Intro By John Sommers

If I had a rival opponent out there it would have to be Keir Dillon, no matter if it’s in the halfpipe; the last run of the day, racing down the mountain to see who’s the fastest; playing basketball, golf, or whatever. Keir is always trying to take your money in some kind of bet. Every time I drop into a halfpipe when that kid’s around, he’s always trying to call me out, “Oh, what, you want to battle today?” Keir will make a competition out of anything. That’s what I love about him.

I first met Keir at the USASA Nationals in Minnesota about five years ago. I woke up super early the first day, hoping to get used to the pipe before anyone else. So, I hike up to the pipe thinking I’ll have it all to myself. When I finally got to the pipe there was this kid with dreads busting huge frontside lien airs. I walked up to the top, strapped in, and busted out some methods. Next thing I know we had our own little jam session going, at 7:00 a.m.

It was cool to meet Keir that way. I guess that’s why we’re so comfortable talking trash on each other because we have that sort of competitive history. Our friend Jamil would tell him to stop being afraid of the halfpipe and go faster. Jamil always competed the same way I did with Keir. That’s how our family of friends is, because we’ve grown up riding and traveling around the world, forming an alliance of talent and friendships, The Alliance Movement for the future.

Keir has progressed so much in a short period of time. Having someone like Keir around¿calling each other out on tricks, on whose style is better, or which trick is wack, putting pressure on each other¿encourages progression within the sport. Keir is one of my best friends, and that’s what makes a healthy competitiveness between us, because it’s always for fun.

And one more thing, don’t be fooled by Keir’s basketball skills. I’ll give him his shooting; he’s got a good outside shot. But the moment you start playing tight defense on him, he becomes lazy, and then you own him.¿John Sommers

Where’d you learn to snowboard?

Shawnee Mountain, Pennsylvania. Actually, I learned how to ski at a mountain called Camel Back about fifteen minutes away, but the night skiing there sucked so we had to transfer to Shawnee for about seven years. Skiing was super boring and beat because the mountain was only 400 vertical feet, so I started snowboarding when I was eleven.

Did all you PA boys hang out together?

Pennsylvania’s huge, and when I was growing up it was super competitive. Everyone was kind of friends, but when you went to some place like Roundtop it was all business. You had to go face Colin Lentz, and Pete Walsh, and their crews. It was super cliquey. I was thirteen, fourteen, fifteen. It was all about the Shawnee boys showing up and trying to kick some ass. It was all about pride. You never wanted to lose at home and victory on the road was always much sweeter.

Are the contests important to you?

I don’t know if contests are so important to me, I just like doing them. It’s important for my career, but I love the competition factor, which I think spawns from when I was a little tot. Everything is a contest to me, whether it’s UNO, all-night MarioKart sessions, or Alpine Slides down a small mountain¿just makes it that much more fun.

So what happens when you lose?

You realize you have to get your shit together. I went to a contest in Europe two years ago and got my ass handed to me. It was the best contest I ever went to because I got my ass handed to me.

Who handed you your ass?

Everybody over there. Laughs They were like, “Go back to the States. You don’t want none of this.” It shows me I have that much more improvement to do. It sucks if youose, especially if you thought that you did better than you placed, but that’s just what happens. Just like you win when you shouldn’t have won. That happens a lot, too. It’s not like you can get depressed, it’s just a contest. It does suck when you see ten Gs slip away though.

Okay, so let’s talk about money.Are you going to sell out to that soda-pop commercial?

If you call doing the same thing other athletes and rock stars do, then probably. I don’t look at Busta Rhymes any differently after his Mountain Dew commercial and DC has a commercial on MTV. I don’t view trying to make enough money to live selling out. I don’t get caught up in all that what’s cool, what’s not. I just want to live a good life with my friends, girl, and family.

Money doesn’t mean happiness, though.

I remember when my friends and I used to go to Vermont, sleep in the back of the van, twenty degrees below zero, like six of us curled up in one blanket, just to get the first day at Killington. Knowing that it was going to suck and that you were probably going to get the good Vermont weather¿rain. The full diehards. Every pro has his beginning stories¿when you’re young and hungry, and would do anything to get one day of snow in October, because you haven’t ridden since the Open.

Do you still think you’re that hungry?

Yeah, but in a different way. I think that when you’re that young it allows you to be that weird kind of crazy hungry. I work way harder now. Back then I didn’t work. I was just diehard.

Eventually you can start to afford things. At the time it didn’t seem bad to get a hotel room and sneak eight to ten people in¿it was just normal.

Who do you like to ride with?

When I was growing up it was my boys Tim Simet, Jerel Schmon, and Evan Ivkovick. Now, I like riding with Luke Wynan, John Sommers, Ross Powers, and Abe Teter.

Who do you look up to?

Mostly I look up to all the diehards out there, whether they are beginners or pros. Whoever is out there throwing down and trying to push themselves or the sport. Like Michalchuk, Powers, or Sommers, and also kids with flavor like Jamie Lynn, Dave Downing, and of course Peter Line¿don’t even try to fade him.

How long have you been sponsored?

I first got sponsored by Mike Hoefer from Burton as a rep rider, the Twin 39 year, the board with the girls on the bottom. I was about fifteen or sixteen, six years ago. I was a rep rider for a year, and then got on the factory team, then I hurt my knee, which set me back for a year and a half.

