Letters 13.7

This is a very important message everyone must read: Our two winners this month, Jeanette Oertli and Casey Koyczan, need to contact us because we don’t have their addresses to hook them up with their new gear from Alphanumeric and Drop. So, Jeanette and Casey, send us your address and phone number with a copy of your driver’s license or some other form of identification so we know it’s really you. And for the rest of you out there, you only have one more chance to be fully outfitted for free, so send in your letters A.S.A.P.

It’s Never Too Late

I want to say a huge thank you for being such an inspiration to women. I’m a 24-year-old housewife/mom/snowboarder. I learned to board when I was seventeen, but once I graduated from high school, I got married. Within two years, I gave birth to Bo, now age four, and Dalton, now age three. With all these new additions in my life, I didn’t think I’d ever see the top of a snowy mountain again. Nevertheless, I continued to purchase my monthly issue of TransWorld SNOWboarding, and the more I read, the more I realized lots of women my age were out there doing what they love. So, I went for it. I borrowed pants and a jacket, rented a board and boots, and with the help of some very patient friends, found my second passion in life (my family being my first, of course). Had it not been for your magazine, I don’t think I would’ve had the confidence to get back out there.

Jeanette Oertli

Kellogg, Idaho

We’re flattered to hear that TWS has put you back in your boots and on the mountain again. Just because you’re a wife and a mother, doesn’t mean you don’t deserve some time for yourself. Keep it up! And in the meantime, let us hook you up with some gear of your own from Alphanumeric and a pair of gloves from Drop. Now you’re one step closer to getting out there regularly.

Hecklers Versus The Grom

As my friend and I sat on a stopped chairlift, I noticed two boarders in front of us laughing hysterically. I looked around to see what was so funny when I saw some kid lifting his face out of the snow while spitting out a mouthful of the cold white stuff. My friend told me the snowboarder, probably between the age of seven and ten, had just pulled a frontside 90 off a tiny kicker. What surprised me was, after unstrapping from his bindings, he got up and hiked back up the fifteen-foot incline to the jump again, being heckled by the boarders the entire time. The grom tried again to land the frontside 180, but still ate snow. There was no question that the grom was getting mad, so I yelled out to him that swinging his arms in front of him right before leaving the lip would create the extra spin he needed. So he hiked back up with that in mind, while I received glances of hate from the two riders in the chair ahead. The lift began moving and my friend and I started talking about jerks who bug groms for kicks. A couple minutes later, I looked back in the distance to see the little kid swinging his arms as he bounced off the kicker. Sure enough, he landed the sketchiest 180 I’d ever seen, but it made no difference to him. He rode away with his hands in the air.

Casey Koyczan

Lethbridge, Alberta

You must’ve felt a lot of positive vibes surrounding you after doing your good deed for the day. How can people be so unsupportive of little groms simply doing their best to become better boarders? We hope groms know better when they grow up and become thoughtful boarders like yourself, setting an example to those who have yet to reach maturity. Your good karma has brought you this far–we’d like to reward you with a pair of Drop gloves and some Alphanumeric gear. Enjoy.

Killing Four Birds With One Stone

After reading the October iss of TransWorld SNOWboarding, I finally have the gumption to voice my opinion regarding your lack of coverage of The Seventeenth Annual U.S. Open. The “article” was, in my opinion, a mockery of what our fine sport of snowboarding has become in the seventeen years the U.S. Open has been running. Four whole pages of photos and captions isn’t quite what I’d call “Premier Event” coverage (three photos of snowboarding, two of rappers, two beer references, and a couple that I’m not really sure what they have to do with snowboarding). I’ll bet there was far more going on in Stratton than your four pages let on. Then, the results page was the biggest joke of all … I’m sure the Alpinists and boardercross athletes were really stoked on those contest results, let alone their (lack of) photos. So, where is the drama? Where is the coverage? Where are the words that capture the vibe of the event? And when you asked, “How many birds (middle fingers) do you see flying in this photo?” I counted four, three in the picture and, of course, my own.

Steve Stasiuk

Aspen, Colorado

If you had counted four birds in the photo, and one of them was yours, would you quit your bitching and be stoked you were in the magazine? Then you could impress all your friends and spend your time on more productive things instead of telling us how we should stop trying to promote snowboarding. After all, can you truly “get the vibe” of any aspect of snowboarding from reading a magazine?

