Letters 14.1

Welcome back, readers! We hope you had a fantastic off-season, and we’re sure you must be ready for some new photos to endlessly worship and drool over. To start this volume off on the right foot, we’re rewarding Angela from Quesnel, B.C. with a setup from K2–board, boots, and bindings–for basically reading our minds. Also, Seth from Jackson Hole is getting hooked up with a Never Summer board and Burton boots and bindings for his enlightening poem of what’s to come our way in just a couple more months. As you can see, our theme this year is feet. All of our letter winners will receive a board, boots, and bindings, so what better way to take advantage of your story telling and writing skills?

Straight From The Heart

Month after month I pick up a copy of TransWorld SNOWboarding and read it from cover to cover. I love this magazine almost as much as I love riding, but one thing I don’t love is the attitude of some of the people who write in–namely those whining, sniveling, ski-hating, Pampers-wearing, ungrateful spoiled brats who got into this sport for all the wrong reasons in the first place. You want a snowboard? Work your ass off like the rest of us! Not only will you get your board, you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment. I spent a year hairdressing by day and working fast food by night to buy my gear.

Another thing that really bugs me are the riders who complain about the ads in this magazine. They preach about selling out and all this other crap, while they’re the ones riding a board with a big logo, wearing the jackets and T-shirts, and driving vehicles with symbols all over them. Hypocrites! There’s nothing wrong with a little advertising, and snowboarding is what you make it. Let’s see all of you losers write and publish a successful snowboarding mag without advertising. I love this magazine!

Angela Dunn

Quesnel, B.C.

Word. We couldn’t have said it better!

Off Season

Clouds of steam escape my lips,

Frozen fingers ache to grip,

Waiting for that winter trip,

A dusty white salvation.

Tried to stare right through the clouds,

Hear the mountain speak out loud,

This dead end job don’t make me proud,

So I turn my eyes back downward.

When the storm had stopped to breathe,

I looked up at the snow and trees,

It nearly brought me to my knees,

That window to salvation.

In my car escape the rain,

Warmer at the bowling lane,

Crack another beer again,

And toast to looking forward.

When the ground is soft and white,

I’ll ride into the eyes of fright,

And sleep so soundly every night,

My mind no longer restless.

I’m longing for that peace of mind,

For Mother Nature to be kind,

For powder shots to make me blind,

To life down in the valley.

The board below me glides and flows,

Through every morning’s untouched snows,

I’m living life the way I choose,

Who else could choose my path?

This autumn snow now makes it seem,

That summertime was but a dream,

I’m walking to the sunrise gleam,

The dawning of the winter.

Seth Larsen

Jackson, Wyoming

Our poetry does not compare,

Your ability is so rare,

It’s nice to hear how much you care,

And jones to get out there.

 

To your feelings we all relate,

And deep down we know it’s fate,

For you to win gear that is first rate,

Which we’re sure you won’t hate.

Planning Ahead

I’m not sure if this is a customary manner of requesting such information, but please forgive the fact that I am a naive freshman in college. My name is Matt Kolbeck and I am continuing my higher education at the renowned University of California at Santa Cruz. Being in college now in the pursuit of life, happiness, and a great job, I was wondering what the chances are of working for aagazine like TransWorld SNOWboarding.

I’ve been snowboarding for the past six years all over the U.S., just like the five-million other people in my age group, so I am familiar with the lifestyle. I’ve also been into writing and journalism throughout high school, and also just whenever I can pick up a pen and a piece of paper. I would be really thankful if your staff could provide any information on how to get on the right track for working with a snowboarding magazine, such as the requirements and prerequisites. Anything would be just great. Or, if you decide to laugh and crumple this letter into a little ball, that’s fine too because I’ll still snowboard, read the magazines, and know I at least attempted one of the best jobs this world has to offer.

Snowboarding has no words worthy of description. It’s one of those places in life where people, customs, and environment come together with such harmony. In college I’ve realized thus far that a lot of the real world likes to deny this element of life, and that’s bullshit. Maybe I’m crazy, but that’s okay. It comes with the territory and I know that whoever puts this magazine together knows what I’m talking about and will hopefully understand. Anyway, any information that TransWorld could give me would help me out a lot in my plans for the future.

