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Winter Weather Forecast – Farmers’ Almanac 2017- 2018

Winter Weather Predictions & Forecast 2017- 2018

The official Winter Weather Outlook from the Farmers’ Almanac is here. With less than 100 days to the start of the season, we’re all wondering where’s going to snow.  According to this long-awaited weather forecast, the east coast and mid-west seem like they’ll be the big winners for most snow this up coming season. Regions including Montana and Wyoming may also get hit with several storms. While there’s no actual crystal ball into seeing the winter’s future, here’s to hoping for a snowy season for all.

Check out the official Farmers’ Almanac prediction below. 

Farmers’ Almanac Winter Weather Forecast & Predictions 2017 – 2018 

THE COLD
Cold conditions are back! According to the Farmers' Almanac's 200-year-old formula, this winter is expected to be a bit more "normal" as far as the temperatures are concerned, especially in the eastern and central parts of the country–chiefly those areas to the east of the Rocky Mountains–with many locations experiencing above-normal precipitation.

THE DRY
For the western third of the country—mainly those areas west of the Continental Divide—the overall winter will not be as wet as last year. Our forecasts are pointing to a return to more normal winter conditions in regard to both temperatures and precipitation. This is not to say that there won't be occasional bouts of heavy precipitation sweeping in from the Pacific, or shots of cold air pushing south through western Canada (because what's winter without those?), but these should be balanced out by spells of dry and mild weather.

THE WET
Break out the space heaters, umbrellas, and warm socks, because the Southeast will see below normal winter temperatures with an unseasonable chill reaching as far south as the Gulf Coast, with above-average precipitation.
From the Great Lakes into the Northeast, snowier-than-normal conditions are expected. We can hear the skiers, boarders, and snowmobilers cheering from here!

Of particular note, for those readers rooting for shovels, we are red-flagging the 2018 dates of January 20-23, February 4-7 & 16-19, and March 1-3 & 20-23 along the Atlantic Seaboard for some heavy precipitation. Good news for skiers and snow enthusiasts, but for those looking to build sandcastles, not-so-good news, but a good time to book that tropical getaway.

THE WILD?
And for parts of the western Great Lakes, eastern Great Plains, and points south, including Arklatexoma (where Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, and Oklahoma abut), be prepared for wide swings in the weather pendulum, from very warm to very cold, and periods of tranquil conditions mixed with occasional spells of tempestuous weather.

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So just how are these forecasts generated? We asked the Farmers’ Almanac, and this is what they said.

The editors of the Farmers' Almanac firmly deny using any type of computer satellite tracking equipment, weather lore or groundhogs. What they will admit to is using a specific and reliable set of rules that were developed back in 1818 by David Young, the Almanac's first editor. These rules have been altered slightly and turned into a formula that is both mathematical and astronomical. The formula takes things like sunspot activity, tidal action of the Moon, position of the planets, and a variety of other factors into consideration. The only person who knows the exact formula is the Farmers' Almanac weather prognosticator who goes by the pseudonym of Caleb Weatherbee. To protect this proprietary and reliable formula, the editors of the Farmers' Almanac prefer to keep both Caleb's true identity and the formula a closely guarded brand secret.

How have their forecasts shaped up in years’ past? Check out these other Farmers’ Almanac Forecasts here

Get ready for winter, check out the trailer for our new Snowboarding movie Arcadia right here:

 

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