Hi, my name is Allister Schultz. Born in Seoul, South Korea and adopted from an orphanage, I am very blessed with the opportunity to make a life here in the U.S. My passion for snowboarding originated from skateboarding, and I was immediately hooked by the freedom and sense of pureness that it gave me. I have made my home in Bend, Oregon, where riding at Mt. Bachelor on a stormy day with a group of friends is always fun. Although there were bumps along the road, I thank God every day for where I’m at now–and where I came from, all because of this thing we call a snowboard.–Allister Schultz

It seems this interview is long overdue. You’ve been in it for years.

I’m stoked on it. I think some people might wonder about me. That’s a funny thing about snowboarding. I got out of filming for a couple years and wasn’t really in the magazines. People in the industry are like, “Did you quit snowboarding?”–while I was riding 140 days a year.

I’d never want to talk myself up, I just want to tell them I’m still out there. I’ve had some stuff happen in my life that sidetracked me from my snowboarding career. It’s made me put myself in check and look at things differently. Sometimes I’m bummed–I started riding at the same time as Peter Line and those guys, now he’s a millionaire. I could criticize myself, like why I’m not making all this money. But things happen along the way. Decisions I made and things I had to do. I always felt like I had to look out for myself. Live and learn, you know.

Why don’t you ever leave Oregon?

Because it’s always good here. Maybe not for filming or shooting pictures, but there’s always powder in the winter. I filmed a lot of stuff for my parts, and for the Mack Dawg movie this year, in Oregon. I like riding to film, going out with all the good guys–but riding Mt. Bachelor with my friends is super fun and simple.

So you don’t care about coverage, exposure, and prosperity?

I wouldn’t say that. There are just different ways you can do it. You can market yourself and try to get in the spotlight, but I’ve always taken a more mellow approach. Everything else that comes along with it is rad, but I’m not trying to prove anything. I just try to keep it fun and the same as it’s always been since I was like fourteen. Six or seven seasons ago I traveled and filmed with Dawger for a whole year, and filmed a lot the following year, too. I was having fun, but I was traveling too much. And I just started to feel like I was losing some of why I was snowboarding–just having a blast at the mountain. People might criticize me for that, just staying here, but I got back to my roots that way. It’s all worked out.

Peter and Josh Dirksen say you’re one of the smoothest riders out there. Where does that flow come from?

It’s cool they said that. Dirksen and I both rode with this guy named Chad Cooksey. When I was young I looked up to him and tried to emulate his style. He was the smoothest–he looked like he wasn’t even trying.

What happened with Forum?

I was totally stoked riding for them and working with all those guys. But I was at the bottom, and they are all so good, such a tight-knit group, it was hard for me to feel like I was part of the team. Lib Tech is just more my style.

What’s up with Lib?

Lib is sick, everything just clicked–plus I ride a lot with Joey McGuire. They have Chris Brown riding for them now, Jesse Burtner, and Martin Landvick. We’re all doing the same thing. We’re getting the team solid, it’s going to be good. Chris and I are working on a line of park and pipe boards … I don’t know if I’m supposed to even talk about that yet.

How did you get started in snowboarding?

I started back in 1986That season I went a few times, then the next year I bought my first snowboard–a Sims FE1500 swallowtail. I was just a little kid riding around Bachelor for like a year or two. Then I met Kurt Heine. From the chairlift, I saw this guy building a jump. I came down and asked him if I could try it. He ended up filming a few tricks of me for Stayin’ Alive–I think it was his first movie. It crosses every kid’s mind–”I want to be like Craig Kelly or Jeff Brushie someday”–but I never dreamed it would turn out like this.

So you like your job?

You know, when you go out filming, you’re definitely expected to produce–you’ve gotta be ready. The filmer’s out there, other people are putting their time into it, so it can feel like work. But then again, you’re just hitting jumps. But it’s crazy when we’re filming. We get out of the car, or snowmobile up to something, the jump’s built, we strap in and hit it. There’s no warm-up, so you’ve gotta have all your tricks wired.

I filmed a bunch with Kevin Jones last year. We’d drive to the mountain together, from Bend up to Hood, and we were talking about it–we’re like blown away. Going snowboarding with a bunch of our good friends–that’s what we do. It’s crazy it came to where it’s at right now. I’m lucky.

So tell me about your smoking days.

Those days are long gone. I smoked super heavy for like ten years, then I just decided it wasn’t for me. I’m a way more on-it person now. I don’t want to hinder myself and give people an edge over me because of something I’m doing. When I was all stoned I was at a disadvantage.

You moved out on your own when you were fourteen. How did you pull that off?

I wanted to be independent. I had some problems with my parents; they weren’t bad people or anything, they just had a different agenda. So I said, “You guys aren’t my real parents, I’m outta here.”

I finished part of my freshman and my whole sophomore year on my own, and still got straight As. Then, when I was a junior, I dropped out. I got my GED and just started snowboarding all the time.

I worry this might send a bad message–the whole idea of being on your own at that age. You wouldn’t believe how hard it was. When I was fifteen or sixteen I was bummed. I don’t have any regrets, but no matter what, family is the most important thing.

