Bjorn has always possessed the style and power that he carries today. He has the ability to accomplish anything he wants-most people notice this about him. He’s a great athlete, inside and out. No one can take that from him. It’s something he’s going to have for the rest of his life.

As his younger brother, I’ve seen him make a lot of good choices and learn a lot. When we were young kids in Minnesota, skateboarding and dreaming of learning a new trick were daily habits. We rode the little quarterpipes and ramps our dad helped us build. Bjorn was about eleven years old then, and Mini-Shred was his nickname.

At age sixteen, Bjorn was built so small that even the police would pull him over thinking he was an underaged driver. He’s not a tiny kid anymore-he now stands 5’10″ and could put up a good fight, but that’s not the person he is. No, Bjorn’s only a fighter when it comes down to the heat of the moment in a contest, or when he’s trying to land a new trick off a kicker. That’s what makes him so good. He wills himself through a session. He does it with a calm and cool manner, but as you watch him ride, you know little lightbulbs are going off in his head, pushing him to go further.

When it comes to snowboarding, though, he’s been through a lot-from the beginning with his Burton Cruise 135 and figuring out that you’re not supposed to use ski poles, to contests in Utah and riding with Hetzel up at Snowbird, to getting sponsored. Companies started taking him on trips, and he got a taste of what being a pro snowboarder is all about. Then one day Peter Line called the house and told him about a company called Forum Snowboards. About the time Bjorn got on Forum, his body was maturing, too. I guess the timing couldn’t have been any better. He was getting bigger and readily prepared for what was to come. He transformed from a little kid into a snowboarder who reaches his goals and takes his riding to new levels.

Now Bjorn lives life fast. He’s always on the move, rarely together with his wife (which is unintentional), and never home. If he’s not up in Canada with Kerns and Devun, he’s going to Norway for the Arctic Challenge, or up to Oregon to film with Heine for the latest Mack Dawg Production. The kid really never stops. If he’s not needed in Canada or Oregon, Volcom will have him go out to Mammoth, California or somewhere else to film for them. All of the travel and promotional events never end. There’s no doubt in my mind, that Bjorn is having the time of his life-as long as he has his friends with him, a good mountain, and someone to roll film. I mean, who wouldn’t want to live this life? I can’t wait to start seeing the success he’s going to have throughout the rest of his life, too. It’s going to be just like when he was young and coming up through the ranks. He’ll figure out what to do and make it happen, because that’s who he is. Good luck, Beegh.-Erik Leines

How did you become such a bitchen all-around shredder?
Bitchen-what a neato word. I like to snowboard, period. For me, if I see something that’s dope and I haven’t tried it, I get pumped to learn it-new challenges. I think there’re so many aspects and sides to snowboarding. Innovation is what changes the world and our surroundings.

Is it true your parents moved to Salt Lake City, Utah so you and your brothers could ride more powder?
No, they moved here so they could ride more powder. We just got lucky, extra lucky, having such amazing parents.

You seemed to have lucked out with your brothers, too.
I don’t think I could have cooler brothers. They stoke me out all the time. I get to travel around, snowboard with Erik, and watch him rip. The funny thing is that during our whole lives we three have always had so much fun with each other. My older bro, Tor, is crazy. He just started golfing pretty seriously a few years ago. He’s so good-it scares me. Enough said, thanks for everything. So newlywed, how’s being married going to affect yournowboarding?
I just asked Kristin his wife that, but got no response. It should get me more in touch with the female side of things. I’m in love, so who knows how it will affect anything. Maybe ask me again in five years.

You’ve had really strong video parts the last couple of years, and you’ve also had some of the best crashes. Have any of them made you cry?
Guys don’t cry. No, I only cry when “Got Milk” commercials come on TV. Hey thanks, Dave, you really love my crashes-I’m all warm and fuzzy.

How much do you plan on crashing … I mean filming this year?
Life’s so crazy right now, I guess I’ll film a lot. It’ll be interesting to see what happens this year. There’s a lot of stuff I’d like to tackle, but it seems like every time I get to snowboard, I have more and more fun.

What are you talking about? Are there some secrets you want to share with us?
No. No secrets right now.

What’s up with your contest schedule this year?
I haven’t been too up-to-date with contests lately. I’d like to ride more halfpipe, though. I rode a fun one in Norway a few months ago. But I’d like to do a couple of halfpipe contests this year, whatever is required to qualify for the Olympics. And I’ll probably do a couple of slopestyle and big-air contests. I really don’t like competition very much, whether it’s snowboarding or anything else. I guess I’m a competitive person, though. So I just contradicted myself.

Are you still bummed about the U.S. Snowboard Team’s decision not to take you to the ’98 Olympics?
Fuel for the fire, I guess. The thing that was hard was on Friday they said I was going. Everyone was pumped, but I had a bad feeling. My family was stoked. Then on Saturday, about two minutes before the press conference, the coach told me I wasn’t going. Funny how life works, but it was a good lesson and experience. The worst part was Jamil died a few days later-another lesson.

I think Jamil’s passing is still hard for a lot of people-so much potential, such a good person. Did his death help make you more aware in the backcountry?
His death taught me some other lessons, not so much about avalanche safety, but a lot about life. His death just came at a weird time in my life and in snowboarding. The thing that sticks in my mind was the last time I saw him, he was his true self. He was so ready to go to the Olympics, and when that didn’t happen, stuff just went bad. It just sucks how mysterious avalanches are, they seem to always take the best ones from us. There’re too many unforeseen things around us-I feel that you really need to live your life with awareness of your every action and thought, because essentially everyone is a teacher.

