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Ask The Dude

How To: Fix A Blown Out Edge

Think of your board’s edges like car tires. It’s where all the handling and control happens. When they’re worn down and beat up, they don’t grip in snow or ice. Blown out, and they’re sketchy and loose. Early season, your edges can really take a beating so if you tear one out, here’s how to fix it.

(If your edge is only dented, check out this How To.)

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Prep The Wound

Cut out a slim semi-circle of base material around the damaged edge with a razorblade. If the edge is still hanging on, bend it back into shape as best as you can. If it’s completely missing, use a Dremel or file and trim the existing edges with a slight inward angle, creating a lip for the new edge. Clean up the area with sandpaper and a razorblade or chisel, making it as flush as possible.

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Play Surgeon

Cut a piece of replacement edge a bit longer than the gap, and use a file to trim it to a snug fit. Put a thin coating of epoxy between the edge and core, and then place the edge in line. Now pre-drill holes around the edge tabs with a 1/16” or smaller bit, being careful not to go through the board. Fill the holes with epoxy, and tighten down the edge with a handful of fine finishing screws, being careful not to strip them out. With the board flat and base up, let the epoxy cure.

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Post-Op Procedure

Depending on the screw heads, you might need to file them down or completely off to allow for the base repair. Do so with a Dremel and be carful not to overheat the screws or edge, breaking the epoxy bond. Sand away any excess epoxy, then file the edge flush with the side edge.

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Free Base

There are a few different base repairs to finish the job. Cut and trim a base repair patch to fit snug, add epoxy, and sandwich it with two scrapers (metal or plastic) and a few clamps. You can do a basic drip P-Tex repair, but it will likely crack and fall out. The last method is a base weld, a more intricate and solid fix. Check out How To: Base Weld.

Tip

Check out tognar.com or svst.comfor specialty shop repair tools and materials.

 

Illustrations: Shawn O’Keefe