Features 15.7

A couple years ago, pow-ruler Scott Newsome told me about this kid from Banff, Alberta I absolutely had to film with. His name was Jonaven Moore. I thought to myself, “If Newsome says he rips, then he must be sick.” I didn’t know who Jonaven was or what the guy was about, but he came out to Whistler and succeeded in pulling together a full segment for Treetops’s Clearcut in a couple of days. The shredder has been a strong part of our film crew ever since.Jonaven doesn’t need to act cool or talk shit, he just proves himself. Let me put it to you this way-if snowboarding were hockey, I’d be drafting him in the first round.-Brad McGregor, Treetop Films

I haven’t seen you in many contests. What do you do all winter?
I grew up competing a lot, and I found out at a pretty early age I wasn’t super into it. I have a hard time sitting around waiting to do one or two runs. It would always end up dumping the day of the contest, and there was usually somewhere with better conditions. Or I’d just want to do the jam session all day, because that’s where everyone throws down and rides their best anyway-when it’s for yourself and not some judge. I skateboarded a lot when I was young, too, and most of the guys really pushing the progression of that sport are not doing it in contests anyway. The burliest stuff is always in someone’s film segment. So that’s what I want to do-ride the best terrain with all my bros and nail stuff down for a couple of movie parts.

What drives you to get up and go out on sleds to film every day?
I have a hard time with mediocre snowboarding. The cool part about going out to film is that everything you do is usually all-time. If it’s going to make a movie, it means you’re going out to ride something sick. Whether it’s the biggest jumps, best trannies, steepest lines, whatever-I want to be involved in pushing snowboarding to the next level.

I know you’re trying to merge the freestyle and big-mountain part of shredding when we’re out there filming. Do you think that this will be the future of riding, or more the urban “jib” direction?
The best thing about snowboarding is how many different aspects there are to it, and it’s all about what you have access to. The urban scene is great, because it gives the kids something they can look up to and find close to home. Just about anywhere with snow there’s going to be rails. At the same time, there’s this other aspect of snowboarding, what a few of us have started calling “big-mountain freestyle.” I grew up watching the careers of guys like Jamie Lynn, Haakonsen, Kevin Jones. All of them got into the spotlight with park jumps and pipes, but they all ended up taking those skills into the mountains. To me it just seems like a natural progression for snowboarding-doing tech freestyle stuff in mountains where guys used to be scared just to make turns or off a cliff that’s only ever been straight-aired.

Why don’t we see you hitting the rails?
I like to be able to ride everything on the mountain and have spent my share of time on metal. It just happened that most of the filming we did last year didn’t include them.

This summer you started whitewater kayaking. Where’d that come from?
One of my passions in life aside from snowboarding is surfing. I have an addictive relationship with the ocean. My longtime snowboarding friend Joey Vosburgh started kayaking a few years ago and has been raving to me about it since. I figured it was the closest thing to surfing living in the mountains.

You seem pretty amped on it. The creeks and rivers are like the biggest water-slide park ever. I think it scares most people once they get all secured into a boat and put in a moving river. If you can commit to it long enough to get past the initial fear, you’re hooked for sure.

Are there any similarities to snowboarding?
Tons. Once you start getting better you can slash turns, surf sick waves, waterfalls are just like cliff drops, and there’s a ton of aerial freestyle mos, too. Guys are doing full flips off waves, blunts, super cool stuff.

Talk a bit about the Whistler sled scene. Are you chomping at the bit to get out to an area before the other film crews?
Definitely. There was easily eight film crews in the same parking lot most days this past winter. Whistler had great conditions, while I think a lot of North America was lacking. I’ve got to give Brad McGregor and the guys at Treetop Films a ton of credit because they pioneered most of the sled spots for snowboarding around Whistler. We’re pretty competent on sleds, though, so we can almost always find something, but it helps being motivated and getting up early for sure.

Describe what goes into going out filming for a day?
People don’t realize that it’s always a waiting game. Weather is the biggest determining factor. There’re also avalanche and snow conditions; the mobility on sleds and whether or not it’s too deep to even get anywhere; sled management, including gasing up, loading, unloading, transport, mechanical problems; and waiting for everyone to show up on time … the list goes on and on.

Most people don’t realize how dangerous the backcountry is. As spokespeople of the sport, do we have a duty to inform the kids about what really happens out there?
Oh, for sure. One of the things I trip on these days is how desensitized snowboard culture is. Everyone is really putting themselves on the line. I think a lot of films show so many quick-cut clips that people forget what went into filming it or what the consequences were. All those big gaps in the movies are blowing pros’ knees, ankles, and backs left, right, and center. The big-mountain guys have a lot on the line, too. I think that film crews more than anyone have a duty to show the masses how heavy some of the stuff going on really is.

Who are some of the guys out there in need of respect?
Not just in snowboarding, but in general?
Anyone who rebounds from a gnarly injury and still shreds. One of the first people who comes to my mind is Chris Dufficy. He came back from a bunch of gnarly concussions because of his passion to snowboard and his dedication to make it happen. I can relate to his situation-I’ve hit my head a few times, too. I also have a lot of respect for anyone who rides in Alaska. That place is beyond nuts. The guides who work up there deserve mad props, too. And all the gnarly water sports as well-tow-in surfers and guys pushing class five in their kayaks. Any of them make a mistake, and it could all be over.I also respect skateboarders a ton. The dues they pay are unreal. They may not be on the edge of death as often as some other sports, but they definitely get injured more regularly. It’s also more technically difficult than probably any other sport on the planet.

Any advice?
Everything goes full circle. Help someone out, and you’ll see it back in time. If you work hard, people will notice.

Three Words to live by?
Respect, humility, and passion.

Thank you:My mom for everything. Taylor for endless support. My bro Thomas for showing me the light. Anyone who has shown kindness and made me feel like part of the family. Dirk for buying me my first board, Team ‘Core and everyone in Revy for taking me under their wing, Rob Price, Skaters, The Rude Boys, Scott Currie, Troy, Lawrence, and everyone who helped me out in the early days. Brad McGregor for getting me started in the film scene. My sponsors Burton snowboards and Anon goggles. Todd for teaching me to train, my dad for teaching me to surf, Syp for a ton of help, Hatchett for taking me to AK, Swanny for keeping me alive, Joey for talking me into kayaking, and all my bros in Banff for keeping it real. To anyone with the stoke to show a smile-that’s what it’s all about.

“With all this handrail and cheese-wedge stuff flooding the snowboard industry right now, Jonaven Moore is a kid who has his priorities straight. He can ride anything, especially the steep sketchy stuff. Last winter I started calling him the ‘Banff billy goat’ because he’s from Banff, Canada and feels very comfortable jumping from cliff to cliff in the big mountains. He has incredible mountain sense, but can mix the freestyle influence into backcountry riding.”-Dave Downing

J.Moore pull quotes

That’s where everyone throws down and rides their best anyway-when it’s for yourself and not some judge.

I have a hard time with mediocre snowboarding.

I like to be able to ride everything on the mountain and have spent my share of time on metal.t winter I started calling him the ‘Banff billy goat’ because he’s from Banff, Canada and feels very comfortable jumping from cliff to cliff in the big mountains. He has incredible mountain sense, but can mix the freestyle influence into backcountry riding.”-Dave Downing

J.Moore pull quotes

That’s where everyone throws down and rides their best anyway-when it’s for yourself and not some judge.

I have a hard time with mediocre snowboarding.

I like to be able to ride everything on the mountain and have spent my share of time on metal.