Spending time on the couch recovering from injuries sucks. While all your friends are out playing, you’re stuck staring at another rerun of The Dukes Of Hazard. So to help speed up the healing process, the bitchen folks over at Concept and Bombshell are hooking some bros up with new gear.

Got Milk

I just wanted to send a letter to you guys, and tell you how boring, pointless, and not fun my summer and winter have been. Okay, here I go. I saved my money for three years because I was willing to do just about anything to go to Woodward International Extreme Sports Camp. I finally got the money, and waited for what seemed like ten years to leave. My mom and I left one Saturday at 6:00 a.m. I got there, set up my bunk, checked out all the hot gymnasts, and meet some new friends. All I have to say is that place rocks. The next morning I got up before everyone and was sitting outside in full pads, board in hand, ready to go. I finally got to skate, and guess what happened? I broke my shin while skateboarding the vert ramp. It sucked royally, but at least they gave me my money back.

I had to wait six months to get back on my board, and by this time I was really anxious to go snowboarding. Luckily, there was a class trip to Okemo coming up, so I said, what the hell, I’m going. Once there, me and my buds, Jordan and Mike, started riding around the mountain. I was ahead of them, but while doing a toeside carve, I felt something give in my leg. I tried to ride it off, like a dedicated rider would, but it didn’t happen. The ski-patrol guys came down and hauled my sorry butt down the mountain.

I found out the next day that I had refractured my leg in the same exact spot. I was so pissed off, I wanted to beat the hell out of something.

Well, here I am letting my board collect dust, wishing I could relive the whole season. I hope you can understand how much it sucked to be fourteen and not able to mountain bike, skateboard, or snowboard for ten months. I just want every snowboarder and skateboarder out there to stick with it and stay off drugs, they’ll screw you over in the long run.

P.S. Your mag rocks! I’ve been reading it for years.

Chris Willington

Salem, Connecticut

Chris, you’re hating it. To break your run of bad luck, Concept is sending a little love your way. We know from firsthand experience how depressing injuries can be. It might be a good idea for you to start drinking milk and working out. Turn into a jock during the off-season and come next winter, you’ll be unstoppable.

Neck Braces Versus Step-Ins

I returned yesterday from my very first snowboarding trip to Mammoth Mountain, California. I had so much fun learning to stay on my rails, and other tricks for getting to the bottom of the mountain without killing myself. I ate it hard many times, and it took me two hours to complete my first run. At the end of the day I ended up in a neck brace. I guess I had torn some ligaments on one of my many falls. I truly became one with the snow.

I’m seriously thinking of taking this snowboarding sport up as a hobby. My question is, do you recommend step-ins or conventional bindings? I heard that step-ins don’t offer much ankle support, but it seems to me that they have better control for mobility on the board. Which one would you recommend for a beginner? Thanks for making such a great magazine for me to read while I’m home in my neck brace.

Alicia Peterson

Temecula, California

To provide relief from your neck problems, try rubbing some Tiger Balm analgesic rub on the sore area and then putting on your new outfit from Bombshell clothing company.

This question regarding the bindings is asked by newcomers to the sport and veterans alike. Step-ins are easy to use and it only takes a send or two to get into them. They are much stiffer than conventional bindings, and can cause lots of toe and heel drag if you have big feet. Conventional bindings have more flexibility in the boot and binding–allowing you to tweak your tricks better and not look like a gingerbread man.

What it all comes down to in the end is personal preference. Try out each kind before deciding on one or the other.

 

All Waxed Up With Nowhere To Go

Hey what’s up? My name is Amber Theobald and I am a fourteen-year-old ninth grader, who lives in White Rock, B.C. I’m writing to tell you how much I love your magazine. I only started boarding this year, but I caught on quick and I can already do 180s. The next time I go up I plan on learning 360s. Anyway, I’m writing to ask you to please put more stuff of Barrett Christy in your magazine. I think she is the best female snowboarder out there because she tries so hard and doesn’t give up. Also, she goes all-out on her tricks, and it is awesome to watch her before I go out on the slopes.

Another thing, I was wondering if I could have some tips on how to wax a snowboard, I figure I should be able to do it myself.