Do you want to go to the Olympics?

What kind of question is that? Hell yeah. I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t want to go. That’s a huge gold mine. It sucks that I wasn’t good enough to go to the last one.

You were pretty much injured, though.

Ahh, injuries. Sarcastically Love ‘em. You need injuries. They keep you in check. It’s bad to get them, but the idea needs to be there or kids would be out of hand. The threat of injury keeps you consciously healthy.

So what actually happened?

I got hurt at the Vans Triple Crown in a beat seven-foot halfpipe, super beat. Right after making the finals I was just trying to relearn a McTwist nine. It was after they closed the pipe, too. A little bit of bad karma, I guess. I came up short, went like 800, landed flat, and twisted my knee. It was actually a lower bruise on my bone. I had to be in a wheelchair for like three days and then had to walk with a cane for several months. Cut pretty much two-and-a-half months off my season.

How come you don’t skate any more?

I love skating but it’s addictive. You push around and you instantly want to do a trick, try this or try that. It’s so easy to get hurt. I give much respect to anyone who skates, it’s just too hard. The only thing I do now is basketball, mess around on the computer, hang out with my girl, and swimming.

You’re really into the stock market. How’d that happen?

My dad forced me, forced me. Pretty much made me open up an account. He got into it and thought it would be good to educate me, which now I think is good. Whether I eventually lose money or make money, it has taught me a lot about how the economy works.

How much money are we talking?

I put my whole savings in, and within the first two months I had lost half of my investment. I was freaking for the first couple of weeks, thinking I could’ve bought a car! But then it all came back, and got up to eight times what I put in. Now, I’m back to only about three times. It goes up and down. The money I invested was money I could kind of afford to lose. It’s super fun, like gambling. And I love gambling. But I lose all the time. Blackjack, the worst game in the world.

Give us a stock tip.

Like they say in the commercial, serious deep voice, “Buy low. Sell high.” Laughs Actually, I like high-risk Internet stock. They’re super risky right now, but if you’re looking long term, they’re not really high risk. It’s just computers and computers are obviously taking over. Everyone has a Web site now, it’s just ridiculous.

You have a Web site. What’s the address?

www.keirdillon.com. It’s still in construction. I think it will always be in construction. I’m new at it and I have a guy helping me right now. It’s just super basic, pictures of me, trick tips, almost set up like a magazine, changing every month. Interviews of other people and just random kids, gear reviews, whatever I feel like throwing in. I am trying to set up a spot for kids to e-mail me pics of themselves so I can post them up and help them get noticed.

Who do you want to thank?

My sponsors, Burton and Jake, Arnette, Gravis, and Nixon. Now the people I’d like to thank: Jake, Mike Hoefer for giving me my first snowboard, and Ennick Harris for helping me through everything and all the guidance. I would also like to thank the following people for dealing with me over the years: Mom, Dad, Vidya my girlfriend, Jerel, Ryan, Nick, Jonus, Luke, Evan, all the photographers, Curtes and Piro, thanks. One more thing, a special thanks to the fake MA$E Cris$ Nieratko¿drop the dollar sign off your name, ’cause you ain’t worth shit! You herb.

ct to anyone who skates, it’s just too hard. The only thing I do now is basketball, mess around on the computer, hang out with my girl, and swimming.

You’re really into the stock market. How’d that happen?

My dad forced me, forced me. Pretty much made me open up an account. He got into it and thought it would be good to educate me, which now I think is good. Whether I eventually lose money or make money, it has taught me a lot about how the economy works.

How much money are we talking?

I put my whole savings in, and within the first two months I had lost half of my investment. I was freaking for the first couple of weeks, thinking I could’ve bought a car! But then it all came back, and got up to eight times what I put in. Now, I’m back to only about three times. It goes up and down. The money I invested was money I could kind of afford to lose. It’s super fun, like gambling. And I love gambling. But I lose all the time. Blackjack, the worst game in the world.

Give us a stock tip.

Like they say in the commercial, serious deep voice, “Buy low. Sell high.” Laughs Actually, I like high-risk Internet stock. They’re super risky right now, but if you’re looking long term, they’re not really high risk. It’s just computers and computers are obviously taking over. Everyone has a Web site now, it’s just ridiculous.

You have a Web site. What’s the address?

www.keirdillon.com. It’s still in construction. I think it will always be in construction. I’m new at it and I have a guy helping me right now. It’s just super basic, pictures of me, trick tips, almost set up like a magazine, changing every month. Interviews of other people and just random kids, gear reviews, whatever I feel like throwing in. I am trying to set up a spot for kids to e-mail me pics of themselves so I can post them up and help them get noticed.

Who do you want to thank?

My sponsors, Burton and Jake, Arnette, Gravis, and Nixon. Now the people I’d like to thank: Jake, Mike Hoefer for giving me my first snowboard, and Ennick Harris for helping me through everything and all the guidance. I would also like to thank the following people for dealing with me over the years: Mom, Dad, Vidya my girlfriend, Jerel, Ryan, Nick, Jonus, Luke, Evan, all the photographers, Curtes and Piro, thanks. One more thing, a special thanks to the fake MA$E Cris$ Nieratko¿drop the dollar sign off your name, ’cause you ain’t worth shit! You herb.