Winter Weather Prediction : Old Farmers’ Almanac 2016 – 2017

Winter Weather Forecast 2016 Р2017

We're less than 100 days away from opening day at some resorts in North America and the question on everyone's mind is: Where will it snow?

The Old Farmers' Almanac released their long range Winter Weather Forecast for 2016-2017, and things are looking good for a strong winter in North America. Their regional forecasts, which are calculated 18 months in advance and claim to have an 80% accuracy rate, purport the Northeast and Pacific Northwest to have the most favorable winters for snow enthusiasts.

Check out the New Winter Weather Forecast for 2017 – 2018 Here

Dive into their regional winter weather predictions for a glimmer of where you could score the deepest days this year, and stay tuned for NOAA’s official Long Range Winter Prediction dropping later this month. The Farmer’s Almanac (different from the Old Farmer’s Almanac) predictions can be found here.

Winter Weather Predictions 2016 – 2017 Old Farmers Almanac : Regions

Northeast

Winter will be colder than normal, on average, with slightly above-normal precipitation and near-normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be in mid- and late December, mid- and late January, mid-February, and early March. The snowiest periods will be in mid-November, late January, mid- and late February, and early to mid-March.

Intermountain : Includes mountainous areas in: California, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, Oregon, Washington

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Winter temperatures will be above normal, with precipitation a bit below normal. The coldest periods will be in early and mid- to late December and mid- to late January. Snowfall will be above normal in the north and below normal elsewhere, with the snowiest periods in late November, early and mid-December, and mid-January.

Pacific Northwest

Winter will be rainier than normal. Temperatures will be below normal in the north and above normal in the south, with the coldest periods in early and mid- to late December and mid- to late January. Snowfall will be above normal in the north and below normal in the south, with the snowiest periods in early December and mid-January.

Southern British Columbia

Winter will be colder than normal, with above-normal precipitation and snowfall. The coldest periods will be in early and mid- to late December and mid- to late January, with the snowiest periods in early and mid-December and mid-January.

Upper Mid-West

Winter will be colder than normal, with the coldest periods in mid-December, through most of January, and in early and late February. Precipitation will be a bit above normal in the east and below normal in the west, with snowfall above normal from Minneapolis eastward and below normal in the west. The snowiest periods will be in early to mid- and mid- to late December, mid-January, and early to mid- and late February.

Appalachians

Winter will be slightly warmer than normal, with near-normal precipitation and above-normal snowfall. The coldest periods will be in early to mid-January, from late January through early February, and in mid- to late February. The snowiest periods will be in mid-November, late January, and early to mid-February.

The Rockies

Winter temperatures will be above normal, with precipitation a bit below normal. The coldest periods will be in early and mid- to late December and mid- to late January. Snowfall will be above normal in the north and below normal elsewhere, with the snowiest periods in late November, early and mid-December, and mid-January."

Ed note: The Old Famers' Almanac has been predicting weather patterns since 1792 based on a secret formula created by their founder, Robert B. Thomas. The Old Farmers Almanac claims to have 80% accuracy in their forecasts, which are determined though the use of three scientific disciplines: solar science, the study of sunspots and other solar activity; climatology, the study of prevailing weather patterns; and meteorology, the study of the atmosphere. 

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