Amber Theobald

White Rock, B.C.Canada

Barrett is also one of our favorite snowboarders, and that’s one of the reasons why she got the cover of this year’s Buyer’s Guide. Here’s a brief explanation of how to wax:

1. Purchase a plastic scraper and some high-quality wax from either a snowboard shop or a mail-order catalog.

2. Read the directions on the wax package. If there are none, set the iron to a temperature that will just melt the wax when it is placed on the iron. If the wax starts smoking, turn the temperature down.

3. Place the bar of wax on the base of the iron while holding the iron at a 90-degree angle. Beads of wax will begin dripping onto your snowboard. Cover your board pretty well with little wax dots. Rub the iron over these dots until the wax is melted into a thin, even coat across the bottom of your board.

4. Let your board set overnight. If you don’t have that long, ten minutes will do. Once the wax is cool to the touch, use the plastic scraper to remove all the visible wax. A thin, smooth layer of wax should be the end result. Be sure to check out the wax review in Products this issue; it will shed some light on this sticky topic.

Not A Clue

Hey, I’m looking to buy a new snowboard, but I don’t know what board is right for me. I like to ride the whole mountain, searching for powder, and I also like to ride jumps. I weigh 130 pounds and wear size nine-and-a-half boots. If possible, please find me something that is not too expensive, because I don’t have a lot of money.

Eric Staples

Snohomish, Washington

Eric, cruise down to a snowboard shop and tell them your dilemma. They will usually have a wide selection of used boards to fit your budget, and they are fairly knowledgeable when it comes to pairing a board to your weight and height.

One Wild And Crazy Guy

Hi, my name is Tom and I’m from Czech Republic in Europe. Now I’m twenty and live eleven months in Chicago, Illinois. I ride snowboard and skateboard four years. In Czech it is really bad, no money for skatepark, and in winter, little snow. I’d dream all my friends go to U.S.A and see a lot of good people skate and snowboard. Now I’m here and happy. I need f–king lots of money so buy new skate and snowboard, and then you will see how good are Czech guys. Thanks, and I hope see ya in some California skatepark or some summer camp. You’ll find me, because I’ll be the best!

Tom Deli

Chicago, Illinois

Welcome to America. We can always use another Czech swinger.

Stuck In The Ozarks

I have a big problem. I was born in Colorado, and before I had time to enjoy it, my parents had to go and do something stupid–they moved to Arkansas. Now, I live hundreds of miles from anything that even remotely resembles a snowboarding mountain.

Last winter, while visiting some of my relatives, my uncle taught me how to snowboard. I did good and I think if I snowboarded enough, I could become real good. The only problem is that I only get to snowboard during Christmas and spring break. As you can see, I get almost no practice. I would love to move to the mountains, but I’m only sixteen. I dream about snowboarding all day long and I live off of your magazine and snowboarding videos. So, to all the people who can choose when and where they want to go ride, don’t take it for granted, because it really sucks to have to wait almost a whole year to go snowboarding.

Joe Qualm

Gentry, Arkansas

Joe, you’re just going to have to tough it out. Once you hit eighteen, pack your bags, and take off for the slopes. Two more years won’t kill you.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. Those of you who have too much time on your hands and have access to the World Wide Web can post cyber-letters on snowboarding-online at www.twsnow.com.

r.

Stuck In The Ozarks

I have a big problem. I was born in Colorado, and before I had time to enjoy it, my parents had to go and do something stupid–they moved to Arkansas. Now, I live hundreds of miles from anything that even remotely resembles a snowboarding mountain.

Last winter, while visiting some of my relatives, my uncle taught me how to snowboard. I did good and I think if I snowboarded enough, I could become real good. The only problem is that I only get to snowboard during Christmas and spring break. As you can see, I get almost no practice. I would love to move to the mountains, but I’m only sixteen. I dream about snowboarding all day long and I live off of your magazine and snowboarding videos. So, to all the people who can choose when and where they want to go ride, don’t take it for granted, because it really sucks to have to wait almost a whole year to go snowboarding.

Joe Qualm

Gentry, Arkansas

Joe, you’re just going to have to tough it out. Once you hit eighteen, pack your bags, and take off for the slopes. Two more years won’t kill you.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space) should be sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com. Those of you who have too much time on your hands and have access to the World Wide Web can post cyber-letters on snowboarding-online at www.twsnow.com.