Launch #2

Here it is, the beginning of a new volume (that’s publishing talk for a new year of magazines), and I still haven’t been fired! Last fall when I got this job I figured it would take them three months, maybe four at most to figure out that I don’t know shit about being an editor. I just wanted another year of riding and was willing to pretend to know how to write to get it.

Last winter I had the best two weeks ever at Mt. Baker. Baker recieved about three feet of new snow every night, and I got to do lines I never thought I would ever do. One of those days, when I stopped for lunch, I had a short chat with Jeff Galbraith. I’ve never been able to tell if he hates me or not, so when (with a slight grin) he told me he thought I was doing a good job, I was kind of blown away. I was trying to figure out if he was grinning because of how epic it was outside, or if he was just razzing me. Then it hit me-I’m pulling it off. Here’s someone who has been involved with magazines for as long as I can remember, a super talented writer whose work I’ve enjoyed for years, and he doesn’t even know it’s a scam. I was feeling like the big man. I always thought that no one even reads these magazines, but I wrote something this amazing senior editor from a mediocre magazine thought was good-my scam was working better than I thought, and I didn’t even know it.

So, here I was sitting in my office, thinking I’m the big man, thinking what to write to inspire you. I was thinking of how to rip off one of the few things I can even remember reading in a snowboarding magazine. It was this piece Ken Achenbach wrote about keys. He said something to the effect that when he first started riding, he had keys to nothing, then he started getting all these keys (to an apartment, car, work, etc.) because he thought it would help him ride more. Long story short-the more keys he got, the less he rode.

After reading it I figured I didn’t want any keys, Ken was right about the more responsibility you get, the less you ride. That’s when the bomb hit me. Galbraith knows, he was up there the whole time I was. Riding powder every day like I was. He was smirking because he knew about my scam. Then slowly I began to smirk, Jeff wasn’t talking to me as an editor or a writer, he was talking to me as a snowboarder. He knew of my scam because it was his long before it was mine.-David (learning how to grift) Sypniewski