduating high school I was suddenly faced with the fact that I had to leave this wonderful snow-filled place for collegeAnd where did I go? Phoenix, the friggin’ desert. What the hell was I thinking? My entire high school career I was told college is where my life would begin, so why does it feel like it has just ended? There are people here who’ve never even seen snow. If you think that’s bad, come watch everyone put on coats ’cause it’s a brisk 65 degrees outside. Everyone thought my friends were losers for staying home.

Craig Luchinetti

Glendale, Arizona

We’re curious what made you choose Arizona of all places. But other than that, you’ll adjust soon enough to college life whether you remain in Arizona or transfer somewhere else (hint, hint). Your friends may not be losers for choosing to stay home, but we can vouch that the college years are some of the best in life–and when they’re spent away from home, it can be even more rewarding.

Itchy And Scratchy

My lame campus job finally paid off. The last thing in 1999 and the first thing in 2000 I did was ride Utah powder. It was the perfect way to welcome my tenth season and celebrate the fact I’ve been snowboarding for half my life.

I then returned to the Bronx to start another semester, when something happened in New York City that hasn’t happened in the two years since I relocated here from New England–it dumped. Itching, I grabbed Old Faithful and headed for the park at 231 Street and Riverdale Avenue. I’d been waiting for this day ever since I first scouted out the little hill two years ago.

I found an empty trash can and board-shoveled that puppy full of snow a good ten times, sculpting the resulting pile into a nice big hit. I then had a gnarly three-hour solo session that lasted until the local grammar schools let out for the day. About 80 little kids came armed with garbage-can-lid sleds and had the ultimate session. The poor jump gave out under the pressure, but those little kids loved it while it lasted. And it was all good with me; my itch had been scratched.

Brian Cooper

Bronx, New York

A day, and a storm, to remember. Did you see last month’s feature, “East Coast Jib Fest”? It was apparently a good time to be on the East Coast.

Coma Toast

Last season I wasn’t able to make it up to the hill due to a coma. A year ago, on September 20, I was on my way to school and got in an accident that put me in a coma for the better part of the season. Because of all that happened, I’ve been forced to read your mag for once, instead of just looking at all the pictures. SNOWboarding has been my only link to the snow. You guys have really helped me pass the time over the last year. I was wondering what might help me get back on the slopes now.

Guy Graham

Squaw Valley, California

Yeah, we can sort of relate to the coma factor after sitting in an office all season long. However, we’re not professionals in a position to give you advice on getting back into shape–you should probably find a physical therapist for that. But we do suppose it would be good to try something gentle at first, such as yoga combined with some strength training, to get your body moving and your blood flowing again. On top of that, you’ll have to slowly reacquaint yourself with your board and the mountain. Good luck!

Dear Snowboarders

You guys are good on the halfpipe. Do your snowboards ever break when you’re grinding a pole? If your snowboard breaks, do you get a free snowboard?

I have a snowboard. It’s a Ride. I also have Burton boots and a Bonfire coat. I want to get a Burton snowboard and go to Beartown Ski Area. I want to go on a halfpipe. Please write back.

Josh Baker

Plattsburgh, New York

Josh, thanks for the compliment. Unfortunately, we’re not as good as some in the pipe–hence the desk jobs. None of us have ever broken a board while “grinding a pole.” In fact, we’ve never heard of anyone doing that. If yours or anyone else’s board did break, and it was because of a manufacturing defect rather than misuse, the company that made the board (not the shop that sold it) should repair or replace it.

Dream On

I’m writing to congratulate you on a flawless magazine. Time after time you guys amaze me with your ability to put together such an excellent magazine. For instance, on days when I roll out of bed around 11:30 a.m., I don’t really feel like doing anything. But when I start flipping through your latest edition at the breakfast table, I always feel like a day in the backcountry. It’s inspiring to see the full-blown photos and think to myself, “Hey, that could be me someday.”

I’m seventeen and have been snowboarding and skateboarding for four years now. Part of my conundrum is that I’m isolated in a very rural area with little if any places to get a thrill from the sport of snowboarding. As I read your magazine, I dream of someday leaving this hick town and venturing off to a place like Whistler or Cypress. I want to thank you guys for keeping my fictitious dream alive.

Jamie Hovey

Carlow, Canada

You’re welcome. Dreams are what you make of them. If you stay motivated and active, you can be as good as those who are in the mag. All it takes is a little dedication and hard work.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns¿) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. Or, for those of you who are beyond the rest of us and have access to the World Wide Web, you can post cyber-letters on transworldsnowboarding.com. grinding a pole.” In fact, we’ve never heard of anyone doing that. If yours or anyone else’s board did break, and it was because of a manufacturing defect rather than misuse, the company that made the board (not the shop that sold it) should repair or replace it.

Dream On

I’m writing to congratulate you on a flawless magazine. Time after time you guys amaze me with your ability to put together such an excellent magazine. For instance, on days when I roll out of bed around 11:30 a.m., I don’t really feel like doing anything. But when I start flipping through your latest edition at the breakfast table, I always feel like a day in the backcountry. It’s inspiring to see the full-blown photos and think to myself, “Hey, that could be me someday.”

I’m seventeen and have been snowboarding and skateboarding for four years now. Part of my conundrum is that I’m isolated in a very rural area with little if any places to get a thrill from the sport of snowboarding. As I read your magazine, I dream of someday leaving this hick town and venturing off to a place like Whistler or Cypress. I want to thank you guys for keeping my fictitious dream alive.

Jamie Hovey

Carlow, Canada

You’re welcome. Dreams are what you make of them. If you stay motivated and active, you can be as good as those who are in the mag. All it takes is a little dedication and hard work.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns¿) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. Or, for those of you who are beyond the rest of us and have access to the World Wide Web, you can post cyber-letters on transworldsnowboarding.com.