What about your family?

I have two sisters and a brother. We were all adopted. I’m Korean. My brother’s black, my sister’s black/Filipino/Indian, and my other sister’s white. You should see the pictures from when we were kids–everyone’s different colors. My parents were the type of people who just wanted to help others. They’re religious, I think they felt that need. I’m really good friends with them now.

You’re going to school again?

I’ve taken classes for the last couple of winters–a business class and a couple of writing classes. I do it strictly for the knowledge–just to keep my brain going. I like being in the classroom with 30 other people who are trying to think, too. When this part of my life is over, I’ll just move on to the next thing and be thankful.

And you’d like to thank some people?

First I want to thank God and my mom and dad for being cool. My brother Shabb Wun, my sisters Latoya and Alissa, my nieces and nephew Natasha, Maliek, Derraun, and Shayla. My godfather Glen, and Brittney. I want to say what’s up to all my good friends: Pete Lawson, Glass Joe, Nutzy, the Butsch brothers, Big Ed, Benny, Bird, Udo, Nar, DJ Wiseguy, DJ Red Ize, Chewey, Frankie, Bugz, Kyle King, JR, Greg Dread, Fly, Andrew Brownell, Gerry Lopez, Wade, Lilly, Gus, Jeremy Carol, Adam, Jubal, Mark Provost, all my Asian friends, all my black homeys, my Native friends, Black Mobb family, IBC, WSC, my Hispanic homeys, Trane, the Lums, Cole.

Thanks to all the people who took a picture of me: Foster, Sullivan, Pascal, Hatchetts, Shields, Embry, Tullis, Kaua, Goodman, Fresno, Whitey, Hausworth, Brunkhart, Hill, Sanchez, Ruht, Yant, Grove, A.V., Graves, Hostynek, Cheski, Sedway, and Mauricio. Extra special thanks to Mike McEntire for being the coolest guy and friend. Ross Steffey for chilling with me, Kurt Heine for starting me out, Chris Owen, Ruff Dog, Raul, Rudy, Matt Cummins, Wett Ratt, Brian Harris, Jeannine, Raylene, and Peter Line.

All the sicko riders I’ve had a chance to ride with, and who keep it real, especially Kevin Jones, Wille, Todd Richards, Tara Dakides, Terje, Jamie Lynn, Schlosser, Dave Lee, Joey McGuire, Nico, Sypniewski, Egge, McAllister, Dirksen, Devun Walsh, Jamo, Burtner, Landvick, Dave Downing and Shannon Dunn, Guch, J-F, Jason Brown, Ahmon Stamps, Lael, Martin, Marek, Cooksey, Yamada, Donahue, Blattner, Marc Frank, Mike O’Shea, Shaun Donnell, M3 guys, Forum guys, Nate Cole, Jussi, Keir, T. Andrew, Allian team, Ingemar, Supernatural team, Sims team, Leslie Olsen, Malmi, Jeremy Jones, Otterstrom, Platt, T. Parker, Blue, Aurelie, Meeks, Estes, Wolf, Hibdon, Noah Brandon, Sluggo, Morry, K. Young, Temple, Greg Goulet, Joe Dean, all the locals at Hood, Josh King, Mike Paulino, and anyone else I forgot, I’m sorry.ck homeys, my Native friends, Black Mobb family, IBC, WSC, my Hispanic homeys, Trane, the Lums, Cole.

Thanks to all the people who took a picture of me: Foster, Sullivan, Pascal, Hatchetts, Shields, Embry, Tullis, Kaua, Goodman, Fresno, Whitey, Hausworth, Brunkhart, Hill, Sanchez, Ruht, Yant, Grove, A.V., Graves, Hostynek, Cheski, Sedway, and Mauricio. Extra special thanks to Mike McEntire for being the coolest guy and friend. Ross Steffey for chilling with me, Kurt Heine for starting me out, Chris Owen, Ruff Dog, Raul, Rudy, Matt Cummins, Wett Ratt, Brian Harris, Jeannine, Raylene, and Peter Line.

All the sicko riders I’ve had a chance to ride with, and who keep it real, especially Kevin Jones, Wille, Todd Richards, Tara Dakides, Terje, Jamie Lynn, Schlosser, Dave Lee, Joey McGuire, Nico, Sypniewski, Egge, McAllister, Dirksen, Devun Walsh, Jamo, Burtner, Landvick, Dave Downing and Shannon Dunn, Guch, J-F, Jason Brown, Ahmon Stamps, Lael, Martin, Marek, Cooksey, Yamada, Donahue, Blattner, Marc Frank, Mike O’Shea, Shaun Donnell, M3 guys, Forum guys, Nate Cole, Jussi, Keir, T. Andrew, Allian team, Ingemar, Supernatural team, Sims team, Leslie Olsen, Malmi, Jeremy Jones, Otterstrom, Platt, T. Parker, Blue, Aurelie, Meeks, Estes, Wolf, Hibdon, Noah Brandon, Sluggo, Morry, K. Young, Temple, Greg Goulet, Joe Dean, all the locals at Hood, Josh King, Mike Paulino, and anyone else I forgot, I’m sorry.