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Core Chaos: Lib Tech Mayhem Rocket Review

Words: Drew Zieff

MSRP: $699.95

If you've been pitted in both the white room of a deep pow day and the green room of a spewing barrel, chances are you're a stranger to neither Lib Tech snowboards nor Lost surfboards. And unless you've been snowboarding under a rock, you know that Lib Tech's been getting into the surf game the past few years. In fact, the Pacific Northwest powerhouse has revolutionized surfboard construction by ditching traditional polyester and epoxy and using a completely new arsenal of durable, eco-friendly components. Their ding-proof decks have drummed up a cult following—especially among unforgiving wave chasers who are tired of repairing and replacing their boards.

Over the past two years, Lib has released a few collaborations with celebrated Lost surfboard shaper Matt Biolos. Biolos was stoked to bring a few of his designs — including the Sub Buggy, the Short Round, and the Puddle Jumper—to life with Lib's eco-friendly and durable construction technology.

Eric Jackson, tumultuous tail grab. Photo: Tim Zimmerman
Eric Jackson, tumultuous tail grab. Photo: Tim Zimmerman

But we're not here to talk surf. Or are we? The Mayhem Rocket, one of Biolos' contributions to Lib's ever-impressive snowboard fleet, thins the walls between the white and green room. The Rocket is available solely in a 157.5cm, but Biolos, with a hint of humor, included the surf measurements on the Bio Beans topsheet as well: the Rocket is a 5'1" X 11.70" X 10.50" X 12.30" with a 657 square inch planing surface. That essentially means the Rocket merits a "wide load" bumper sticker on the back.

Biolos is nothing short of a master when it comes to contour design, and the Rocket has rockered entry and exit points with subtle camber in between. The setback profile pairs well with the elliptical sidecut for everything from arcing wide turns to slashing through tight trees.

Blair Habenicht, method mayhem. Photo: Tim Zimmerman
Blair Habenicht, method mayhem. Photo: Tim Zimmerman

Our staff dug the directional shape and camber of the Rocket; one called the rocket's sharp tail lines "dreamy," while another said the camber was "quick, smooth and powerful." Float was to be expected, and the Rocket exceeded expectations in the buoyancy department—thanks to Biolos' 657 square-inch surface. However, some staff above the 170-lb mark noted that while the tail was playful and loose in powder, the Aspen/Columbian Gold core felt a touch too soft to be trustworthy at speed on variable snow.

Our crew's consensus? The Rocket is a blast on pow days and can be a playful change of pace for everyday all-mountain resort riding, but it's on the cusp of being too soft to handle crud. That said, consider this slasher if you want to catch air and get barreled—no matter the season.

Lib X Lost Mayhem collab boards from top to bottom: Mayhem Round Nose Fish, Mayhem Rocket, Mayhem Short Fat. Photo: Tim Zimmerman
Lib X Lost Mayhem collab boards from top to bottom: Mayhem Round Nose Fish, Mayhem Rocket, Mayhem Short Fat. Photo: Tim Zimmerman

 

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