Matt Kolbeck

Aptos, California

It sounds like you’re headed in the right direction for an editorial position. It definitely helps that you’ve been snowboarding for years and have writing experience, so all I can really say is keep it up. There are no set requirements or prerequisites for the positions here, but a college education will certainly help. When I was hired for the position of editorial assistant they were looking for someone with good knowledge of snowboarding and of the English language, as well as the fundamental grammar and punctuation skills to be able to edit and write. I got my degree in communication, which definitely included all of this, although journalism is a more common major when it comes to editing/writing for a magazine or newspaper. But, like I said, there are no strict guidelines. In fact, many people at TransWorld didn’t attend college but have been involved in the industry for many years, so they have the necessary experience to be a part of the magazine. One of the many great things about TransWorld is it offers a lot of opportunities to a wide variety of people. I agree that this is one of the best jobs around, and I think it would absolutely be worth your time to send a resume our way when you graduate–you never know what may happen.–Tara Miller

Ride With Responsibility

This is very important: I was at Mammoth Mountain on a highly anticipated, beautiful day with lots of fresh powder. There was no crowd, lots of sun, and great snow. On my second run I was riding down a very wide flat section, approaching the lift area, when out of no where–bam! I was plowed down by an out-of-control boarder. I messed up my ribs, spent several hours in the hospital, and lost a great day of boarding, not to mention the next few weeks. And, to make matter worse, the jerk, who happened to be a 30-year-old man, took off after he hit me. I thought with age we get smarter, but I guess not.

I’m an intermediate snowboarder and I’ve been able to develop my speed this season; but more importantly, I have control. I never ride beyond my ability. I wish boarders and skiers would get their heads out of their asses and learn control techniques, and then speed. Because of this jerk, I now sit here in pain, I’ve lost time from work, and I have hospital bills to pay. Thanks a lot!

Jayne Swift

Via Internet

Thank you for sharing your experience with us, Jayne. This seems to be an opportune time to go over a few points of “Your Responsibility Code.” Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing and riding that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below and share with other skiers and riders the responsibility for a great experience. This partial list, officially endorsed by the National Ski Areas Association, can be viewed at www.nsc.org/skisafe.htm.

1. Always stay in control.

2. People ahead of you have the right of way.

3. Stop in a safe place for you and others.

4. Whenever starting downhill or merging, look uphill and yield.

5. Use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.

6. Observe signs and warnings, and keep off closed trails.

7. Know how to use the lifts safely.

Time For A Professional

I need your help to get out of a little bind: I promised several friends that I’d teach them to snowboard this season. The only problem is I taught myself to snowboard, and therefore have no idea how to give a helpful lesson to another. I realize you often give tips on how to learn to snowboard, so I thought you might have some advice on teaching.

Clay Blaha

Boise, Idaho

We do have a few suggestions for you. One of the most important things for you to remember when with your friends who are beginners is the pain you were in after your first day on the hill. To spare some of the pain (theirs) and frustration (yours) that can go along with the learning process, you should make sure all your friends’ equipment fits properly. This means no boards from the early 80s, and no sock stuffing–their boots, that is. Also, remind them constantly to keep their knees bent. Lastly, don’t forget to let them know this is the toughest stage of learning how to snowboard–and it only gets better from here on out.

However, we strongly recommend that you take an intermediate lesson from a professional since you’ve never had one, and urge your friends to take a beginner lesson before learning more from you. There’s nothing worse than teaching your friends your own bad habits you’ve picked up along the way.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns¿) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. Or, for those of you who are beyond the rest of us and have access to the World Wide Web, you can post cyber-letters on transworldsnowboarding.com. of “Your Responsibility Code.” Regardless of how you decide to enjoy the slopes, always show courtesy to others and be aware that there are elements of risk in skiing and riding that common sense and personal awareness can help reduce. Observe the code listed below and share with other skiers and riders the responsibility for a great experience. This partial list, officially endorsed by the National Ski Areas Association, can be viewed at www.nsc.org/skisafe.htm.

1. Always stay in control.

2. People ahead of you have the right of way.

3. Stop in a safe place for you and others.

4. Whenever starting downhill or merging, look uphill and yield.

5. Use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.

6. Observe signs and warnings, and keep off closed trails.

7. Know how to use the lifts safely.

Time For A Professional

I need your help to get out of a little bind: I promised several friends that I’d teach them to snowboard this season. The only problem is I taught myself to snowboard, and therefore have no idea how to give a helpful lesson to another. I realize you often give tips on how to learn to snowboard, so I thought you might have some advice on teaching.

Clay Blaha

Boise, Idaho

We do have a few suggestions for you. One of the most important things for you to remember when with your friends who are beginners is the pain you were in after your first day on the hill. To spare some of the pain (theirs) and frustration (yours) that can go along with the learning process, you should make sure all your friends’ equipment fits properly. This means no boards from the early 80s, and no sock stuffing–their boots, that is. Also, remind them constantly to keep their knees bent. Lastly, don’t forget to let them know this is the toughest stage of learning how to snowboard–and it only gets better from here on out.

However, we strongly recommend that you take an intermediate lesson from a professional since you’ve never had one, and urge your friends to take a beginner lesson before learning more from you. There’s nothing worse than teaching your friends your own bad habits you’ve picked up along the way.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space, or passed on to those ornery Angry Interns¿) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. Or, for those of you who are beyond the rest of us and have access to the World Wide Web, you can post cyber-letters on transworldsnowboarding.com.