Letters 13#2

Our lives aren't always filled with lollipops and rainbows. But every day when the mailman arrives, a little ray of sunshine fills our office. Hopefully, by sharing these letters your day will be a little brighter, too. Please write us. The world can always use a little more happiness.

This month's most creative letter writers are receiving gear from Cold as Ice and Quiksilver.

Life Is Good

Yo, Ed.! I am a thirteen-year-old skier, but ever since I read your 'zine I've wanted to board. Unfortunately, I don't have a job, and I can't afford any equipment. I recently figured that a dismantled skateboard might work. I decided to ride my bike up Old Grouse Road in hopes of coming out at the top of the Grouse ski area, which would let me get in a run without paying for a lift ticket.

It was about five kilometers from the top, and being Vancouver, it was raining like hell. Naturally, I was the only weirdo dumb enough to be out biking that day. On the way up, I started thinking about what I was going to do with my bike when I got to the top, and it suddenly started snowing. After my tires began to slide, I had to push my bike up the hill, which was tough in six inches of snow. When there was nine inches of snow I could barely push my bike. I lifted the bike on my shoulder and carried it. The road seemed to go on for miles and I couldn't see shit. I was up in the middle of a cloud and I'd never been all the way up the road before. I thought that the tire tracks on the ground were an indication that the road went somewhere, but due to my excessively small amount of luck, I came to a sign suspended on a post that said, “Private Property: no motor vehicles, motor bikes, or mountain bikes beyond this point.” I sunk down into the fourteen inches of snow, for about ten minutes, feeling that all was lost. The road was only a ten-degree pitch–hopeless for sliding a roughly sanded wood board. Eventually, I got up and carried my bike back down to the bottom of the snow. When I got on it, the brakes didn't work because wet brake pad was smeared all over the rims. I got back home and was wet, cold, tired, stiff, and thought to myself, “Life is good.”

Will Keats-Osborn

North Vancouver, British Columbia

We understand your pain, but wasn't it nice to be outside enjoying Mother Nature? Quiksilver will be sending you gear to get started. To help you find a better spot to shred, we called Rob Dow. He says, “Try Cypress Mountain or Mount Seymour, they always have lots of snow.”

In The Garden With Mum

A few months ago I went to a university in the mountains of Wales, Britain. I chose this place because I hoped I could begin snowboarding–the course of study was a secondary thought. Anyway, my dad died so I had to give up university life to be at home with my mum. I still haven't been snowboarding, but my boyfriend is paying for us both to have snowboarding lessons for my birthday in April. For the past few weeks I've been so excited about going to our crappy little indoor, fake snow-ski centre in our city. I can't wait to go, even if the whole thing is the size of my back garden. I have been practicing moves on a plank of wood in my back garden.

I wanted to say how lucky you all are to be where you can snowboard. To live and grow up with this way of life must be so amazing. The place where I live has one tiny shop in the next city, which sells about five different, very expensive, snowboards. I have been several times to stare at them and dream of the days I will be a snowboarding champion of Britain! Take it easy. Thanks for giving me inspiration.

Jill Tovey

Longlevens, Gloucester, England

No, thank you for inspiring us with your letter. Boy, shredding on plastic, we can appreciate yr enthusiasm toward a sport we hold so dear to our hearts. It is our pleasure to help you get started on your way to a lifetime of pow turns, big airs, and phat jibs. Cold As Ice will be dropping you gear near your garden. Long live Lemmy!

Wax Me

Hey, my name is Dan Sherman and I live in Dummerston, Vermont. My friend and I are doing a project on snowboarding and which wax works the best, and if the length of your board makes a difference with speed. This is for our school science fair, and we were wondering if you could write back to us and give us some info.

Dan and Patrick

Dummerston, Vermont

We consulted wax-master Mr. Matt Cummins of One Ball Jay, and this is what he had to say: “You're never gonna know which wax to use until you've checked out the conditions. The temperature as well as the amount of water in the snow will effect what type of wax will work best. There's a lot that goes into picking a quality wax. Feel free to call us at (253) 565-5811 for any help you might need.”

Shredders Taking Care Of Shredders.

Hi TransWorld, I'm here to tell you about the most awesome snowboard company in the world, Joyride. Last year, I bought a Joyride from World Boards snowboard shop. I rode it right into this year, but a funny thing happened to me on Deer Park lift at Bridger Bowl. I was riding, minding my own business, when I noticed it was a mite hard to turn. As I sat down to fix my bindings (because it had to be them, not me forgetting how to turn), my friend Levi said, “Oh my gosh Sara, look at this.” Well you see, this scared me 'cause he seemed to be looking at the base of my lovely ride. I took his advice and to my horror I saw that my base had indeed delaminated to the point of being unrideable. I didn't know what to do. I was scared, then I was angry, then I was wondering, “What the heck am I supposed to do now?” The owner of World Boards, Jay, sent the board back to the company, and they sent me back a new '98/99 board. I'd like to close with a little tribute to my favorite company:

Joyride you're the best.