In all honesty, Steve, I can’t believe we pulled that blunder off, either. What a bunch of jerks! Where did we even get the nerve to put a blurb like “Premier Event” on the cover, knowing damn well we didn’t have a story for the U.S. Open. So, you’ve got a point, but hear me out and let’s see if I can shed some light on this matter.

First of all, there was a lack of photos submitted by the photographers, including myself. I stayed the last day to shoot the boardercross event, and shoot I did. However, this was the first year for the boardercross, and the course left plenty to be desired. Just ask Leslee Olson, who blew her knee out toward the finish line, or the kid (I think it was Lane Knaack) who hurt his knee toward the top. Second, we only ran four pages because that’s all we had available for the “article.” The “vibe of the event” could have used four more pages just to capture the snowball fights, banner stealing, bottle throwing, and brawls, which happen every year. I thought a partial spread of Ross “Hometown Hero” Powers winning the event, as well as the spot photos of Big Joe and Fat Pun were a good start to depict what went down.

As for the racers, or “Alpinists” as you like to call them, well, we’ve been dissing them for a few years now. Especially since we decided to focus on the freestyle aspect of snowboarding. Besides, that’s what Snowboard Life is for–Alpinists, freeriders, and boardercross athletes. Wondering why there weren’t any photos of the big-air event? Me, too! I think the fact that it was held at night and security wouldn’t let 25 to 35 photographers set up wherever they wanted is a good indicator. Last, we forgot the six Ps before we decided to run this lame “article”: Prior Planning Prevents Piss-Poor Performance. Maybe next year, Steve.–Shem Roose

Bruised And Confused

I’ve been snowboarding for four years, and last year I decided to try the park. Before I went, I made sure to read some of the tips you gave other readers on how to go off jumps correctly. Well, on almost all of the jumps I went off, I ate it. I kept landing on my toeside for some reason, and that would make me fall hard on my knees. On one jump, I fell on my toeside and went chin first into the snow, which left a cut that everyone at school made fun of. On another jump that same day, I again fell on my knees. I landed so hard, my right knee swelled up instantly. Since I was by myself and had no one to help me up, I scooted my butt across to the side of the mountain to wait for the pain to stop. What am I doing wrong? What’s making me land on my toeside? Do I need more or less speed? Or is the problem my board? I ride a 148 when, for my size (100 pounds), I should ride a 142. I tried bending my knees when going up the jump, and I also tried looking for a spot to land, but it didn’t seem to help. Please give me some pointers so this year guys won’t get grossed out by my banged-up chin and knees. Any advice you give me will help because you’re the best.

Rachel Styber

Hemet, California

It’s all about practice. Ride the park as much as possible and stick to the smaller jumps–that way you won’t get too damaged if you crash. To avoid landing on one edge or the other, head toward the jump with your knees bent and your board flat on the snow. In the air, stay balanced with your knees bent and your board directly under you. Land the jump with your knees bent and your board flat-based. Ride straight away from the jump, and there you have it–a stomped landing. If for some reason you crash, dust yourself off and try again. As far as cuts and bruises go, don’t even trip–guys dig banged-up chicks.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. Those of you who have too much time on your hands and have access to the World Wide Web can post cyber-letters on transworldsnowboarding.com.

toeside and went chin first into the snow, which left a cut that everyone at school made fun of. On another jump that same day, I again fell on my knees. I landed so hard, my right knee swelled up instantly. Since I was by myself and had no one to help me up, I scooted my butt across to the side of the mountain to wait for the pain to stop. What am I doing wrong? What’s making me land on my toeside? Do I need more or less speed? Or is the problem my board? I ride a 148 when, for my size (100 pounds), I should ride a 142. I tried bending my knees when going up the jump, and I also tried looking for a spot to land, but it didn’t seem to help. Please give me some pointers so this year guys won’t get grossed out by my banged-up chin and knees. Any advice you give me will help because you’re the best.

Rachel Styber

Hemet, California

It’s all about practice. Ride the park as much as possible and stick to the smaller jumps–that way you won’t get too damaged if you crash. To avoid landing on one edge or the other, head toward the jump with your knees bent and your board flat on the snow. In the air, stay balanced with your knees bent and your board directly under you. Land the jump with your knees bent and your board flat-based. Ride straight away from the jump, and there you have it–a stomped landing. If for some reason you crash, dust yourself off and try again. As far as cuts and bruises go, don’t even trip–guys dig banged-up chicks.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. Those of you who have too much time on your hands and have access to the World Wide Web can post cyber-letters on transworldsnowboarding.com.