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Farmers’ Almanac Winter Weather Forecast 2015-2016

Farmers’ Almanac Winter Weather Forecast 2015-2016

The Farmers’ Almanac official winter weather forecast for 2015-2016 just debuted and it predicts a very strong winter on the East Coast and in the Midwest, while western regions including, Colorado and Wyoming, may see more of a “typical winter.” According to this forecast, which appears in the 199th edition of the Farmers’ Almanac, and is determined 16 months in advance, the Pacific Northwest and California will possibly get skunked, and have more of a “mild” season.

The Farmers' Almanac Official Winter Forecast is here

Read on for the full forecast from the Farmers’ Almanac and view our powder-packed photo gallery above. Time to start planning your winter shred trips now!

Official 2016 Winter Outlook from the Farmers’ Almanac

According to the Farmers’ Almanac, the winter of 2015–2016 is looking like a repeat of last winter, at least in terms of temperatures with unseasonably cold conditions over the Atlantic Seaboard, eastern portions of the Great Lakes, and the lower peninsula of Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, most of the Tennessee and Mississippi Valley, as well as much of the Gulf Coast.

New Englanders will once again experience a very frigid (shivery) winter (Déjà vu).

Much of the central United States will see near-normal winter temperatures. This includes the western and central Great Lakes, the upper peninsula of Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Illinois, and most of the Great Plains.

In these areas, Ms. Nature will mix intervals of unseasonably mild temperatures with occasional shots of bitter cold; average it out and it comes out–average!

Texas and the other South Central States will see a cool to cold winter, but nothing too extreme.

Farther west, over the Rockies, the Colorado Plateau, Pacific Northwest, and the Southwest States, milder than normal temperatures are expected.

Precipitation-wise, if you like snow, then you should head out to the northern and central Great Plains (most of the North Central States), the Great Lakes, New England (sorry Boston!), and parts of the Ohio Valley where snowier-than-normal conditions are forecast.

Over the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic States, the winter will be stormy with a good amount of snow. We are “red-flagging” the second week of January and the second week of February for possible heavy winter weather with a long, drawn out spell of stormy weather extending through much of the first half of March. So sharpen those skis and boards, because the eastern slopes look like the ideal places to carve some turns.

An active storm track will bring above-normal precipitation to the Southeast States, as well as the Mississippi Valley, Southern Great Plains, the Gulf Coast, and along the Atlantic Seaboard.

Another area of above-normal precipitation (thanks to incoming storms from the Pacific) will cover much of the Pacific Northwest.

Near-to-below normal winter precipitation will cover the rest of the country, which includes much of the drought-stricken areas in the Southwest.

Check out more about the Farmers’ Almanac here.

Read more weather stories here!