You're so much cooler than the rest.

Joyride you're the talk of the town.

Joyride you'll never let me down.

Sara Christine Haag

Bozeman, Montana

Wow Sara, your letter was both inspiring and informative. We too have known the pain and frustration involved with having a delaminated stick. Thank goodness that everything worked out for the best.

Calling All Normal Riders

Full respect to Burton and Stratton for hosting another killer U.S. Open. I look forward to the Open with excitement every year–for me it's a time to celebrate the sport of snowboarding and the end of another season by riding with my bros while witnessing world-class riders pushing their limits in an exceptionally snowboarder-friendly environment.

This year, while watching the halfpipe finals, I saw a beer bottle fly through the air and into a packed crowd of spectators. One might say, “Okay, there's always gonna be an asshole to contaminate an otherwise ideal environment like this.” I say bullshit. If I were standing next to the moron who threw that bottle, I would get right in his face and expect others around me to join in (especially if the guy were bigger than I am). It is up to normal riders of the world to stop these few brainless jerks from pulling shit like this and perpetuating the negative meathead snowboarder stereotype–particularly at an event as high profile and respected as the U.S. Open.

Peter McCallum

New York, New York

Right on, man, we love heroes. Thanks for the letter and helping to make the U.S. Open a safer place.

Free Thinking

Canada is considered a very multicultural country, but why don't our schools play every national anthem of every country that's represented within the schools? It seems kind of selfish to play only one anthem, of which only two-thirds of the school's population understands the words.

I joined a kid in doing something in class today that was frowned upon by several other students in our class. Together, we sat silently through the national anthem, while every student in every class across Canada, except a few like us, were standing, singing along in their heads, the words to this patriotic hymn.

Free country? Maybe. More like free, but with a little pinch of brainwash and capitalism. Only free if you're strong enough to choose what you want, when you want, how you want, where you want, and for whatever reason you deem appropriate.

You may ask yourself how does this apply to snowboarding? Ultimately, it doesn't. A week ago I read the Launch section of your January 1999 issue and it inspired me to think, and in the end, to write this. A word of advice–whatever you do in life, do it knowing that in the end you'll be happy with the decision you make. If you're going to buy a pair of Burton snow pants, make sure it's because you know they're going to last. No matter how hard the corporations want it to be, being “cool” will never be worth 400 dollars.

Thanks for providing your support for individuality and for being a good influence on the rest of the snowboarding community.

Corey Wood

Guelph, Ontario, Canada

No, thank you for inspiring us to write. We'll never want to hear one of those ethnocentric melodies while snowboarding again.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space) should sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA. 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com Those of you who have too much time on your hands and have access to the World Wide Web can post cyber-letters on snowboarding-online at www.twsnow.com.

 

sidered a very multicultural country, but why don't our schools play every national anthem of every country that's represented within the schools? It seems kind of selfish to play only one anthem, of which only two-thirds of the school's population understands the words.

I joined a kid in doing something in class today that was frowned upon by several other students in our class. Together, we sat silently through the national anthem, while every student in every class across Canada, except a few like us, were standing, singing along in their heads, the words to this patriotic hymn.

Free country? Maybe. More like free, but with a little pinch of brainwash and capitalism. Only free if you're strong enough to choose what you want, when you want, how you want, where you want, and for whatever reason you deem appropriate.

You may ask yourself how does this apply to snowboarding? Ultimately, it doesn't. A week ago I read the Launch section of your January 1999 issue and it inspired me to think, and in the end, to write this. A word of advice–whatever you do in life, do it knowing that in the end you'll be happy with the decision you make. If you're going to buy a pair of Burton snow pants, make sure it's because you know they're going to last. No matter how hard the corporations want it to be, being “cool” will never be worth 400 dollars.

Thanks for providing your support for individuality and for being a good influence on the rest of the snowboarding community.

Corey Wood

Guelph, Ontario, Canada

No, thank you for inspiring us to write. We'll never want to hear one of those ethnocentric melodies while snowboarding again.

Letters (which may be edited for clarity and space) should sent in marked: Letter To The Editor, TransWorld SNOWboarding. By snail-trail mail: 353 Airport Rd., Oceanside, CA. 92054. By FAX: (760) 722-0653. By electronic mail: snowletters@twsnet.com Those of you who have too much time on your hands and have access to the World Wide Web can post cyber-letters on snowboarding-online at www.twsnow.com.