This interview is nice and safe so far; is there anything in snowboarding that bums you out?
Sure. Some of it’s just personal opinion, and some of it’s just the way things are. Hmm … snowboarding just got huge-fast. On the business side of things, a lot of people who know very little about it are way too heavily involved with it, or feel that they live it. The feeling part is okay, I think, but to see companies, people, and huge organizations that are so out of touch, sucks. On the snowboarder side, there’s a lot of dumb stuff also. But everyone has to choose their own path.

So you don’t want to “Do the Dew,” but you’ll do the “‘do-rag”?
I don’t do the Dew or the ‘do-rag. I’ve taken my shirt off and hung it from my pants, though-usually not while snowboarding. Shit, I lied. When I was little I wore bandanas during WWF. Hogan rips!

What are the next cool things in snowboarding going to be?
Faster chairlifts; goggles; more freestylers going big-mountain; digital, synchronized snowboarding in the 2008 Olympics; Mahaffey; Brandon Ruff, good skate style on rails; Chris Dufficy is the man-can you say the greatest comeback of all time? Tons of younger rippers, Shaun White can skate and shred, I like dat.

How’s everything with your sponsors these days?
Couldn’t be better. I feel lucky to be working with some of the raddest guys I know. It’s really nice to have people you can relate to on different levels in this ridiculous snowboard world. You’re probably reading this thinking, blah, blah, but the truth of the matter is these companies have super good people running ‘em. Thanks Uncle D. and Gus for making it happen at Oakley, you guys rule. Everyone at Forum and Volcom are on it. I better move to the next question before I get into it all.

I’ve heard some messed-up stories about you on team trips. Is there anything you want to discuss?
Huh? We just like to have fun. It’s cool getting to go on vacation, though.Steve Ruff, a.k.a. “The Corrupter,” is extremely good at his job. Thanks, pal.

What do you think is the most important part of being a pro shred?
There’re a lot of everyday “important” things about it. Being positive helps, and just keeping in touch with what’s going on. Kids especially, I love stoking them out.

Thank yous:My family for the love and support my new family for being real. Kristin. My sponsors and friends there. Bros and pals. Photographers and filmers. God, Volcom, Oakley, Jay Twitty, Woolly, Neil, E.A., Troy, Gus, Joe Forum, Caines, Cory, V, Ruff, Pauly, Niko, Jaimie, Ali and Dave at Drop, Hot Skates, Rudy, Milo, Davis and Brown at old Salty, Steve at Diaaka, Kevin Staab, Mikey, Micha, Chad, Whitlake, J.P., Johan, Terje, Jamie, Devun, Jones, Pete, Kevin, Jimmy, Frank, Paul, Abe, Keith and Andy, Hetz, Matty, Benny, Tonino, Dawger, Chico, Lil’ Nate, Mathis, Kearns (late night), hip-hop, Hazeltine, Mouse, Gunny and Jen, Snowbird, skateboarding, Grampa Rog, Temple, Downing, Dano, Heine, Steffy, Dave, Shem, Embry, Covalla, Baker, metal, HCSC, Joel, Ben, Andersons, and I can’t type any more. Bruce Lee. Okay, thanks everyone. Dionne and Browner. The Cats. All right, that’s it for now. Bye.ays?
Couldn’t be better. I feel lucky to be working with some of the raddest guys I know. It’s really nice to have people you can relate to on different levels in this ridiculous snowboard world. You’re probably reading this thinking, blah, blah, but the truth of the matter is these companies have super good people running ‘em. Thanks Uncle D. and Gus for making it happen at Oakley, you guys rule. Everyone at Forum and Volcom are on it. I better move to the next question before I get into it all.

I’ve heard some messed-up stories about you on team trips. Is there anything you want to discuss?
Huh? We just like to have fun. It’s cool getting to go on vacation, though.Steve Ruff, a.k.a. “The Corrupter,” is extremely good at his job. Thanks, pal.

What do you think is the most important part of being a pro shred?
There’re a lot of everyday “important” things about it. Being positive helps, and just keeping in touch with what’s going on. Kids especially, I love stoking them out.

Thank yous:My family for the love and support my new family for being real. Kristin. My sponsors and friends there. Bros and pals. Photographers and filmers. God, Volcom, Oakley, Jay Twitty, Woolly, Neil, E.A., Troy, Gus, Joe Forum, Caines, Cory, V, Ruff, Pauly, Niko, Jaimie, Ali and Dave at Drop, Hot Skates, Rudy, Milo, Davis and Brown at old Salty, Steve at Diaaka, Kevin Staab, Mikey, Micha, Chad, Whitlake, J.P., Johan, Terje, Jamie, Devun, Jones, Pete, Kevin, Jimmy, Frank, Paul, Abe, Keith and Andy, Hetz, Matty, Benny, Tonino, Dawger, Chico, Lil’ Nate, Mathis, Kearns (late night), hip-hop, Hazeltine, Mouse, Gunny and Jen, Snowbird, skateboarding, Grampa Rog, Temple, Downing, Dano, Heine, Steffy, Dave, Shem, Embry, Covalla, Baker, metal, HCSC, Joel, Ben, Andersons, and I can’t type any more. Bruce Lee. Okay, thanks everyone. Dionne and Browner. The Cats. All right, that’s it for now. Bye.